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craiglll@yahoo.com
June 15th, 2008, 11:42 PM
On this day when some feel it is necessary to celebrate something people are supposed to do, I am thinking of going to grad school and finish this time. Finally all of my parental units have died and I have money to pay for grad school. That sounds more bitter than I intended it to sound.

I have lived where the teams are either too expensive (U of I for people not associated with the university is/was outrageously expensive) or there has been no team for too long. I want to do laps with others who want to do laps. I don't want to do laps where people don't complain about me swimming in there way as the piddle (my father's favorite word) down the lane doing something that looks like a breast stroke.

Here are the choices. I want to hear opinions -both good and bad.

Indianapolis (have friends)
Cleveland (as a kid a big Indians fan)
Phoenix (Did everyone see that they increased both their football & baseball budget? How does Ms. Love justify that?)
Northridge, CA (quaint)
San Francisco, Ca (looks like it might be more fun than it really is)
Portland, OR (Seattle-want-to-be)
Kansas City, MO ()
Denver, CO (Good friend lives there)
(The statements are from some one else not me)

The furthest west I've ever been is Iowa City, Topeka, San Antonio. I've lived in a small towns (Galesburg, IL the center of the universe and home of the Ferris Wheel), university/intellectual towns (Champaign/Urbana & Topeka, when Menninger was still there) and center cities with lots of suburbs. (DC, St. Louis, Houston). I've never lived in a suburb.

I think of the list only Northridge, CA is a suburb. I think Kansas City, MO is considered central city. To do this I am also thinking of buying a car. I'm 50 & never had one. I've been to Indy, Cleveland (it really has become a beautiful city), and Kansas City, MO (not the center of the universe as LDSers think).

Any response will be most welcomed.
Thanks a bill,
Craig

geochuck
June 15th, 2008, 11:50 PM
Any place that does not have hurricanes, tornados, floods or earthquakes. Near a body of water preferably the ocean. Where there are no mosquitos. Where the prevailing winds are westerly. It never gets too hot or too cold. Where university are not costly.

My grand daughter has selected Prince George BC, it does get cold in the winter but for value the school there is almost free. It is not on the ocean but the Fraser River runs close by.

ALM
June 15th, 2008, 11:54 PM
Any place that does not have hurricanes, tornados, floods or earthquakes. Near a body of water preferably the ocean. Where there are no mosquitos. Where the prevailing winds are westerly. It never gets too hot or too cold. Where university are not costly.

That settles it. Sounds like he's moving in with you, George. :bolt:

geochuck
June 15th, 2008, 11:57 PM
I just described Ladner BC where I live. http://www.britishcolumbia.com/regions/towns/?townID=3367

That settles it. Sounds like he's moving in with you, George. :bolt:

hofffam
June 16th, 2008, 01:35 PM
I really don't see why Austin TX is not on your list.

Several long lasting Masters teams of course.

Great quality of life for people of all ages. Everything from rural country space to urban high rise condos.

Cost of living low on a national scale. Warm of course most of the year. Fantastic music scene, artistic, and tech-geek at the same time. You can ignore the Longhorn t-shirt fans and overdone burnt orange all around town.

Nice airport... or drive 2-3 hours to San Antonio, DFW, and Houston.

swimshark
June 16th, 2008, 03:47 PM
Personally, I'd go for Portland, OR. You have the ocean about an hour away, the mountains all around, great swimming sites, great LMSC, good colleges, no sale tax, good climate, good people. Should I continue?:rofl:

Redbird Alum
June 16th, 2008, 04:18 PM
Craig -

Since you've never owned a car, you should cull your list down by looking into the public/mass transit options and availability (location and times) in the areas where you are interested. Also, moving away from city-centers to the burbs almost always removes the option of simply walking, and adds to your transit times, unless the burb is an older, established town in it's own right that was swallowed up by the megalopolis it is near.

Also, I would be interested in how many minutes/hours/days a week you find the car eats up if you make that transition wherever you may be bound.

Midas
June 16th, 2008, 04:49 PM
As to San Francisco, here are some quick pros and cons that I can think of off the top of my head:

Pros: San Francisco is a great city and Pacific Masters is the largest LMSC in the country, meaning there are many good teams to swim with around here (though not a ton of options *in* San Francisco--USF Masters seems to be the biggest) and pretty strong competition. There are great suburbs in and around San Francisco (like Marin, for example) which I would highly recommend if you don't like living in a city (I don't either). The city and its surrounding environs are beautiful. The city is metropolitan with diverse arts and a robust night life. The weather is very moderate all year round (never too cold in the winter, but never that warm in the summer). It doesn't rain almost at all from May through November (and not any more than any place else in the winter--it's not Seattle or Portland, which get dumped on during the winter). Most of the pools are outdoors (and heated) year-round, which is a great thing that only took a very short time for me to get used to. It's a very outdoors (and healthy) lifestyle around here. Open water swimming and triathlons are a very big deal. And some great skiing is only about 3.5 hours away at Lake Tahoe.

Cons: It is still super-expensive to live here. Rents have been going up and housing prices (in San Francisco and the closer suburbs, at least) have not been coming down much, if at all. Overall, the cost of living is high too. We may have some of the highest gas prices in the lower 48. If you like the ocean, San Francisco might not be for you. The water here is COLD. Like in the 50s cold. Even in the summer time. The beach itself is also usually very cold--like in the 60s and windy (and foggy). Not pleasant for sun bathing or swimming. Never mind the rip tide currents... (I understand the surfing is good, though, so long as you wear a wetsuit.) In fact, 60 degree days are not unusual all summer long, and that takes some getting used to. Earthquakes are somewhat of an issue, but no more so than hurricanes, tornadoes and flooding are elsewhere in the country.

anita
June 16th, 2008, 05:49 PM
Went to school at CSU Northridge...ewww. Cross that off your list as quick as you can. Any area in L.A. can never be definied as "quaint", no matter how thick the gates are.

Kurt Dickson
June 16th, 2008, 06:37 PM
It's not where you live, it's how you live.

Denver is good--grew up there. Only place I've lived where you could golf and ski in the same day.

Phoenix is good--Truly God's country (I saw Him today as I was finishing my bike ride in 112 temp this afternoon). Year around outside training is nice (bad for skin cancer). We are all kind of rude and impersonal here. I don't miss chipping ice off of my cars from Michigan winters.

California typifies the problems with all places--too many people. Nice place to visit--too expensive and crowded to stay--makes my adrenal glands swell.:)

Allen Stark
June 17th, 2008, 12:45 AM
The Portland area is great.Great LMSC,no poisonous snakes,very few mosquitoes,mountains,ocean,rivers,etc.Good mass transit.Very mild climate.Very unlikely to have a drought.Really only one down side,you won't see the sun from Nov to Mar.

Sandy Yaygo
June 17th, 2008, 01:27 AM
Northridge is very close to the center of the porn production world.

Portland is in a drought if it doesn't rain for a week. You'll be OK there, but they hate people from California.

Phoenix (presuming you mean the "suburb" Tempe, where ASU is located) is way hot for most people, but like a drug, very addictive. Scorpions and snakes, but few mosquitoes.

Indianapolis isn't what it used to be, after Dusenberg stopped building cars.

Shouldn't this thread be in the NSR area?

swimshark
June 17th, 2008, 08:01 AM
The Portland area is great.Great LMSC,no poisonous snakes,very few mosquitoes,mountains,ocean,rivers,etc.Good mass transit.Very mild climate.Very unlikely to have a drought.Really only one down side,you won't see the sun from Nov to Mar.

But when you do get the peak at the sun, there is usually a rainbow. Makes the rain all worth while!!

aquageek
June 17th, 2008, 08:29 AM
Have you considered the Triangle area of NC (Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh)? Three large and great universities to chose from, at least three USMS teams (maybe more), decent cost of living, 1.5-2.0 hours from the beach, 3 hours from mtns, year round golf, biking, and running. I think it still has the highest per capita PhDs in the world and tons and tons of Fortune 500 companies.

tjburk
June 17th, 2008, 10:00 AM
Savannah Georgia is a really nice place to live.....relatively cheaper compared to some of the other places listed. I have come to really like Georgia after growing up in SoCal....took a little getting used to but climate wise it's pretty reasonable.......The other palce I would like to live is around Cocoa Beach FL. A little touristy but not as bad as other places......

geochuck
June 17th, 2008, 10:27 AM
Craig have we made it easier for youto decide. If you like the cold Prince George BC has two great swim pools one is a fifty meter pool the other 25 meter pool. Housing is very low priced and it is the largest city in that far north in Canada. The University is very low cost and they allow foreign students. http://www.unbc.ca/politicalscience/
Fees are low http://www.unbc.ca/calendar/graduate/general/fees.html
Prince George BC http://www.bctravel.com/north/pg.html
Prince George 50 m pool http://www.swimmersguide.com/query/Detail.cfm?PoolID=9696

My town Ladner has 5 great pools within 20 minutes. A short stroll from my place an outdoor 25m pool, a 4 min bike ride a great 25 m indoor pool, 15 min drive another 25m pool and in Richmond BC a 13 min drive from my home a 50m indoor pool, a 20 min drive in Richmond a pool complex with 2 25 m pools. A 30 min drive 5 other 25m pools.

Renaissance Swimmer
June 17th, 2008, 10:47 AM
To get a better feel for Portland, consider a visit. The Oregon LMSC is hosting this summer's LC Masters Nationals. Read more about the meet, and the Portland area, in the Nationals thread: http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?t=9200

Leonard Jansen
June 17th, 2008, 01:05 PM
Why are you even considering any of these places? For quality of education and quality of life, there is only one place: Penn State.

www.psu.edu

Roar, Lions, Roar!

-LBJ

geochuck
June 17th, 2008, 01:17 PM
I think you would love to take walks around Ladner. You could be foot loose and fancy free. This couple found that a walk can give you stimulating side effects. 5th foot found in a running shoe. http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2008/06/16/bc-fifth-foot-found.html
Third foot http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2008/02/15/bc-third-right-foot.html
Fourth Foot http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2008/05/22/bc-severed-foot-richmond.html

USMSarah
June 18th, 2008, 01:04 AM
I have some comments about 3 of those cities.

Indy is one of the best sports towns in the United States. You have the Colts, Pacers, Indpls Ice & Indians, there's the Speedway, and of course, the IUPUI Natatorium... they have a great masters team IndySwimFit... plenty of meets in town and nearby cities. You can get to Purdue, Notre Dame, and IU in about an hour for some great college games.

Cleveland is a great place to live - the suburbs are great. Lakewood and Avon Lake are nice towns. Indians, Cavs and Browns games! Boating on Lake Erie is so much fun! Geagua Lake and Cedar Point are close by as well.

San Francisco is such a fun town to visit. Downtown is amazing - Chinatown and Fisherman's Wharf are the best! Very expensive place to live, but lots to do.

My :2cents:

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 18th, 2008, 06:42 PM
1. thank you for your replies. Far more than I expected.
2. the places indicated are places tht have graduate programs in the field I've worked in for 25 yrs. CSU Northridge has a new and very exciting program in Public Administration/Nonprofit Admin.
2. Surprising as it might seem, UT Austin doesn't have a good Public Admin and no Nonprofit. also, personally, I think Austin thinks too much of itself. in its Public Admin it tends to produce the very stereo type person I've been trying to stay away from, sorry. It alos has some of the highes pollen counts in the world. thank you Lady Bird for making it so beautiful!
3. I was once asked i a high school assembly wha tI wanted to be when I am 50 years old.. THE SMARTALICK THAT I AM I ANSWERED THAT I WANT TO BE MAKING MILLIONS IN PRON. Northridge is a really interesting place. I/ve looked at apartments.rent. many have a 55yr old restriction. I'm not 55 yrs old.
4. At Portland State, any enrolled student can qualify for housing in any dorm. Even as I understand it married students who will bring their family with them. It does have an interesting program with internships included.
5. Phoenix is a huge plus because it has a great center for Nonprofit Study. It offers both a MPA and a MNpS. I am looking to see if it can be a double major. Housing, as with the California colleges, is very expensive. I'm inheriting quite a bit of money but not a fortune.
6. the idea of going west is very weird to me. Delaware is so beautiful.

I could go on for hours. That's what makes this so difficult and why I've gone to discussion boards. I wan the program to be as difficult as possible. The undergraduate college I went to was Knox. Forbes just ranked it as 16 out of 200 as one of the best in the country. There are some swimmers throughout the country from Knox. There is even an All American who now coaches in a northern Chicago suburb. Some work at the IRS. It has great alum. The guy who was the FBI spy, John Podesta, It gave both Abraham Lincoln & Barack Obama their first honorary degrees. The first African American senator attended Knox. As did Mary Allen West. She is one of the two statues is Statuary Hall in the Capital for the State of Illinois.

Again thanks,
Craig

Paul Smith
June 18th, 2008, 06:53 PM
Craig,
After growing up in Northern California, going to school in Santa Barbara and staying a total of 8 years, then Colorado for 24 years were settled in Tempe (granted we've had a place here for about 8 years). Also, we travel regularly for business in UT, WY, ID, MT, NM, NV, NE.

Having said all that, this is by far the best place we have lived when it comes to weather, training opportunities, cost of living (surprised you said its expensive, PM me for more info). Is it hot for a few months a year? Yes, but nothing like the midwest or southeast where you have the horrible humidity.

People ask what we do when its 114 like today, we swim at 5:30am then use the AC in the house/car and enjoy later evenings when it drops down to the 90's. In Colorado we faced the same/yet opposite situation when temps for months are below freezing, you have the heating on when your inside and bundle up if you have to go out!

PS; Agree with you about Austin

geochuck
June 18th, 2008, 10:43 PM
6th foot found on the beach http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5iI4MPgOodb_9sJtyN7mrCW8Rv97A


I think you would love to take walks around Ladner. You could be foot loose and fancy free. This couple found that a walk can give you stimulating side effects. 5th foot found in a running shoe. http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2008/06/16/bc-fifth-foot-found.html
Third foot http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2008/02/15/bc-third-right-foot.html
Fourth Foot http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2008/05/22/bc-severed-foot-richmond.html

hofffam
June 19th, 2008, 10:31 AM
I think Austin thinks too much of itself.

I think SOME of Austin thinks too much of itself. Especially the University of Texas (e.g. "We're Texas").

The rest of Austin on the other hand, is quite relaxed and perfectly happy if no one else ever moves here. In my own view of the world - the City of Austin is too much of an activist government - hence I live outside of the city.

I don't pay much attention to the graduate school so it seems surprising that UT, located in the state capitol, doesn't have a good program for you. Oh well.

Good luck in any case.

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 20th, 2008, 08:56 PM
Again, ASU's graduate school is mostly downtown Phoenix. It seems very good. Norhtridge, some one has to have a god thing to say about it. the pictures look so beautifu. Portland Does it really rain a lot? I hate rain. I have a friend who grew up around Cleveland. He says CSU is beautiful. Good program Delaware. Its chic meter is rising very fast. SFU is very cheap for out of state students. Big Plus. I think ASU is the second highest and U od Colorado Denver is almost as expensive as Regis University which has a better program.

Paul Smith
June 20th, 2008, 09:16 PM
Again, ASU's graduate school is mostly downtown Phoenix. It seems very good. Norhtridge, some one has to have a god thing to say about it. the pictures look so beautifu. Portland Does it really rain a lot? I hate rain. I have a friend who grew up around Cleveland. He says CSU is beautiful. Good program Delaware. Its chic meter is rising very fast. SFU is very cheap for out of state students. Big Plus. I think ASU is the second highest and U od Colorado Denver is almost as expensive as Regis University which has a better program.


If the ASU grad school is at the new downtown campus (not the Tempe location) then you'll have access to the soon to be built Brophy swim facility. Brophy (formally Phoenix swim club) masters is coached by Mark Rankin and in my opinion is one of the finest masters clubs in the US...the "old" pool is beautiful, and having scene the plans for the new facility will be outstanding.

knelson
June 21st, 2008, 12:31 AM
Portland Does it really rain a lot? I hate rain.

Statistically I'm willing to bet Portland received the same or less average annual rain than Illinois. The thing is it all comes in th winter. You don't get a lot of sunny days from November to March in the Pacific Northwest. On the other hand you don't get any brutal cold, either, and not much snow. There are usually very few days per year where the high temp is below freezing.

Portland is a great city for public transit with their light rail system. Since Portland State is downtown it should make not having a car very doable. Anyone from Portland would sneer at the thought that Portland is a "Seattle wanna be."

swimshark
June 21st, 2008, 02:22 PM
Statistically I'm willing to bet Portland received the same or less average annual rain than Illinois. The thing is it all comes in th winter. You don't get a lot of sunny days from November to March in the Pacific Northwest. On the other hand you don't get any brutal cold, either, and not much snow. There are usually very few days per year where the high temp is below freezing.

True. I know Atlanta gets more rainfall over the course of a year than Portland does.

ensignada
June 22nd, 2008, 05:52 PM
SPEA at IUPUI has a great reputation.

I grew up in Indianapolis and my mom still lives there. Downtown Indianapolis now has fabulous places to live (real estate has not appreciated crazily like most of the country), great restaurants and plenty of sports. IndySwimFit (check out their website) has practices all over the city at all times of day. For more outdoor activities, there are a few nice state parks about an hours drive away.

Besides, Hoosiers are nice people. :wave:

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 25th, 2008, 11:03 PM
I'm starting a narrowing down movement. Here is what I think is left. San Francisco State, surprisingly cheap for out of state. ASU - Phoenix,, even thought they closed men's swimming and increase both the football and baseball budget. U Delaware. It has a wonderful international section to its nonprofit management course. Not may responses about it. also what abbout Rutgers? this is new to me and I have't really explored it. Portland State. I'm not sure why but one reason might be because they are very responsive when I've aske dquestions of them at the school. One really bad thing is that anyone who wants to live on campus goes into a big lottery. It means that me in a single suite could be living next to 6-8 freshman in their suite. Johns Hopkins though too expensive. My stepmother left me a wad but not that big of a wad. CSU NOrhtridge where I shall also begin my pronographic career. I'll have to come up with a good name. That's another thread.

Indy is very hard for me to think about although IUPUI is the best in nonprofit management in the world. I still remember when Richard Lugar, then mayor, said that what (he used a word I'm not going to use) .....,do is none of his concern. He was talking about African Americans living in the city he governed. The town is very conservative. And I am very not. That also makes me wonder about Phoenix. Also, i hate all of the Indy teams, especially the Colts.

Another place I really like is Delaware. I looked up the cities' standings in different things dealing with health. They are almost all on the bottom of the list. I've always thought Dover, Wilmington & Newark were very neat.

Illinois does receive a lot of rain. However, the U of I weather profs are still sticking to their guns about ending the year in a drought. But it also goes through long times of drought. When I was in college, Illinois was under a state wide drought that really got bad. Then it rqined a lot in 1992 and the entire levy system broke down like it is now. I lived in St. Louis. It rained there every day for the first 57 days I lived there. I hated that and also how little the people who lived there appreciated the city's beauty. One thing about Portland is that the people who've responded here and other threads on other discussion boards are so positive about the city.

ViveBene
June 26th, 2008, 12:30 AM
This is an interesting question. One theory holds that going to school in a crummy environment helps you put on blinders, focus maximally on the schoolwork, and get out of Dodge as soon as possible.

Chicago has an exceptional center called the Donors Forum that offers workshops in fundraising and nonprofit management. It is not a degree-granting institution but a remarkable institution to aid both donors and recipients of funds; any org in Chicago that begins a capital campaign goes first to the Donors Forum and follows the blueprint to a T. There are, partly as a consequence, several large development advisory firms that consult to nonprofits (e.g., Campbell and Co.).

Business schools such as Northwestern's have (I believe) a nonprofit management track. Northwestern is sometimes rated above U Chicago and its 43 recipients of Prize in Business named in honor of Nobel.

Also in Chicago, the Spertus Institute recently established a graduate degree program in nonprofit something.

Indiana University has a Center for Philanthropy; might that be on the IUPUI campus?

Cleveland is IMO an underrated city with good institutions.

Nonprofit management can become quite specific, with hospital management differing from, e.g., management of a natural history museum or a symphony orchestra or a school. Sometimes the program might want students to do an internship, so having resources right there in the city would be advantageous.

Good luck! Both in making the decision and in the graduate program.

VB

Ripple
June 26th, 2008, 07:37 AM
Don't let an :mooning: of a polititian put you off a particular city. Here in Alberta, we had a premier for many years who was a real embarrassment. People kept voting him in because they wanted the party he was affiliated with, not him. An cringe-inducing mayor doesn't necessarily reflect the attitudes of the majority of citizens.

Leonard Jansen
June 26th, 2008, 09:15 AM
U Delaware. It has a wonderful international section to its nonprofit management course. Not may responses about it. also what abbout Rutgers? this is new to me and I have't really explored it.

I grew up fairly close to Rutgers in NJ. It's a good school, but it's in New Jersey - fuhgeddaboutit unless you can handle the NJ mindset. (Example: You say "Excuse me, but is the 'Resolving Interpersonal Conflicts' course full this semester?" The response, in the local dialect is: "Yeah, you got a problem with that?" I actually LOVE going back to NJ because I get tired of the whole Pennsylvania repressed, passive-aggressive attitude. I also slip back in to my NJ accent. My wife, originally from western PA, looks on it as akin to being dropped off in Iraq without a weapon.) Of course, the good swimming news about Rutgers is that you have easy access to the Jersey shore and NYC and Connecticut open water races.

Most people I've known who went to U Delaware liked it and then got the h@ll out of Delaware once they graduated. It has reasonable access to open water races in NJ shore and Maryland.

I still say "PENN STATE."
-LBJ

geochuck
June 26th, 2008, 10:37 AM
I was told the Police in Delaware shoot first and ask questions later.

geochuck
June 26th, 2008, 10:40 AM
All Albertan politicians are embarrassing.


Don't let an :mooning: of a polititian put you off a particular city. Here in Alberta, we had a premier for many years who was a real embarrassment. People kept voting him in because they wanted the party he was affiliated with, not him. An cringe-inducing mayor doesn't necessarily reflect the attitudes of the majority of citizens.

Ripple
June 26th, 2008, 06:37 PM
All Albertan politician are embarrassing.
Whereas B.C. polititions are merely corrupt. :thhbbb:
(Which is apparently not embarrassing at all to their constituents.)

geochuck
June 26th, 2008, 06:55 PM
We love our drunken Politicians. We even voted him back in after he was caught DUI in Hawaii. In Canada DUI is a criminal offence but in the USA a misdemeanor. If he was convicted in Canada he would not have been allowed to run.

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 26th, 2008, 08:19 PM
I was thinking of Spertus but I don't really want to live in Illinois any longer/ I've taken the U of I Chicago Certificate. Some of it was wonderful some absolutely terrible. Donors forum's limitation about not having a degree is a true stopper. I don't understand why they didn't open the U of I Chicago into a degreed program. The on line program through U of I Springfield which begins this fall looks interesting until you realize it is basically Eastern's program online. I don't want a program that is limited to social service agencies. I've worked in everything from the continuing ed at the Smithsonian to children's museums to aid service organizations to Tuberculoses service where we went out to look for homeless Vets with the disease. I am really interested in looking at how people outside of the field see nonprofit organizations and how they choose which to support and/or use. UIPUI Center on Philanthropy is really wonderful. But Indy isn't much different than where i live now, only bigger and a better masters swimming program.

The major problem with Northwestern is it is extremely expensive. Also, one of my coworkers from the Smithsonian went there. She is conservative and loved it. A childhood friend went there for undergrad and left before she finished MBA degrees with nonprofit attached are sometimes developed so that the nonprofit interested student is sometimes looked down on by the other students.

The above mentioned idea is why ASU looks so good. It has 2 different ways to go. One is a MPA. And the other is MNpS through one of the centers that does nonprofit research. I think there must be some type of research center connected to the degree to make it really stand out to me. But they are very unresponsive to my questions.

Rutgers offers an international look at nonprofit organizations that is really wonderful. I personally would like to end my "career" working with organizations dedicated to removing land minds and stop their production. or with one that is working against the military build-up of the island nations of southeast Pacific and Indian Ocean.

I've always liked Delaware when I would be driving through it to go see the Cubs in Phillie or New York when I lived in DC. We once stayed in Dover for two days. I really miss living in DC. I lived there for 10 years. It destroyed my lungs. The entire bay area is so great but I don't want to go through the problem again.

Thanks. I really appreciate the comments. They add much to my decision making

Craig

ViveBene
June 27th, 2008, 04:18 PM
Hi -
I am thinking of moving to DC, and wonder how it destroyed your lungs? That would pretty effectively rule out a longish stay for me.

The international flavor to your thinking brought to mind Geneva, which has headquarters for many interesting international orgs, such as Medecins sans Frontiers and the UN. The Council on Foundations Web site lists interesting jobs with such orgs.

U of I Chicago is still in the long process of building its graduate programs and has experienced major disruptive events over the past few years. High-maintenance profs and deans coming to great fanfare and leaving shortly thereafter to less.

Thanks for any info on DC problems.

VB

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 30th, 2008, 02:00 AM
Washington DC has weird weather. Systems get stuck there and traps the car pollution. I still love it and think of it as my adult hometown. You have to give them a lot of credit because they have managed to really make the neighborhood change.

U of I Chicago has a new President. She used to be the Dean for a Social Worker school some where like Michigan. It is amazing how expensive the schools in Chicago are. Spertus is more expensive than is Harvard. I am beginning to that most of them think way too much of themselves. How can any class be worth more than $4,000?

I had a really good friend inDc whose wife worked for Medicin Sans Pays. i have another friend who lives in Geneva and works for UNESCO.

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 30th, 2008, 02:16 AM
Penn State has no program. That is a reason it isn't on the list. I wonder if "the go to some place with a bad environment" is why so many come here to the U of I. Do you know, I think, that there is only 1 female African American in the entire graduate Engineering School? U of I has institutionalized racism so deeply into its structure it will never get rid of it. I can't believe that people still believe humans should be objectified. I wonder if a school called itself the Fighting Rapist (go Bobby Knight. I won't go anywhere where he has gone as a student or taught) or the Fighting Irish (oh sorry they do), how people would think of that. We objectify only what fits our needs. It is still racism. I went to a college that had a Indian funny name as its mascot. I am very proud we got rid of it.

Mascots make going certain places very hard.

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 13th, 2008, 05:20 PM
Here is an update.

First UT does have a nonprofit management program. It is deeply buried in the LBJ school. The tuition is for out-of-state students is over $17,500 per term. That makes it one of the most expensive state universities in the nation. One year would probably be over $50,000. That is if I can live while barely eating and not pay for any of my asthma drug while living in a very small cardboard box down by the river. it seems to me that out-of-state students are not thinking when they go there. Out-of-state grad students are actually paying for one or two in-state undergrad students.

Top choice seems to be UCLA, 2nd IUPUI, the top ranked but still concerned Indy being so conservative is really an issue. The third choice would be ASU, it is connected to a really innovative research center. Third choice is San Francisco State University. It is surprising cheap making the city affordable. Fourth choice is probably either Cleveland State or Case Western. Both are so much alike I wonder how they manage to stay individual entities. When I told a friend this he said back to me, "Yeah but then you are still in Cleveland." Then on of the CSU schools in the LA area. George Washington would be next, back when the renamed the Er in the old hospital for President Reagan many of the ER doctors believed that it should have been renamed for me one of the most frequent flyers of the 1980s. Then followed by Rutgers then finishing the list is U of Delaware. George, I have a cousin who lives in Vancouver. I have only met her one time. She is in her 70s. Canada isn't really a choice.

More updates to come. I am beginning to worry about GRE. i haven't taken a multiple choice test since I was a freshman in college and the first GRE I took.

ViveBene
July 13th, 2008, 05:39 PM
Hi -
Sounds like you're narrowing things down. Cleveland IMO is not so bad; it has institutions, lakes, terrain, and a ball club. In any case, buried in books you won't notice much about the city itself.

The GRE review courses may be helpful, especially ones that provide practice test situations.

Your statement - preparation and goals -- is extremely important.

Idle thought drifting: international relations?

Good luck!