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View Full Version : The theory of relative warm-up



JMiller
May 28th, 2008, 02:08 AM
You know, the range of plausible warm-up
routines that might work for each person is
immense!

The reality isn't about how you warmed
up on race day, it's about how you trained.
If your body is prepared and ready to do a
race, you'll swim fast. Warming up
may help you get into that zone, but
if you didn't train properly you won't
swim your best.

Everyone has a routine they like to do,
and that is unique to each person, but
there isn't one absolute "right" answer
for every racing scenario. The best pre-
race plan should stay relative, directly
reflecting how you're feeling that day.
Focus on the circumstances you're attempting
to mitigate during those precious moments
before the race, and then you'll have
your answer.

For example, did your goggles just break,
does that $500 swim suit seem smaller, did
you just realize someone else might win
the race? Deal with it, swim easy, don't
stress. Or, do some crazy all-out warm-up,
whatever you need to feel at peace with those
things you can't change. The training is over,
the work has been done, now is the time to
let go of the past and put all of your energy
into the pool.

To swim your best, is to feel the joy
of success, that is entirely personal.
The final result is directly related
to the effort you've put into the
preparation, not the warm-up, and yes,
relatively speaking, everyone can win.

fanstone
May 28th, 2008, 10:27 AM
How is this for a warm-up:

Get up early, travel 100 miles on a motorcycle and swim 1,000 meters in a o.w. event, at 10:00 a.m.
Put on motorcycle clothes, go fast on motorcycle to another city 150 miles away, get there before 2 p.m. and just in time, swim 100 I.M. then 50 free...after all is over, get on bike and head home about 40 miles away.

hofffam
May 28th, 2008, 11:49 AM
"muscle memory" is one of the silliest things said about athletic skill. Muscles have no memory whatsoever. They have fibers that contract on command from the brain. Muscles don't remember how to swim correctly. Swimming technique is a learned response like brushing your teeth. The brain adapts to repetition and the skill becomes automatic over time.

Allen Stark
May 28th, 2008, 11:52 AM
I agree that the warm up you do should be the one that works for you.As a general rule I think you should do at least your regular warm up plus a little work at race pace and be sure you are comfortable with the turns.

smontanaro
May 28th, 2008, 11:59 AM
"muscle memory" is one of the silliest things said about athletic skill.

The memory of the movement (ordering of motor unit activation) is encoded in the brain and spinal cord. You have to call it something. People like alliteration, so "muscle memory" sounds better than "brain memory". It certainly seems more descriptive. Maybe "movement pattern memory" would be better still.

Skip

JMiller
May 28th, 2008, 12:43 PM
I edited that phrase... Although that does change the artistic intention...


"muscle memory" is one of the silliest things said about athletic skill. Muscles have no memory whatsoever. They have fibers that contract on command from the brain. Muscles don't remember how to swim correctly. Swimming technique is a learned response like brushing your teeth. The brain adapts to repetition and the skill becomes automatic over time.

pwolf66
May 28th, 2008, 03:35 PM
"muscle memory" is one of the silliest things said about athletic skill. Muscles have no memory whatsoever. They have fibers that contract on command from the brain. Muscles don't remember how to swim correctly. Swimming technique is a learned response like brushing your teeth. The brain adapts to repetition and the skill becomes automatic over time.

While you may be technically correct, the term 'muscle memory' is used to refer to the creation of the imprint (i.e how-do-i-do-this) of an action on the central nervous system.

quicksilver
May 28th, 2008, 04:02 PM
How is this for a warm-up:

Get up early, travel 100 miles on a motorcycle and swim 1,000 meters in a o.w. event, at 10:00 a.m.
Put on motorcycle clothes, go fast on motorcycle to another city 150 miles away, get there before 2 p.m. and just in time, swim 100 I.M. then 50 free...after all is over, get on bike and head home about 40 miles away.


A swimming biker. Or maybe a biking swimmer?
Throw in a run and you've got a new fangled triathlon.

Sounds like a great day.