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swimshark
May 20th, 2008, 07:33 AM
Today's practice (age group) included swimming a total of 22 50's with a bucket tied to our waists and 50's without the bucket in between. It was a great workout that ended in doing a fast 50 all out for time. I did my best time ever in practice. So, can I could my yardage as extra for the GTD???:dunno::wiggle:

Does anyone else do this type of workout?

knelson
May 20th, 2008, 10:29 AM
I assume you mean a bucket attached to a pulley system, correct? Yes, we have those at the pool where I train and we use them sometimes. It's sort of like the old stretch cords except with the buckets it's more difficult for the entire length, not just the last portion.

slknight
May 20th, 2008, 10:42 AM
Yuck! I'm having a bad flashback to my college days when we used to swim with buckets tied around our waist. I hated it.

I don't know why you couldn't use your yardage for GTD. You still swam the same distance, right?

Rykno
May 20th, 2008, 01:25 PM
we have one guy at our pool that is totally into technic training and swims between 2000-2500 either breaststroke drills, or sprint. and freesytle and back stroke as warm up and warm down.

anyways, he ties a rope around his waist with the bucket 2-3 yards back and swim 25's he also swims with cordz. almost never against, mostly 15-20 with.

he has not improved much in the last 8-9 months. so not sure if he gets help from doing it or not.

I have had a cloth bucket, like a horse feeder that I pulled around the pool back in the early 90's, but I am not back to that level of training yet.

knelson
May 20th, 2008, 02:42 PM
So are we talking about literally dragging a bucket behind you in the water or a bucket on deck that is lifted via pulleys? I've seen people swimming with small parachutes, but never dragging an actual bucket. That sounds like way too much drag to allow you to keep good technique.

slknight
May 20th, 2008, 02:48 PM
So are we talking about literally dragging a bucket behind you in the water or a bucket on deck that is lifted via pulleys? I've seen people swimming with small parachutes, but never dragging an actual bucket. That sounds like way too much drag to allow you to keep good technique.

Actually dragging a bucket behind you in the water. :drown:

aquageek
May 20th, 2008, 02:49 PM
OK, how exactly does the bucket not sink? Is it because you are moving forward and it sort of stays afloat? Why not put some bricks in it and double the agony? How to turns work also? Wouldn't you push off right into the bucket?

knelson
May 20th, 2008, 02:53 PM
Why not put some bricks in it and double the agony?

I prefer to just swim with a diving brick duct taped to my waist :)

Allen Stark
May 20th, 2008, 02:56 PM
I prefer to just swim with a diving brick duct taped to my waist :)

No Kirk,you duct tape it to the back of your head to keep you head down in BR.

swimshark
May 20th, 2008, 03:18 PM
I think a brick would have worked just as well.

This was a 10" or so bucket with holes in the bottom tied to our waist with about a 3 foot long string. Turns were a joy. I had a hard time with them and often flipped, getting tangled in the string and while untangling, the bucket would hit me in the head. To make it more fun, we tallied how many times the bucket hit my head. The bucket almost won!

I don't just want to count the yardage for GTD, I want to double it!! :wiggle:

knelson
May 20th, 2008, 03:25 PM
I was thinking more along the lines of this: http://www.flocasts.org/floswimming/coverage.php?c=271&id=10526

You don't have to worry about the bucket hitting your head AND the bucket actually helps you in one direction!

swimshark
May 20th, 2008, 04:21 PM
Wow, that looks much nicer than a bucket hitting my head!

Chris Stevenson
May 20th, 2008, 06:29 PM
Our coach in high school used to make us swim with jean cut-offs, the pockets would balloon and act like parachutes, and the denim would absorb water and get heavy. It was torture, especially butterfly.

In the past I have seen belts with little mini-buckets or pockets but I've had trouble finding them now. I've actually been looking for something like that that is somewhat adjustable so I can do OW swims with a slower swimmer and still get a good workout. Anyone seen something like that?

Allen Stark
May 20th, 2008, 09:54 PM
In high school our coach had us swim in sweat suits and tennis shoes.I think it was a stupid idea as it pretty well messed up stroke mechanics,not to mention being really hard on the knees in breaststroke.Several years ago I had a drag suit that had big pockets sewn around it to catch water.The pockets would collapse on turns so it worked pretty well.

blainesapprentice
May 20th, 2008, 10:03 PM
Our coach in high school used to make us swim with jean cut-offs, the pockets would balloon and act like parachutes, and the denim would absorb water and get heavy. It was torture, especially butterfly.

In the past I have seen belts with little mini-buckets or pockets but I've had trouble finding them now. I've actually been looking for something like that that is somewhat adjustable so I can do OW swims with a slower swimmer and still get a good workout. Anyone seen something like that?

why not just use the parachutes that they sell for swimming--they come in many sizes so you can choose the resistency that would work best for your needs.

knelson
May 21st, 2008, 12:50 AM
you can choose the resistency

I believe you just coined a new word :)

swimshark
May 21st, 2008, 07:29 AM
Growing up, we did panty hose during summer league. It was nice to see growing boys in their moms old panty hose. :thhbbb:

ehoch
May 21st, 2008, 11:41 AM
Bucket - Parachute - T-shirt with pocket - sweatpants - tennis shoes - pulley system - tubing - anything to add resistance in the water is fine. Just watch out for those shoulders. If you are not ready for it, nothing will blow out your shoulders faster.

I swam with a parachute this season where you can adjust the size of the opening - that is the best cost / benefit for me.

scyfreestyler
May 21st, 2008, 02:27 PM
I swam with a parachute this season where you can adjust the size of the opening -

You mean, resistency, right? :rolleyes:

scyfreestyler
May 21st, 2008, 02:32 PM
On a more serious note, I once swam with some rubber surgical tubing around my waist across the pool and back. Getting across takes a significant amount of effort. So much so that it seemed I might not make it the last 5 yards. But what a reward when you do make it. That return swim is something else.