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rtodd
February 10th, 2008, 08:41 PM
Well,

I seemed to have stumbled in swimming faster.

A year later, I have not been able to lower my time in the 100 free. I went 63, about a second slower.

I lowered the 200 free from 2:32 to 2:29 and I lowered the 500 free from 7:40 to 7:09.

I improved my endurance but not speed. I got some good feedback on my catch, so I have something to work on.

Overall I am not too happy for almost a years worth of work, but I will forge on.

Chris Stevenson
February 10th, 2008, 09:12 PM
Well,

I seemed to have stumbled in swimming faster.

A year later, I have not been able to lower my time in the 100 free. I went 63, about a second slower.

I lowered the 200 free from 2:32 to 2:29 and I lowered the 500 free from 7:40 to 7:09.

I improved my endurance but not speed. I got some good feedback on my catch, so I have something to work on.

Overall I am not too happy for almost a years worth of work, but I will forge on.

You dropped 3 seconds on the 200 and 31 (!) in the 500. I wouldn't call that stumbling at all.

I've always found that real speed (and easy speed, which isn't the same) is the last thing to come in the training cycle. With the drops you've made, I bet that when you taper & shave you'll be tearing it up in the 100. In the meantime, revel in the improvement you've already made -- excellent job.

One last thing. The effort you are putting forth is a large part of the reward. It isn't -- or shouldn't be -- (just) about the end times. You swim a season, get some times and if they aren't exactly what you want, what have you got to show for it? A season's worth of clean living and striving toward your goals. That's worth a few of these :drink: and should be a source of pride.

pwolf66
February 10th, 2008, 09:29 PM
One last thing. The effort you are putting forth is a large part of the reward. It isn't -- or shouldn't be -- (just) about the end times. You swim a season, get some times and if they aren't exactly what you want, what have you got to show for it? A season's worth of clean living and striving toward your goals. That's worth a few of these :drink: and should be a source of pride.

I have to 2nd Chris here. While swimming faster, better, stronger, etc.. seems to be the primary goal, really isn't it about investing in ourselves? 1 less pound of fat, 1 less beat per minute of our hearts are (hopefully) investments we make in a longer, healthier life. Obsession (and I'm a sufferer too) over times should be secondary to investing in a healthier future. This was clearly shown this past weekend by a wonderful 95 year young woman who swam so VERY respecable times for someone 30 years younger.

rtodd
February 10th, 2008, 10:08 PM
Thanks for the ecouragement. I am keeping it in perspective, but to me staying healthy and the challenge to do well are both important.

I think all the hard work showed up in the dop in the 500, but not the 100 because there is something wrong with my technique. There seems to be something wrong with my catch has some people have pointed out. I am hoping once I fix it, the speed will come. This is a great sport and I'm glad I found it.

Blackbeard's Peg
February 11th, 2008, 12:43 AM
I'm assuming you've just swum these all in a meet recently. There are a lot of variables that could have caused you to be a bit disappointed with your 100 - i'm thinking event placement, if you had a huge bellyflopper next to you, pool depth, your mental preparedness, loose muscles, bad start, a bad turn etc.

But bear in mind that the 1 2 and 500 frees are three completely different races. It is a lot harder to drop time in the shorter events (just ask paul wolf about his 50 free or 50 fly), as there is less time and distance to recover from a mishap.

But it is about training too. Judging by your time drops (nice job with that, by the way!!!), looks like you have indeed done wonders for your endurance in the last year. But if you're looking towards the 100, you've got to do some speed work too. As a distance swimmer, I know it is tough to balance them both out. Next time you've got an option, pick the sprint workout and work on your turnover and fast turns.

Something I like to think about my (or any distance swimmer's) ability to do a good 100: we distance folks can get a hard pace and hold it over a longer period of time, and that translates to a 100 when the swimmer can pick a hard pace and use his/her endurance to swim through the pain and hold on to that pace for the full 100.