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SwimStud
February 12th, 2008, 05:19 PM
My daughter has a science project to do and I've been designated assistant. Anyone have any good/fun ideas that could be done involving swimming. If I can incorporate me swimming into a science project, I will get double mileage out of time I will spend swimming anyhow. Anyone have any thoughts?

geochuck
February 12th, 2008, 05:32 PM
Swimming spagehtti http://www.science-house.org/learn/CountertopChem/exp1.html

Seagurl51
February 12th, 2008, 05:51 PM
Depends what kind of science you're doing. I have a ton of project ideas that I've done for my psychology classes.

Rob Copeland
February 12th, 2008, 05:56 PM
One of my favorite science experiments has always been “Characterization of Organic Illumination Systems” or how to make The Electric Pickle. Not swimming related but always a good conversation piece.

If you want a swimming experiment, you could repeat the U of M “swimming in a substance thicker than water” experiment.

nkfrench
February 12th, 2008, 06:37 PM
If you want a swimming experiment, you could repeat the U of M “swimming in a substance thicker than water” experiment.

That was great! Not sure how many pools were out there willing to be filled up with gloopy stuff. I even had a dream about that one night.

mermaid
February 12th, 2008, 06:54 PM
How about a study of the fastest suits - then you get double-double points! You could get the new speedo body suit vs the old speedo suit vs. jammers vs. standard trunks vs. something like what "blackbeardspegleg" wears. Speedo vs TYR vs finals vs ???

cowsvils
February 12th, 2008, 07:01 PM
I was thinking the same thing as mermaid, maybe you could get body suits comped by those companies, triple whammy

luff2swim
February 12th, 2008, 07:03 PM
How about a swimming golf experiment.

Record what kind of speed changes happen at a range of stroke counts. Also see how a variety of technique changes make a difference in stroke count, speed and percieved rate of exertion

SwimStud
February 12th, 2008, 08:04 PM
How about a swimming golf experiment.

Record what kind of speed changes happen at a range of stroke counts. Also see how a variety of technique changes make a difference in stroke count, speed and percieved rate of exertion

That might be somehing to do. I have been informed by young Einstein that it should be more along the bog-standard "potato clock" type thing... damn.. I'm going to miss pool time!

ALM
February 12th, 2008, 09:11 PM
How old is Mini-Stud?

jaegermeister
February 12th, 2008, 09:36 PM
My son did one where he had about 8 swimmers drink water during a workout, and another group drink gatorade. These were the upper age-group level swimmers. Then at the end of practice, he had them swim a 50 yard event where they had a recent race time that they knew. The measurement was: how far off the race pace was each group.
Its far from perfect science. But the kids were very interested in helping out, as was the coach. Their practice lasted about 1 hour, 30-45 minutes. Anything less than that, I doubt there would be any difference.
Good Luck!

ViveBene
February 12th, 2008, 10:05 PM
Hi - I'm interested in giving this some thought.
Daughter's general age and achievement in science?

For very young: Can dad swim faster than a polar bear?

An experiment I conducted on myself: Can a sighted person swim with closed eyes and tell where the wall or end is? For older child, this could be run as a 2-person experiment: How many attempts before dad approaches the acuity of a person with limited vision? Fluid dynamics at the wall that cue dad where the wall is?

The science lies in formulating the question.

What fun!

Regards, VB


My daughter has a science project to do and I've been designated assistant. Anyone have any good/fun ideas that could be done involving swimming. If I can incorporate me swimming into a science project, I will get double mileage out of time I will spend swimming anyhow. Anyone have any thoughts?

SwimStud
February 12th, 2008, 10:22 PM
How old is Mini-Stud?
Mini-stud is 10.

It has to be presented at the science fair...so I guess if it's in the water it could be filmed. I am sure my daughter will love the prospect of presenting her father in a Speedo to the school...serious negative cool points...
:rofl:

mermaid
February 12th, 2008, 10:36 PM
UUHHHH but you're "SwimStud" . . . ergo speedo should be just fine.

ALM
February 12th, 2008, 10:40 PM
OK, how about this:

Get one of those bathroom scales that measures body fat percentage.

Take it to a Masters workout and an age-group workout.

Record each swimmer's percentage of body fat. Then have each swimmer get into the deep end of the pool. Have the swimmer try to float, vertically, with his arms at his sides.

Look for a correlation between percent body fat and how deep they sink when they try to float.

The hypothesis would be that the higher the percentage of body fat, the higher they will "float".

I suggested the Masters and the age group kids because I am assuming that you'd see higher body fat percentages among the Masters, and lower ones among the age group kids.

Mausy
February 12th, 2008, 11:08 PM
I did a science project in high school related to swimming. I predicted that in the 100 free, if a swimmer was first after the first 25, they would finish first in the race. I had an entire high school season to gather results, but there are always races going on that could be used. The results were that if you first after the first 25, there was about a 70% chance that you would finish first.

Noodles Romanoff
February 12th, 2008, 11:59 PM
Mini-stud is 10.

It has to be presented at the science fair...so I guess if it's in the water it could be filmed. I am sure my daughter will love the prospect of presenting her father in a Speedo to the school...serious negative cool points...
:rofl:So I guess cold water shrinkage, would not be an age appropriate science experiment…:party2::censor:

ViveBene
February 13th, 2008, 07:33 AM
Ten is fourth grade these days?

Are they expected to present a hypothesis, or is it merely descriptive (such as which mammals swim faster and which swim slower)?
Perhaps the actual conduct of the trial doesn't have to be filmed, although a photo of critical elements -- swimmer diving into water, somebody holding a stopwatch -- might add color.

If this is a one-subject, one-trial experiment, maybe physiological adaptations during a long swim: heart rate and respiratory rate at different parts of the swim.

What does Mini-stud have an interest in? I think river otters are cool.

VB




Mini-stud is 10.

It has to be presented at the science fair...so I guess if it's in the water it could be filmed. I am sure my daughter will love the prospect of presenting her father in a Speedo to the school...serious negative cool points...

aquageek
February 13th, 2008, 07:53 AM
How about an evaluation of track versus grab start or new angled blocks versus older flat blocks? Which is faster? Which gets your further out, etc. That might have zero interest to your daughter but I sure would be interested in your findings.

Ten has been fourth grade since at least the 70s.

stillwater
February 13th, 2008, 11:10 AM
How about a streamlining experiment. Have your subject push off the wall with hands at thier side and measure distance. Next have subject push off with hands like superman, measure distance. Lastly have subject in full streamline. The differences are significant.

Time flag to flag using an open turn vs. filp turn.

Measure verticle jump and relate to distance covered off wall in push off.

Time wetsuit vs. non-wetsuit.

Blackbeard's Peg
February 13th, 2008, 12:03 PM
Ten is fourth grade these days?

Ten has been fourth grade since at least the 70s.

Remember, it is February. With age cutoffs, kids are entering Kindergarden age 5 (which is normal, but then they're aging up right away. For example: a kid with a Dec birthday has to wait until he/she is "5" to enter Kindergarden. They won't take him as a 4 3/4 y/o because of the "4," so he enters school as a 5 3/4 y/o kndergardner and turns 6 three months later. Thus, he began school this year as a 9 3/4 y/o 4th grader, and then "aged up" during the year. I don't have Stud's kids' birthday's memorized, but chances are something like that is the case.

Kids are a lot older these days than when I went to school. My elementary school cutoff was December 1 and I know we had SEVERAL kids with birthdays around then. They were always the last to turn whatever age the rest of us were. Now, its September 1.

2fish&1whale
February 13th, 2008, 09:15 PM
How about heart rate with differrent strokes?
Swim all 4 50Y and compare which one raises the heart rate more.
Or swim 100,500,1000 and take the heart rate after each,compare.

My son had considered this one for his project....
How much does the kick contribute to each stroke?
Swim 1,2,3 or all 4 strokes with your feet immobile(tie 'em together) and time.
Repeat, this time using your stroke plus kick.

It helps that you are volunteering as a test subject since you can make sure the data taken is acurate.

notsofast
February 14th, 2008, 12:05 PM
Measuring the heart rate and comparing times with and without a kick are great ideas.
If you do them (or any others) be sure to randomize over a period of time. Like if you compared heart rate on free vs. breast:
Day 1 you'd swim free then breast. Day 2 you'd swim breast then free. Etc.
If you always swam the same stroke in the first trial, then the heart rate for the second trial could be affected by the effort exerted in the first.

SwimStud
February 14th, 2008, 12:07 PM
thanks for the input ...I like the heart rate one. We have to have something visual and presentable at the fair. Powerpoints and such may work but I don't know if this will fit the bill. I don't see why we can't make a presentation with video clips.

Plus she can do all the filming and commentary (she is good at commentary). So it would be her work just my exertions.

mattson
February 14th, 2008, 12:54 PM
For very young: Can dad swim faster than a polar bear?

Sounds like someone doesn't like dad very much!
:drown:

Did you ever sleep in a bear pit
With apple cores and mice along
Did you ever lay on ice and grit
Or search for a place where the wind was gone
...
There ain't no bears in there (cache cache)
Not a single bear in there (cache cache)

swimminlyn
February 14th, 2008, 04:16 PM
When I was coaching several years back I had a girl that did one based the times of a 25 free under different circumstances, ie...with a cap/ without a cap, before practice/after practice, drag suits/no drag suit, regular suit/tech suit, start from a block/start from in water...

Not sure of all the tech things she did, just remember swimming some 25s for her.

Good luck with the project.

ALM
February 15th, 2008, 12:20 AM
When I was coaching several years back I had a girl that did one based the times of a 25 free under different circumstances...

That's it!

"How fast can my daddy swim the 25 Free...

...after no beers?"

...after one beer?"

...after two beers?"

...and so on, until DaddyStud pukes...

2fish&1whale
February 15th, 2008, 08:47 AM
Measuring the heart rate and comparing times with and without a kick are great ideas.
If you do them (or any others) be sure to randomize over a period of time. Like if you compared heart rate on free vs. breast:
Day 1 you'd swim free then breast. Day 2 you'd swim breast then free. Etc.
If you always swam the same stroke in the first trial, then the heart rate for the second trial could be affected by the effort exerted in the first.


I should have included that it helps to know the resting heart rate, allow for recovery and switch up the strokes if possible.
You could also count the heart rate as it builds up, and with no recovery...
1.resting HR
2.after 50 free
3.after 50 back
4.after 50 breast
5.after 50 fly

As you can see we had put a lot of thought into this project...

Susan Torpy
February 15th, 2008, 01:07 PM
My daughter did an experiment in 5th grade using a stretch cord testing the 4 strokes. She had fun doing it and won Honorable Mention.

SwimStud
February 15th, 2008, 01:10 PM
...and so on, until DaddyStud pukes...

you forget, I'm British...it could take a while...

DRaat
February 15th, 2008, 02:00 PM
Hmmm. Can Dad swim faster than a polar bear? Interesting question. While the final answer may be pending, I am certain that any Dad can swim faster if the polar bear is chasing Dad rather than Dad swimming behind the polar bear. I, personally do not want my daughter to put me to the test!

geochuck
February 15th, 2008, 02:57 PM
If the stud kid needs it here is Polar Bear info http://pbsg.npolar.no/pb_faq.htm#swim