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zegmal
April 25th, 2008, 01:58 PM
This is horrible. And, yes, I am totally freaked out. I swim in this area all the time as do my kids.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24313314/

tjburk
April 25th, 2008, 02:44 PM
I was surprised to hear about this...specially this early in the year when the water is still a bit nipply........Growing up out there, it just wasn't something that you didn't hear about much....

scyfreestyler
April 25th, 2008, 02:46 PM
These things happen.

Stillhere
April 25th, 2008, 03:18 PM
A month before I swam the Golden Gate Bridge Swim the first time in 1997, some poor surfer was bitten in half off his surf board off Pacific beach. They never found him, but his board washed up on shore with a 36 inch bite taken out of the board----I never heard the story until the morning of the swim when were lined up to go into the water---which made for some interesting thoughts during the crossing.

Mighty Minnow
April 25th, 2008, 03:44 PM
Another reason to stay away from Triathletes.....

:joker:

geochuck
April 25th, 2008, 04:15 PM
How many have swam in shark infested waters and actually have seen them. I have twice and it is scary.

USMSarah
April 25th, 2008, 04:26 PM
That is so awful, I watched the CNN report about an hour ago. I hope for the swimmers sake that he or she went quickly - I can't even imagine the pain from a shark attack.

quicksilver
April 25th, 2008, 05:46 PM
It's very rare and tragic.
Prayers go out to this poor man and his family.

Apparently there have been some stray seal pups coming ashore in the recent weeks (a primary food source).
Large great white sharks rarely come into the beach break, and prefer deeper colder waters.

We have them in the Atlantic off of Montauk Point.
And surfing alone, way off shore is always unnerving.

USMSarah
April 25th, 2008, 06:41 PM
It's very rare and tragic.
Prayers go out to this poor man and his family.

Apparently there have been some stray seal pups coming ashore in the recent weeks (a primary food source).
Large great white sharks rarely come into the beach break, and prefer deeper colder waters.

We have them in the Atlantic off of Montauk Point.
And surfing alone, way off shore is always unnerving.

As more articles come out, it brings tears to my eyes to hear the other swimmers describe what happened to him. I believe it said that sometimes females come into shallower waters to have babies... and they have to eat along the way... mistaking this man for a seal. How horrible. I almost can't stand to think about it.

smontanaro
April 25th, 2008, 06:55 PM
I believe it said that sometimes females come into shallower waters to have babies... and they have to eat along the way... mistaking this man for a seal.

This was a partial explanation for shark attacks in the movie Sharkwater (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0856008/) which I just watched a couple days ago. (Definitely worth renting, but it is disturbing to see what they do to these poor creatures.)

Skip

Spock
April 26th, 2008, 02:36 AM
I've lifeguarded this beach for 20 years and have swum in this area literally thousands of times, mostly alone. All those guys you see on CNN are my mates. Two of my buddies tried CPR on the poor gent, unsuccessfully.

I've always considered Solana some of the safest water in the U.S., which is why this is so hard to believe. It was in 25 feet of water over sand ... yes, it was near Tabletop reef which is about 10 feet deep or so and full of sea life, but he was hit over a sandy area that doesn't have much of anything to it (usually). We never see big fish out there. Seriously, the area where he was hit is a real dead zone.

I think it is just a random, bad luck, bad place at the wrong time case of mistaken identity. It is a classic white vs. sea lion attack behaviorally (rushed from the bottom, vicious hit, then waiting). Poor gent. I do not think it is a particularly dangerous area, shark-wise. In fact, I'm sure of it.

I hope no one starts calling for shark hunts. We enter wilderness at a certain (albeit small) risk.

Am I shaken up by this? Yes, absolutely. First thing I do when I return this summer? Swim that buoy alone.

3strokes
April 26th, 2008, 07:31 AM
Another reason to stay away from Triathletes.....

:joker:

Actually, that is one reason to swim WITH Triathletes. If a shark attacks, you (we) Masters swimmers can outswim them, the Triathletes, (as long as we keep them between the shark and us.)

DeletedAccount
April 26th, 2008, 09:30 AM
Spock,

Thanks for the extra info, it is appreciated.

T

Thrashing Slug
April 27th, 2008, 02:33 PM
Does anyone know what time of the day this occurred? As a fisherman I know that most fish tend to feed around dawn and dusk. I have always assumed it is the same with sharks. Consequently, I never swim in the ocean at those times. Even though it increases my chance of sunburn I always swim in the heat of the day, on those rare occasions when I'm visiting CA and have a place to swim. Same thing in NJ. I run on the beach in the mornings, but I never swim then.

Spock
April 27th, 2008, 03:22 PM
It occurred between 0700 and 0715.

Ripple
April 27th, 2008, 05:51 PM
...As a fisherman I know that most fish tend to feed around dawn and dusk. I have always assumed it is the same with sharks. Consequently, I never swim in the ocean at those times. Even though it increases my chance of sunburn I always swim in the heat of the day...

That is very useful information.

ViveBene
April 27th, 2008, 07:57 PM
Here's more info on shark feeding times and behavior: at dawn and dusk; attacks on humans more likely in cloudy, turbulent water where shark cannot make out prey (which partially supports wet suit looks like seal theory); attracted by movement at surface of water:

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,23509817-30417,00.html

A tragedy, and my respects to the swimmer's family and swim group.

VB