PDA

View Full Version : Form question



DESwim
May 5th, 2008, 11:55 AM
I have a quick form question. I know that are supposed to make an "s" shape underwater with your stroke when swimming free but how deep is the arm supposed to extend underwater? Is it supposed to stay on one plane just below the body or should the arm extend as deep as possible? Thanks

geochuck
May 5th, 2008, 12:09 PM
We have not extended as deep as possible since 1948.

The "S" Stroke a great inovation. Some still like to call it the "S" Stroko

The "I" stroke is a newer version of the "S" Stroke. When the shoulders roll the arms make an "S" but the "S" seems to be just a straight "I".

I like my stroke closer to the body and follow the black line on the bottom of the pool.

I am sure you will get many ideas here.

haffathot
May 5th, 2008, 03:52 PM
I have a quick form question. I know that are supposed to make an "s" shape underwater with your stroke when swimming free but how deep is the arm supposed to extend underwater? Is it supposed to stay on one plane just below the body or should the arm extend as deep as possible? Thanks

it's my understanding that part of the design of the S-Pull is not geared to propulsion as much as it is geared toward levitation. Essentially, by pulling in the S formation, you are creating a rush of water that pushes you up a little in the water. This creates less drag for your body as you pull through. That being said, and once your hand has begun to traverse your underside, you still want to pull the water within the jetstream that you have created around your body. Pulling water outside of that immediate area around your body will create drag as the part of your body outside the jetstream slows the entire body to the speed of the water pulled from outside the jetstream. Additionally, if your pull is too deep, your body won't get as much of a levitating effect, thereby canceling out one of the main benefits of the S-Pull: energy conservation.

--Sean

Edit: As LindsayNB has mentioned, Swimming World features a discussion with Ernie Maglischo, a noted swim physiologist and coach. As he explains, the levitation portion of the S-Pull that has been touted for so long is now being downplayed in favor of the natural benefit created by the longer, curvilinear, path your arm takes in an S-Pull. From this perspective, the energy conservation would largely be due to the reduced number of strokes necessary to traverse the pool when using longer strokes. Less recoveries equals less energy expended. Whether it is levitation or curvilinear path, though, I would still recommend moving your arms within your jetstream rather than outside your jetstream, since: a) digging deeper into the water requires that you expend a lot of energy pushing directionally down and then up rather than focusing your efforts on pushing back, and b) I don't think the additional time to dig your arm down and then bring it back up is justified by the amount, if any, your pull is augmented by pushing your arm against the higher resistance water.

abc
May 5th, 2008, 04:13 PM
There are better coaches than me on here, but from personal experience I would also say that it depends on what type of swimmer you are (i.e., sprint or distance). There's a difference in strokes between individuals who focus on all out power for short bursts and those who focus on efficiency for longer events. For me, there's a lot of shoulder roll and I reach pretty far down with a slight bend in my elbow. In my opinion, this kind of stroke requires more strength but generates more speed for shorter distances.

geochuck
May 5th, 2008, 08:40 PM
I am looking at sprinters and distance swimmers. What is the difference? I think not much.

Sprinters turnover faster there fore kick harder and faster.

I have put them into Dartswim and the difference is very minimal.

DESwim
May 6th, 2008, 01:40 PM
There are better coaches than me on here, but from personal experience I would also say that it depends on what type of swimmer you are (i.e., sprint or distance). There's a difference in strokes between individuals who focus on all out power for short bursts and those who focus on efficiency for longer events.

I'm an ocean lifeguard so I do both sprinting and distance. Any videos that demonstrate or teach proper form would be much appreciated

haffathot
May 6th, 2008, 01:46 PM
I'm an ocean lifeguard so I do both sprinting and distance. Any videos that demonstrate or teach proper form would be much appreciated

goswim.tv

swim.ee

those are two places i go for ideas on drills (goswim) or form (swim.ee).

--Sean