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SwimStud
March 26th, 2008, 03:09 PM
Ok I signed up for a 30 mile ride... haven't biked in years... any training thoughts or tips?

Also, where can I get the "performance enhancers of choice"for a cyclist?
:bump:

smontanaro
March 26th, 2008, 03:30 PM
Saddle time. A 30-mile ride is no big deal. Your legs will likely be sore for a day or two, but your butt will be screaming for a day or two if you don't do a few shorter rides to get used to the saddle.

Skip

jim clemmons
March 26th, 2008, 03:33 PM
Also, where can I get the "performance enhancers of choice" for a cyclist?


That's called a "motor". Try Harley...

poolraat
March 26th, 2008, 04:47 PM
That's called a "motor". Try Harley...

For SS I think a moped is more in order. :bolt:

SearayPaul
March 26th, 2008, 08:30 PM
Downhill

orca1946
March 27th, 2008, 06:52 PM
Try going to the gym & ride for a time each day, then increase it every 5 days. Good luck & have fun!

That Guy
March 29th, 2008, 02:35 PM
On days when you don't feel like going 30 miles, start out by riding 15 miles in a straight line away from your house. Then you'll have no choice but to bike 15 more to get back home.

aztimm
March 30th, 2008, 01:00 AM
On days when you don't feel like going 30 miles, start out by riding 15 miles in a straight line away from your house. Then you'll have no choice but to bike 15 more to get back home.

That's a great philosophy, and I've used it to get my running distance up, and keep it up. I figure if I'm already 5 miles away, I might as well run back. Circle runs make it too easy to wimp out and stop early.

Slowswim
March 31st, 2008, 11:58 AM
Ok I signed up for a 30 mile ride... haven't biked in years... any training thoughts or tips?

Also, where can I get the "performance enhancers of choice"for a cyclist?
:bump:

How much time do you have to train?

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Jeffy_101
March 31st, 2008, 07:28 PM
The best thing you can do is make sure your seat is adjusted properly at a minimum, make sure the height is correct. Most beginners have their seats way too low.

Also, push a easier gear than you think you need. Work on maintaining a cadence of 80+.

SwimStud
April 1st, 2008, 08:48 AM
How much time do you have to train?

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It's in June. So I have time.

aquageek
April 1st, 2008, 12:28 PM
30 miles will be a cakewalk for you, will fly by. Most newer seats are easier on the backside. I don't suggest hitting it completely untrained but it definitely won't do you in. You should do it in well under 2 hours.

Karen Duggan
April 1st, 2008, 12:40 PM
My hubby and I went for a 10 mile ride a few weeks ago. It was not a big deal at all. Took about 45 min waiting at traffic lights, etc. I'd highly recommend "crotch and tushy" practice before hand- they were a little sore because I hadn't ridden in 8 years!
You'll do great 'Stud.

SwimStud
April 1st, 2008, 01:07 PM
I'm thinking that it might be worth investing $30 in a pair of ass-padded bike shorts...it's not like I don't already habitually wear ridculous looking lycra apparel!

aquageek
April 1st, 2008, 02:22 PM
The bike shorts are kind of a requirement. And, you'll be much better off with bike shoes and pedals.

Karen Duggan
April 1st, 2008, 02:58 PM
Make sure your seat is appropriately situated as well!

That Guy
April 2nd, 2008, 05:30 PM
I'm thinking that it might be worth investing $30 in a pair of ass-padded bike shorts...it's not like I don't already habitually wear ridculous looking lycra apparel!

Yeah, it's well worth it.

Blackbeard's Peg
April 8th, 2008, 01:20 PM
I'm thinking that it might be worth investing $30 in a pair of ass-padded bike shorts...it's not like I don't already habitually wear ridculous looking lycra apparel!

The bike shorts are kind of a requirement. And, you'll be much better off with bike shoes and pedals.

$30 may not be enough. I had to buy a cheap pair of $25 bike shorts one day when I forgot mine at home and those things have been gathering dust since their first and only run. Test a couple of pairs out in the store on a bike. The $45 pair I originally bought has been my workhorse and I'm never extraordinarily sore after a ride using them.

blainesapprentice
April 8th, 2008, 01:25 PM
What kind of bike are you going to be riding?

Kinda a thread hyjack, but does anyone know of any resources for getting decent used road bikes?

Ripple
April 8th, 2008, 02:18 PM
What kind of bike are you going to be riding?

Kinda a thread hyjack, but does anyone know of any resources for getting decent used road bikes?

Phone high end bike shops and ask if they take and sell trade-ins. You might even get a warrantee of sorts.
I've heard that carbon fiber frames have a shorter life span, so you might want to look at used steel, aluminum, or titanium frames.

aquageek
April 8th, 2008, 08:13 PM
Kinda a thread hyjack, but does anyone know of any resources for getting decent used road bikes?

Craigslist.com is the mecca for used bikes. Just make sure you aren't buying a stolen bike, ask for the owners manual or original receipt for any of the gear.

Also, most bigger cities have bike swap meets at least once annually. Or, go to a bigger group/charity ride. Folks are always selling bikes at those places.

SwimStud
April 8th, 2008, 08:18 PM
What kind of bike are you going to be riding?

Kinda a thread hyjack, but does anyone know of any resources for getting decent used road bikes?

Just an old Huffy...bit heavy but it's a flat course...I'll manage.

blainesapprentice
April 8th, 2008, 10:03 PM
thanks for the ideas guys! sounds great

aquageek
April 10th, 2008, 11:56 AM
Just an old Huffy...bit heavy but it's a flat course...I'll manage.

You are going to die. 30 miles on a heavy old huffy would be the equivalent of a 5K swim in board shorts and a scuba weight belt, maybe worse. Borrow a bike from someone.

SwimStud
April 10th, 2008, 12:10 PM
You are going to die. 30 miles on a heavy old huffy would be the equivalent of a 5K swim in board shorts and a scuba weight belt, maybe worse. Borrow a bike from someone.


It's a mountain bike...I might be able to buy a racer...

Jeffy_101
April 10th, 2008, 05:32 PM
Yeah, you could do it on the old huffy but it will be a huge handicap. If your huffy has what they consider to be "suspension" I would say no way. Too heavy, too inefficient and too much rolling resistance.

If you don't want a race-style bike at least get a hybrid. A quality hybrid will be much better than the huffer as they normally don't have suspension (which you don't want on the road) are lighter and have better wheels and tires for riding on pavement. Even a heavy old Schwinn Varsity will be better than a new mountain bike on the road.

blainesapprentice
April 10th, 2008, 06:45 PM
What do you guys think is an average mile time on a road bike?

Iwannafly
April 10th, 2008, 10:41 PM
What do you guys think is an average mile time on a road bike?

It depends on who you're talking about. Professional cyclists in a peloton can sustain 30 mph + for hours. So, 2 minutes per mile. Swimstud (or any other person for that matter) on an old Huffy mountain bike will work extremely hard to hold a 15 mph pace for anything more than 10 minutes. So, 4 minutes per mile. Mostly, it depends on who is riding, what they're riding and how far they're going. I think I saw Fabian Cancellara (the defending world Time Trial Champion) averaged 46 kph (28.5 mph) for a 26 km hilly course. I guess he's not really average though. Did I mention that I enjoyed the most PED plagued sport in the world?

SwimStud
April 19th, 2008, 02:48 PM
Well here she is weighing in at around 41lbs....

I can't believe how much racers are these days...and that there aren't any "cheap" ones.

Thrashing Slug
April 19th, 2008, 07:31 PM
You don't need a new bike. Just get a thinner saddle and some thinner tires. I did triathlons for two years on a hybrid bike set up that way, and I was fine.

I highly recommend wearing bike shorts. 30 miles without bike shorts could be extremely uncomfortable.

Ripple
April 19th, 2008, 10:15 PM
The rear suspension will eat up a lot of pedalling energy - there's a good reason why suspension systems never caught on with road racers. Thinner smoother tires might help.
As for prices of road bikes, they go quite cheaply second hand, even if they're barely used. A high quality second hand bike is a better buy than a poorer quality new one of the same price. (Don't go for used carbon fiber, it just doesn't have the same lifespan as steel or aluminum.) Or you could borrow one from someone you know who is about your height and has one stashed in the garage after a short-lived interest in triathlon or road racing. Sort of "try before you buy".
Here's an example of what you might be looking at, not that I'd recommend eBay as a source for bikes.
http://cgi.ebay.com/COLNAGO-TITANIO-BI-TITAN-TITANIUM-FRAME-FORK_W0QQitemZ250238761554QQihZ015QQcategoryZ98084 QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

SwimStud
April 25th, 2008, 04:48 AM
Well, I bought a used racer on ebay...

Rykno
April 25th, 2008, 05:56 AM
make sure you get a lot of riding time on it. it looks to have a different saddle as well as body to hand position. it might take some gettin' use to.

I moved my seat up about 1/2" up and 1/4" back about two weeks ago and I am still getting use to it.

aquageek
April 25th, 2008, 10:43 AM
I think you'll be much happier and you will probably find the ride quite EZ now that you have a road bike, especially if you can get in a group and draft.

I would suggest getting some cage for your pedals, at the very least. Trying the ride with those pedals will waste a lot of energy.

WPSWIMS
April 25th, 2008, 12:19 PM
Take your bike to a good bike shop and have someone look at your position.
Riding a bike that does not fit is like wearing shoes that do not fit. If you plan to ride many miles you really need a good fitting bike. It is worth paying for a good saddle, bike shorts, and cycling gloves. As you gain experience, you may want to get cleats...itmakes for much smoother and efficient pedaling.
Chamois cream (butt balm) is a life saver!

SwimStud
April 25th, 2008, 05:27 PM
Take your bike to a good bike shop and have someone look at your position.
Riding a bike that does not fit is like wearing shoes that do not fit. If you plan to ride many miles you really need a good fitting bike. It is worth paying for a good saddle, bike shorts, and cycling gloves. As you gain experience, you may want to get cleats...itmakes for much smoother and efficient pedaling.
Chamois cream (butt balm) is a life saver!

Well I'm buying the "Gel Cover" for the saddle; shorts; and getting the bike a once over at the shop before I do the charity ride (might put the stirrups on the pedals then). I don't see me biking a lot, but you never know it might become a good cross train for me.

WPSWIMS
April 25th, 2008, 09:48 PM
The Gel saddle covers are too squishy and will create saddle sores. You need a good firm saddle...less chafing. Ask your local bike shop to size you. Yes they come in various sizes depending on your rear bone structure. I do many long rides (metric centuries) back to back and had to try many different saddles until I found one that fit. I will be doing a 700 mile/10 day ride in June through North and South Dakota. Hope I can locate some pools...I did look at the last SWIM magazine to get some ideas!

Thrashing Slug
April 27th, 2008, 02:37 PM
I agree about the saddle. From the picture, the existing saddle looks pretty bad. Adding a gel cover will make it worse. Go to a decent bike shop where they will measure you and recommend a replacement saddle. Try to resist the urge for something that looks squishy and cushioned.

ensignada
April 28th, 2008, 02:32 PM
When you're at the bike shop getting your bike and saddle adjusted to you, ask for the contacts at local riding clubs. Most clubs have rides every weekend, some short, some long. You might enjoy training with a crowd for a change.

I agree with Geek that stirrups keep you from wasting energy, but I'd get comfortable riding first, then try the stirrups. When you feel one with the bike, then try cleats. I speak from painful experience. :cane:

Good bike shorts and a good saddle are a must, IMHO.

Chris Stevenson
April 28th, 2008, 04:27 PM
Well I'm buying the "Gel Cover" for the saddle; shorts; and getting the bike a once over at the shop before I do the charity ride (might put the stirrups on the pedals then). I don't see me biking a lot, but you never know it might become a good cross train for me.

Careful with the gel covers, particularly in combination with too-wide saddles. You might end up cutting circulation to...parts that might need it.

Softer is not necessarily better at all, in the long haul. Don't base your decision by comfort over a 5 minute period but over a 30+ minute period.

About the peddles...Geek is correct that clips will make you more efficient. Personally I find that clipless (clip-in) pedals are much safer -- far faster to get out of than clips -- but I can understand that not everyone will feel that way at first.

As an aside: the most bruises I've earned from clipless pedals were not due to me falling, but the beating I earned from my imprudent laughter when my wife fell. At a stop sign when she unclipped the wrong foot, something that is much more common than one might expect.

aquageek
April 29th, 2008, 09:45 AM
I agree with Geek that stirrups keep you from wasting energy, but I'd get comfortable riding first, then try the stirrups. When you feel one with the bike, then try cleats. I speak from painful experience.

Yeah, I've taken my fair share of falls. It takes a long time to get in the habit of clipping out, especially when you have to stop quickly.

Jeffy_101
May 1st, 2008, 01:40 PM
Your Peugeot is a MUCH better streetbike than that other thing...

Check out some platform Shimano SPDs. Relatively cheap and you can ride clipped in or not, depending on preference and shoes. Clipping in is to cycling what keeping your face in the water is to swimming.

You could try something like these...

http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/14234-240_WELD15-3-Parts-65-Pedals/Mountain/Wellgo-WAM-D10--Pedals.htm

SwimStud
May 1st, 2008, 04:16 PM
Well I dropped $100 on the Peugeot (might be pricey for a used bike but it seemed all the used ones were going around that mark) but I had one as a kid so I know it's decent. I probably just get it tuned up and buy some shorts. I'm only doing it for the charity ride.

Spending for shoes, pedals, and new saddles (provided the original is sound) is a bit overindulgent for my present needs and finances. I'll be glad not to be hauling the Huffy around.

Slid
May 2nd, 2008, 05:35 AM
Well I dropped $100 on the Peugeot (might be pricey for a used bike but it seemed all the used ones were going around that mark) but I had one as a kid so I know it's decent. I probably just get it tuned up and buy some shorts. I'm only doing it for the charity ride.

Spending for shoes, pedals, and new saddles (provided the original is sound) is a bit overindulgent for my present needs and finances. I'll be glad not to be hauling the Huffy around.

Don't skimp on the cycling shorts, unless you know somewhere you can buy a new backside for $25. Good luck, but you should be fine. 30 miles on a bike is time consuming rather than hard, even for a newbie.

SwimStud
June 16th, 2008, 12:03 PM
Haha well my ride is this weekend! I haven't trained a stitch and I am going to pay for it! LOL

Swimmy
June 16th, 2008, 02:13 PM
Haha well my ride is this weekend! I haven't trained a stitch and I am going to pay for it! LOL

:cheerleader:
Go, Studmuffin, Go!
:cheerleader:

SwimStud
June 16th, 2008, 02:15 PM
:cheerleader:
Go, Studmuffin, Go!
:cheerleader:

Will be more like soremuffins when I'm done :joker:

Slowswim
June 16th, 2008, 04:18 PM
SS:

Just take it easy, coast the down hills, and change your position on the saddle every few minutes.

I'm sure you'll be fine.

SwimStud
June 16th, 2008, 04:35 PM
SS:

Just take it easy, coast the down hills, and change your position on the saddle every few minutes.

I'm sure you'll be fine.

I'm told it's a flat course..and I'm not after a medal so I hope to be OK afterwards lol

SwimStud
June 22nd, 2008, 03:29 PM
Well I did the ride and it was a lot of fun. I am doing 60 mles next year.
I guess my swimming has me in greater shape than I anticipated.

CreamPuff
June 22nd, 2008, 03:39 PM
Well I did the ride and it was a lot of fun. I am doing 60 mles next year.
I guess my swimming has me in greater shape than I anticipated.

Nice job Stud! I can't bike worth beans. So after you do 60, it goes up to 120, right?

Slowswim
June 23rd, 2008, 01:41 PM
Well I did the ride and it was a lot of fun. I am doing 60 mles next year.
I guess my swimming has me in greater shape than I anticipated.

Just do an Ironman and get it over with. :eek:

Seriously, good job! :wine:
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SwimStud
June 23rd, 2008, 01:44 PM
Just do an Ironman and get it over with. :eek:

Seriously, good job! :wine:
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I don't know about that. I have it on good authority that I am physically a wreck and what not...

I am interested in doing a tri...I might walk the run, but still it'd be fun

swimshark
June 24th, 2008, 07:45 AM
Congrats on the ride!! Come on down here for a short tri. Muppet and I did one last Aug that was less than an hour long for me (a lot less for Muppet).

aquageek
June 24th, 2008, 10:10 AM
I am interested in doing a tri...I might walk the run, but still it'd be fun

The only thing fun about a tri is the swim and the car ride home. Between those two book-ended activities it's a heaping helping of misery and pain.

Well, another fun thing is observing the neurotic behavior of the triathletes.

Chris Stevenson
June 24th, 2008, 12:51 PM
Well, another fun thing is observing the neurotic behavior of the triathletes.

Good things we swimmers are so normal. :)

I can't run b/c of my knees -- my doctor shot me a horrified look when I floated the idea past him -- but I very occasionally do the swim-bike legs of triathlons.

So another fun thing is watching those triathletes starting their run -- the "iron man shuffle" is priceless (I say with great sympathy) -- while I hit the hospitality tent after racking my bike.

All jokes aside, I do admire the athletic ability and fitness level of (serious) triathletes. And yes, their training (and spending) habits can get pretty neurotic, though swimmers are seriously beginning to stray into tri territory with the tech suits.

SwimStud
June 24th, 2008, 04:53 PM
And yes, their training (and spending) habits can get pretty neurotic, though swimmers are seriously beginning to stray into tri territory with the tech suits.
Chris you're going to trigger a rant thread about suits with that kind of hanging bait ;)

That Guy
June 26th, 2008, 08:12 PM
So another fun thing is watching those triathletes starting their run -- the "iron man shuffle" is priceless (I say with great sympathy) -- while I hit the hospitality tent after racking my bike.

I just completed my second (and probably last) ironman last weekend. Ironman is basically an exercise in running a marathon when you're really tired. Last year I walked when the pain got absurd, resulting in a 4:09 run split. This year I forced myself to keep running, the result of which was a 3:45 split, some extreme leg pain/cramping, and a big overall time drop from last year, but a few minutes short of a Hawaii slot. I don't have any more triathlons on my calendar at the moment... I'm going to focus on swimming for a while and see if the desire to run ever comes back :)

swimshark
June 27th, 2008, 07:50 AM
I just completed my second (and probably last) ironman last weekend. Ironman is basically an exercise in running a marathon when you're really tired. Last year I walked when the pain got absurd, resulting in a 4:09 run split. This year I forced myself to keep running, the result of which was a 3:45 split, some extreme leg pain/cramping, and a big overall time drop from last year, but a few minutes short of a Hawaii slot. I don't have any more triathlons on my calendar at the moment... I'm going to focus on swimming for a while and see if the desire to run ever comes back :)

Did you do Couer d'Alene? A friend of mine did it as his first Ironman as well. My sister is doing Lake Placid again this year. I :notworthy: to all who do those races. Congrats on finishing!!

That Guy
June 27th, 2008, 09:59 AM
Did you do Couer d'Alene? A friend of mine did it as his first Ironman as well. My sister is doing Lake Placid again this year. I :notworthy: to all who do those races. Congrats on finishing!!

Thanks! Yes, I raced Coeur d'Alene. I have a new appreciation for the people who, every year, finish and then sign up for the next year immediately. After training for and racing the ironman distance two years in a row, I'm kind of burned out on the running and need a break.

Slowswim
June 27th, 2008, 03:39 PM
Congrats on the finish. A friend of mine did it. How was the swim in the cool water?

That Guy
June 27th, 2008, 06:38 PM
Congrats on the finish. A friend of mine did it. How was the swim in the cool water?

Thanks! The swim was fine. When I got there on Thursday it was cold enough to hurt and make me dizzy, but it warmed up 1-2 degrees every day and was 59 degrees on race morning. The water temperature didn't bother me at all.

swimshark
June 28th, 2008, 06:50 AM
Congrats!! I hear the weather was perfect.

After my sister did 1 Ironman a year for a while, she had to take a break from the training, too. I think she took off 1 or 2 years and then did one last year and again this year. I am amazed at what she has to do to train. Like running for 2 hours straight. No thanks!