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xxsprint
July 10th, 2008, 08:06 PM
I come from a running background, just now getting into swimming. In running, one usually trains alternating hard/easy days - for example, 10x400 one day, few miles easy the next, tempo run the next, easy the next, etc. This is to make sure the body does not get injured or overly fatigued. I have heard that in swimming, one usually does hard interval-type workouts (such as 10x100, for example) each day, and usually there are no strictly recovery days. Obviously with swimming, there is not hard strike of the foot on the ground as there is in running, but I am wondering how swimmers do not get overtrained or overly fatigued (doesnt lactic acid still build up in swimming intervals?) when constantly doing these intervals daily. Perhaps I just have a misunderstanding.

Thank you for your help.

Shaman
July 10th, 2008, 08:45 PM
They do get over-trained. It's a huge issue in the sport, though less so than I think it used to be.

ehoch
July 10th, 2008, 08:58 PM
The problem is not really the hard / easy days -- swimmers do this as well -- the problem is what is done before and after the hard sets and what is considered an "easy day".

You mention the 10x400 for track -- that equals 10x100 in swimming - let's say the runner and swimmer do this on a 3 minute interval going for the best 10 swim average. This would be about the same set -- but here is the difference - the runner will do about a 30 minute warm-up and run maybe 15 minutes easy afterwards. Swimmers will warm-up on land by stretching - swim about a 2000 warm-up set, do a 1500 "heart-rate set", then do the 10x100, followed by about 2-3000 pull and kick as a "warm-down.

The easy day as a runner is a few miles -- well that the same in swimming - they will swim 4-5 miles on the "easy day" ....

The Fortress
July 10th, 2008, 09:14 PM
I have heard that in swimming, one usually does hard interval-type workouts (such as 10x100, for example) each day, and usually there are no strictly recovery days. Obviously with swimming, there is not hard strike of the foot on the ground as there is in running, but I am wondering how swimmers do not get overtrained or overly fatigued (doesnt lactic acid still build up in swimming intervals?) when constantly doing these intervals daily. Perhaps I just have a misunderstanding.

Thank you for your help.

I don't believe most masters swimmers train like this. It would certainly cause me to feel overtrained. And although swimmers don't have the foot strike, they have the shoulder slam, so overtraining can still easily lead to injuries. Workouts and recovery are somewhat age dependent as well.

Uh, and if you're a sprinter, you really don't need to train like that.

4-5 miles on an "easy" day, Hoch?!

xxsprint
July 10th, 2008, 09:25 PM
whats the shoulder slam?

nyswimmer
July 10th, 2008, 10:28 PM
whats the shoulder slam?

The arm strokes put stress on your shoulders. The repetitive stress, especially if your stroke has flaws (like most of us not named Phelps) can strain the ligaments, tendons and muscles in your shoulder. Doctors even call it "swimmer's shoulder." :toohurt: