PDA

View Full Version : Calling all triathletes - current and former



elise526
July 19th, 2008, 06:46 PM
I love to swim sprints in a masters meet but I also have enjoyed doing triathlons. It is very difficult to train for both. I'd love to hear from folks that compete in both masters meets and triathlons to learn how they balance training and competing in both.

Paul Smith
July 19th, 2008, 07:08 PM
I love to swim sprints in a masters meet but I also have enjoyed doing triathlons.

Sacrilege!!

Contact Geek for the updated "Idiots Guide to Training for Triathlons for Former USS/College Swimmers"

Rule #3; you are not allowed to swim any meet event under the 400/500 free and if caught swimming a 50 will be forced to turn in any paddles, fins, pull buoys, oversize goggles and bumper stickers that say my other car is a Cervelo".

PS: I'm very disturbed that a mother would be so selfish to swim in BOTH swim meets & do Triathlons. :thhbbb:

SwimStud
July 19th, 2008, 07:40 PM
I love to swim sprints in a masters meet but I also have enjoyed doing triathlons. It is very difficult to train for both. I'd love to hear from folks that compete in both masters meets and triathlons to learn how they balance training and competing in both.

Don't do Tri's but do some OW. I put 1 workout a week in of 6 x 500 on 1 min or less rest.

elise526
July 19th, 2008, 08:11 PM
Sacrilege!!

PS: I'm very disturbed that a mother would be so selfish to swim in BOTH swim meets & do Triathlons. :thhbbb:

Don't tell anyone! I figured I had that coming!:oldman:

elise526
July 19th, 2008, 08:14 PM
Don't do Tri's but do some OW. I put 1 workout a week in of 6 x 500 on 1 min or less rest.

Thanks, SwimStud. I may just adopt your workout.

swimshark
July 19th, 2008, 08:16 PM
I don't call myself a real triathlete but I have done 2 in the last year. For me, I usually swim 3 days a week. Then I run 1-2 days a week and I take spin class 1 day. I'm not good by any means but that is how I balance it all out. My main focus is and always will be swimming in meets, though.

Now my sister is doing her annual Ironman tomorrow in Lake Placid. :cheerleader: She trains for hours a day to get ready. But she doesn't really do masters meets any more. She has in the past but it just got too much with training for her main thing - Ironmans.

Paul Smith
July 19th, 2008, 08:36 PM
I coach a number of triathletes...and not one single one has ANY interest in swimming in a swim meet. I can understand the mindset...but have tried to explain that racing is racing and so many multisport athletes right ff the swim leg...or think the best thing they can do is just bang our more mileage to try and get better. Enter meets, race almost every weekend whether that's a 5k run, a 100 mile ride or the 1500 at your local meet...IMHO.

An interesting article published in the current issue of ASCA by Scott Volkers an elite swim coach from Brisbane, Australia. I like what he has to say about Speed…listen up all you Triathletes, open water swimmers and distance swimmers who do not believe that speed work is important…your wrong!! A sample of the article:

“ Train like you race. If someone was to ask me what happens in Queensland compared to a lot of places, why do we go well? Across the board I think we train like we race. I have been pushing that for about 16 years in Queensland, about speed. Speed is important. Speed is the most important thing now. If you do not have speed you are in the wrong event. Look at Grant Hackett. He goes 49 (long course meters) for a 100 freestyle and he is going to swim 1500. If your best is 53, you are a little bit behind on the first lap. Then he can’t hang with any of the toughest guys around”.

elise526
July 19th, 2008, 09:07 PM
I don't call myself a real triathlete but I have done 2 in the last year. For me, I usually swim 3 days a week. Then I run 1-2 days a week and I take spin class 1 day. I'm not good by any means but that is how I balance it all out. My main focus is and always will be swimming in meets, though.

Now my sister is doing her annual Ironman tomorrow in Lake Placid. :cheerleader: She trains for hours a day to get ready. But she doesn't really do masters meets any more. She has in the past but it just got too much with training for her main thing - Ironmans.

Your balance sounds like a great one. How many miles do you run each time?

Good luck to your sis!

elise526
July 19th, 2008, 09:33 PM
I coach a number of triathletes...and not one single one has ANY interest in swimming in a swim meet. I can understand the mindset...but have tried to explain that racing is racing and so many multisport athletes right ff the swim leg...or think the best thing they can do is just bang our more mileage to try and get better. Enter meets, race almost every weekend whether that's a 5k run, a 100 mile ride or the 1500 at your local meet...IMHO.

An interesting article published in the current issue of ASCA by Scott Volkers an elite swim coach from Brisbane, Australia. I like what he has to say about Speed…listen up all you Triathletes, open water swimmers and distance swimmers who do not believe that speed work is important…your wrong!!


Paul, that has also been my experience with some triathletes that don't have a swimming background. I coached a masters group for eight years that was primarily made up of triathletes. I explained to them that doing a straight 2000 each time you practice the swim will not get you anywhere. Some had a difficult time understanding why we did drills, 25s, 50s, 100s , and 300s. Also, some didn't understand that swimming is very technical and takes time to master. Some would get frustrated when they weren't swimming fast times after just one year.

In defense of several triathletes I have coached, I did get several to swim in a masters meet and they loved it! Of the ones that did not do a masters meet, several expressed that they would not have a chance going up against all the former college swimmers. I can see how for folks that have never competed in swimming, the masters scene might be a little intimidating. Emphasizing participation in masters meet as a team effort has gotten some to the scene. They very much enjoyed being part of relays and contributing to the overall success of the team through individual events.

That Guy
July 20th, 2008, 12:46 PM
Swimming crawlstroke in a wetsuit is incredibly easy compared to training butterfly. My training strategy has been to let my biking and running comprise my slow aerobic training. So in the pool, I work mainly on butterfly, and to a lesser extent, medley. I don't do crawlstroke sets in the pool. I do very little open water swimming. At triathlons I use the swim as a warmup and have been first out of the water more than once. At Masters meets I am prepared for the events I actually care about, fly and medley.

elise526
July 20th, 2008, 01:08 PM
Swimming crawlstroke in a wetsuit is incredibly easy compared to training butterfly. My training strategy has been to let my biking and running comprise my slow aerobic training. So in the pool, I work mainly on butterfly, and to a lesser extent, medley. I don't do crawlstroke sets in the pool. I do very little open water swimming. At triathlons I use the swim as a warmup and have been first out of the water more than once. At Masters meets I am prepared for the events I actually care about, fly and medley.

Wow! Sounds like a smart way to go about it! Will you share some of the fly and medley sets? Also, how much biking and running do you do each week and what type of workouts?

amyro1234
July 20th, 2008, 01:10 PM
I do triathlons along with the swim team too. What I normally do is go for a short run or bike ride in the morning. I then go to swim practice in the evenings. During the weekends, I usally do longer runs or bike rides.

I focus on swimming most of the winter, since that is when swim season is for me. I do less biking and running during this time- and more swimming.

During the summer, however, there are a lot less swim meets going on, so I try to focus more on triathlons.

I'm not an expert by any means though. I have only done 4 triathlons so far- this year is my second season.

elise526
July 20th, 2008, 01:17 PM
I do triathlons along with the swim team too. What I normally do is go for a short run or bike ride in the morning. I then go to swim practice in the evenings. During the weekends, I usally do longer runs or bike rides.

I focus on swimming most of the winter, since that is when swim season is for me. I do less biking and running during this time- and more swimming.

During the summer, however, there are a lot less swim meets going on, so I try to focus more on triathlons.

I'm not an expert by any means though. I have only done 4 triathlons so far- this year is my second season.

This makes so much sense!! How long are your runs and bikes when you are doubling up? I'm thinking about trying this to see if my body will handle it.

swimshark
July 20th, 2008, 02:55 PM
Your balance sounds like a great one. How many miles do you run each time?

Good luck to your sis!

When I have done tris, they are short ones (1.5-2.1 miles) so when I run, I only run 2.5 miles at the most. Running is my weakest and slowest part of the tri.

Right now my sister is done with the swim and bike and ranked 11th over all. She's doing well!

aquageek
July 20th, 2008, 07:32 PM
I swim 4X a week, spin/bike 3 times and run out of a sense of guilt. I try to double up twice a week and usually lift on bike days also. All of this explains why my results are rather pathetic but I can't give up swimming. I started doing tris b/c of the many variables with pool closures (annual maintenance, storms, chemical issues, kids pooping in pool, etc). Also, I do them to annoy the Smiths, mission accomplished on that.

elise526
July 20th, 2008, 07:58 PM
I swim 4X a week, spin/bike 3 times and run out of a sense of guilt. I try to double up twice a week and usually lift on bike days also. All of this explains why my results are rather pathetic but I can't give up swimming. I started doing tris b/c of the many variables with pool closures (annual maintenance, storms, chemical issues, kids pooping in pool, etc). Also, I do them to annoy the Smiths, mission accomplished on that.

Thanks for the info! Can relate to what you are saying about pool issues. It is hard for me to not want to get outside when the weather warms up. I really should just be swimming due to a medical condition I have, but it just seems I can't give up idea of doing a triathlon again. The running is the main problem so I have tried doing an aquabike race at a triathlon and it was fun!

Swimshark - How did your sis do today?

amyro1234
July 20th, 2008, 08:01 PM
This makes so much sense!! How long are your runs and bikes when you are doubling up? I'm thinking about trying this to see if my body will handle it.
When I double up, my bike rides and runs are about 45 min each. My swim practices in the night time are around 1:20. It makes it so much easier to fit the workouts in if you do some in the morning and some at night! It is also not that hard for your body to handle either- you just have to get used to it. What distance triathlon are you training for?

elise526
July 20th, 2008, 09:13 PM
Thanks, Amy! It has been a little bit of time since I have done one. When I used to do them, I got a bit carried away with my training. Overtraining is an understatement! I would like to stick with the sprint ones - 1/2 mile swim, 16 mile bike, and 3 or 4 miles run max.

I really like the sound of your training plan. It sounds like one that would get me in good shape to do the distances I'm thinking about doing.

Just to give you an idea of how crazy I used to be, I would get up at 6 on Sunday morning and ride two hours. At 2 p.m. that same day and during the heat of the summer, I would go run 10 miles on a flat, smooth surface. I was only training to do a sprint triathlon. Doing stuff like what I mention ran me into the ground, so I'm trying to approach this from a realistic and sane point of view. The info I'm getting here is great!!

That Guy
July 21st, 2008, 01:24 AM
Wow! Sounds like a smart way to go about it! Will you share some of the fly and medley sets? Also, how much biking and running do you do each week and what type of workouts?

Typical fly sets:
3 x (4 x 50 on 1:00, then easy 100 on 2:00)
24 x 25 on :30
100-75-50-25 on same base interval, repeat... maybe :P
200-150-100-50 <--- He's lying, that's not typical at all!!!

Typical medley sets:
10 x 100 on 1:30
5 x 200 on 3:00
400-300-200-100 on same base interval

Typical bike week: 100-130 miles. During peak training I will double that, but not for more than a couple weeks at a time. Commute rides M-F with a big ride on Saturday.

Typical run week: varies. My tri season is over so I'm at about 8-12 miles a week for the foreseeable future. Ramping up for next tri season, I will jump up to 25-35 miles/week, with Tues-Sat runs around 5 miles each and then a long Sunday run. I've learned the hard way that anything more than about 35 miles breaks me down too much. As they say, your mileage may vary...

aztimm
July 21st, 2008, 11:47 AM
There's a fantastic story in the latest issue of, "Popular Science," about Andy Potts, and his training for the olympics:
http://www.popsci.com/entertainment-gaming/article/2008-07/making-olympian

I thought it interesting how he and his coach are so fixated on training at a high heart rate and energy usage.

elise526
July 21st, 2008, 01:20 PM
Aztimm- Great article!

That Guy - Wow! I'd hate to be a male racing you in a triathlon! With that great base, I bet you are an animal! Am I correct in thinking that you have done half-ironman and ironman distances? Any plans to do an ironman in the near future?

Any folks out there use an online coach or a website to get training plans? If so, would love to get some suggestions.

Any folks out there have any suggestions on HR monitors - brands, usage, etc.?

P.S. That Guy - Am I allowed to do one-arm fly on those fly sets?

aquageek
July 21st, 2008, 01:35 PM
Swimmers are not allowed to wear HR monitors. That is fully crossing over to the stupid tri gear side of life.

That Guy
July 21st, 2008, 02:01 PM
Aztimm- Great article!

That Guy - Wow! I'd hate to be a male racing you in a triathlon! With that great base, I bet you are an animal! Am I correct in thinking that you have done half-ironman and ironman distances? Any plans to do an ironman in the near future?

Any folks out there use an online coach or a website to get training plans? If so, would love to get some suggestions.

Any folks out there have any suggestions on HR monitors - brands, usage, etc.?

P.S. That Guy - Am I allowed to do one-arm fly on those fly sets?

Thanks Elise! Yes, I've done two half irons and two irons. I don't have anything planned for next year however.

I don't do one-arm fly unless I'm doing stroke drills; those aren't stroke drill sets :)

That Guy
July 21st, 2008, 02:05 PM
Swimmers are not allowed to wear HR monitors. That is fully crossing over to the stupid tri gear side of life.

Yeah, wearing a HR monitor in the pool is automatic fail. Somebody at my gym wears one though I haven't seen him there in a while. It's great - over and over again, he stops every 25-50 yards to slide the monitor up from his navel to his chest. :rofl:

Chris Stevenson
July 21st, 2008, 02:29 PM
Elisa,

I often like doing fly in workouts -- if I happen to be training with people significantly slower than me, changing "free" to "fly" is the simplest way to make an easy interval/workout much more challenging.

However, be a little wary of the effect on your shoulders. Some people's shoulders can't handle lots of butterfly volume. I would ease into it.

Rather than one-arm fly, I would suggest alternating fly/free by 25s, or something similar.

Chris

elise526
July 21st, 2008, 08:18 PM
Elisa,

I often like doing fly in workouts -- if I happen to be training with people significantly slower than me, changing "free" to "fly" is the simplest way to make an easy interval/workout much more challenging.

However, be a little wary of the effect on your shoulders. Some people's shoulders can't handle lots of butterfly volume. I would ease into it.

Rather than one-arm fly, I would suggest alternating fly/free by 25s, or something similar.

Chris

Thanks, Chris. I will try your suggestion. I am not quite the animal That Guy is!

swimshark
July 22nd, 2008, 07:40 AM
Yeah, wearing a HR monitor in the pool is automatic fail. Somebody at my gym wears one though I haven't seen him there in a while. It's great - over and over again, he stops every 25-50 yards to slide the monitor up from his navel to his chest. :rofl:

To answer the original question, Polar makes great HR monitors. You can find good, inexpensive ones at Performance Bike.

As for wearing them in the water... one saved my dad's life. He noticed that his heart rate wasn't going up properly while running. A few weeks later he had triple by pass. It was a genetic defect an unavoidable and could have been a widow maker! Now he wears it whenever he exercises to make sure his heart is doing well.

elise526
July 22nd, 2008, 10:12 AM
To answer the original question, Polar makes great HR monitors. You can find good, inexpensive ones at Performance Bike.

As for wearing them in the water... one saved my dad's life. He noticed that his heart rate wasn't going up properly while running. A few weeks later he had triple by pass. It was a genetic defect an unavoidable and could have been a widow maker! Now he wears it whenever he exercises to make sure his heart is doing well.

Thank goodness your dad had one on! I likewise have a medical condition that affects my heart and have found the HR monitor to be an invaluable tool. I was curious to hear about what other brands folks were using because some monitors are better than others. Also, I've heard that some hold up better than others in the water. I've always heard good things about Polar.

Chris Stevenson
July 22nd, 2008, 10:18 AM
I have never been able to keep a HR monitor on while swimming (not to mention pushing off the wall). I've only tried it with Polar monitors, all failed miserably.

Women can use the suit to keep it in place; for the men here who use them, what monitor do you use?

Thrashing Slug
July 22nd, 2008, 12:06 PM
Hey, maybe that's the purpose of the ubiquitous Mankini - to keep the heart rate monitor in place. :lmao:


On the original point.. I too am a triathlete, although swimming is definitely my favorite of the three disciplines. This past winter I stopped biking entirely except for the occasional ride on the trainer. I swam between 3 and 5 times a week, ran maybe 2 to 3 times a week, and lifted weights. I did a few swim meets in the spring. Then I switched over to "triathlon mode". Started commuting on the bike, doing long rides on the weekends, bricks. Simultaneously kicked up the run training - more intervals, speedwork, hills, and threshold runs.. while ratcheting down the swimming. No more 4 or 5X a week, no more breaststroke-specific days. :( Started doing some open water swims, both with and without the wetsuit.

All of this seems to be working pretty well, because my results from the sprint triathlon on Sunday were 10 minutes better than last year's last sprint. That really isn't as great as it sounds, last year was a slow year because I worked too much and trained inconsistently. Also I can probably attribute around 2 minutes to the new bike chain which no longer pops off on hills.. Still, it is good to know I'm on the right track, and I haven't been injured in a long while. Overall I like my current balance of training. I've got my bike speed back and I'm gradually getting more comfortable with running.

I wouldn't necessarily recommend my "training plan" to any triathletes, since it involves ignoring the bike for 4 months. For me it's not a problem since biking is my strongest suit and I do a whole lot of kicking and fin swimming. I find that legwork in the pool translates pretty well to the bike, but nothing carries over to the run. The only thing that improves my running is running. Other people's results may vary. For me, it is a worthwhile trade-off so I can focus more on swimming during the winter.

swimshark
July 22nd, 2008, 03:48 PM
I have never been able to keep a HR monitor on while swimming (not to mention pushing off the wall). I've only tried it with Polar monitors, all failed miserably.

Women can use the suit to keep it in place; for the men here who use them, what monitor do you use?

My dad keeps his on some how and only wears bottoms when swimming. He has a Polar - 2 in fact. I'm so thankful he wears his.

Blackbeard's Peg
July 22nd, 2008, 04:28 PM
Swimmers are not allowed to wear HR monitors. That is fully crossing over to the stupid tri gear side of life.

I disagree - HR training can be very valuable to swimmers. They would be valuable on such things as threshold sets, or descend to x% sets.
Heck, how about recovery days - if your HR goes above xxx, you're working too hard.

aquageek
July 22nd, 2008, 04:42 PM
I disagree - HR training can be very valuable to swimmers. They would be valuable on such things as threshold sets, or descend to x% sets.
Heck, how about recovery days - if your HR goes above xxx, you're working too hard.

Turn in your USMS card, you are now banned! If you can't find your card, look in Stud's Euro Man Carry All purse. I figure he has a few of those given his recent love of the needlepoint.

elise526
July 22nd, 2008, 04:56 PM
Turn in your USMS card, you are now banned!

Um --- some of us wouldn't be able to train for USMS competition if we did not monitor our HR while training. When your heart rate is too high, you can hear the watch beep at you, even underwater.

I have used a Timex/Ironman and it worked pretty well until some water got into it somehow after 8 months of no problems.

It is kind of cool to see what your average HR is over the entire workout and to see how many calories you have burned. When you see a total of 1000 calories burned, you feel o.k. about having dessert after dinner that night.

aquageek
July 22nd, 2008, 05:51 PM
Um --- some of us wouldn't be able to train for USMS competition if we did not monitor our HR while training.

Huh? That's nonsensical. It's not like you can't swim without one. A good friend told me he carries his HR monitor with him at all times, his index finger, the ability to count to six and then multiply by 10. Much cheaper.

Enough of this tri junk, let's get back to swimming.

scyfreestyler
July 22nd, 2008, 06:01 PM
Huh? That's nonsensical. It's not like you can't swim without one. A good friend told me he carries his HR monitor with him at all times, his index finger, the ability to count to six and then multiply by 10. Much cheaper.


Funny thing, I do the same when I am interested in my HR while at the pool. Can't beat the convenience. :cool:

elise526
July 22nd, 2008, 07:47 PM
Huh? That's nonsensical. It's not like you can't swim without one. A good friend told me he carries his HR monitor with him at all times, his index finger, the ability to count to six and then multiply by 10. Much cheaper.



Hard to use your index finger and take your pulse while you are swimming a 200 fly. No fun when you are on an adrenalin surge to have to stop in the middle of the swim and see what your HR is. All you need to hear is the little beep telling you to slow down, slow down before you blow a fuse.

Try it, guys. The worst thing that can happen to you is that you might look like an "uncool" triathlete. Would the world come to an end? :wiggle:

aquageek
July 22nd, 2008, 08:12 PM
Would the world come to an end? :wiggle:

Probably.

I don't need a gizmo to tell me how hard I'm working during a swim, the clock is enough at the end.

elise526
July 22nd, 2008, 08:24 PM
Probably.

I don't need a gizmo to tell me how hard I'm working during a swim, the clock is enough at the end.


Now, now Geek. Don't be closed-minded. Go back and read the article submitted by aztimm.

UGA #1!

Blackbeard's Peg
July 23rd, 2008, 02:54 PM
Turn in your USMS card, you are now banned! If you can't find your card, look in Stud's Euro Man Carry All purse. I figure he has a few of those given his recent love of the needlepoint.

I do own a HR Monitor. Certainly not the watch style folks are talking about using in the pool (I do the finger thing when doing HR sets). It came with the computer gizmo I bought for my bike 2 or 3 years ago.

For the record, I've used it once. :oldman:

elise526
July 23rd, 2008, 05:40 PM
Thrashing Slug - I agree with you that the bike and the swim seem to help each other, particularly in the kick sets. One of my favorite sets is 10 x 100 dolphin kick on 2:00 or 5 x 100 dolphin kick on 1:45 (no fins of course!). This seems to really work my core and my legs. Great job on your race this past Sunday!

Blackbeard's Peg - Maybe we can get you to join the small group of us that wear an HR monitor when we swim.

I'm a big believer in the HR monitor because like swimshark's dad, it helped identify an underlying medical condition. I started doing triathlons in 2000-2001 and really got hooked. By 2003, I was actually starting to get decent at them and thus, had big goals and big dreams. Starting in 2004, however, my performance started to decline dramatically to the point I had to walk the run of the last triathlon I did in 2006. I did not understand what was wrong. I tried backing off, etc. and nothing seemed to work.

I got my answer one night when I was wearing my HR while running on the treadmill. I had finished my run, been off the treadmill for 20 minutes, and was talking to somebody when I looked down and noticed that my HR was 140! I thought it strange and figured my HR was broken, but when I felt my wrist, my pulse rate was out the roof for somebody just standing still having a conversation. I had a friend take it and he got in he neighborhood of 140. When I sat down, it dropped to 60 in 15 seconds (my resting HR is 50). When I stood back up, it jumped to 136 in 1 minute and stayed up that high while I was just standing still.

Anyway, to make a long story short (I know this is a long post already), I was diagnosed with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), a malfunction of the autonomic nervous system. My cardiologist is a swimmer and a triathlete, so he has been very understanding of my situation. Many with my diagnosis are put on beta blockers but my doc said this would change my VO2 max. He felt I could continue to compete and not take beta blockers if I was very diligent about monitoring my HR while training and staying well-hydrated.

I've done three masters meets since I was diagnosed 2 years ago, but have yet to do a triathlon. It was a challenge to train to swim at Nationals and not make too much of a fool out of myself. I'm hoping now to take on the challenge of training to compete in a short, sprint triathlon.

Willow
July 25th, 2008, 11:28 AM
Elise,

I'd like to hear more about your experience with the AquaBike event you mentioned doing. I am medically not permitted to run either due to a spinal deformity, but I can swim and bike fine. I come from a family of ultra-marathoners and Ironmen/women and I feel a little left out. Can you tell us a little more about your AquaBike experience?

Thanks, Willow

elise526
July 25th, 2008, 11:49 AM
Elise,

I'd like to hear more about your experience with the AquaBike event you mentioned doing. I am medically not permitted to run either due to a spinal deformity, but I can swim and bike fine. I come from a family of ultra-marathoners and Ironmen/women and I feel a little left out. Can you tell us a little more about your AquaBike experience?

Thanks, Willow

Willow - You will love the aquabike event as much as I did. Many hosts of triathlons are now incorporating this event into the triathlon. It is treated like a separate category such as masters, beginner, clydesdale, etc. within the triathlon, so you are only scored against other folks doing the aquabike. You start the triathlon at the same time as the folks doing the full triathlon. The only difference is that your race is over as soon as you cross the line into the bike/run transition area. Kind of nice that you get to be done while everybody else has to take off for the run.

USAT came up with this idea three years ago to encourage folks to stay in competition who were not able to run because of a variety of reasons. It seems to have been successful so far and the field grows each year. You will find it at many half-ironman events and even on sprint triathlon events.

Give it a shot!

Willow
July 25th, 2008, 11:55 AM
Yay! I have my eye on the Vineman Half Iron distance for next summer. It will be so fun to do an event with family members!

Chris Stevenson
July 25th, 2008, 11:56 AM
Elise,

I'd like to hear more about your experience with the AquaBike event you mentioned doing. I am medically not permitted to run either due to a spinal deformity, but I can swim and bike fine. I come from a family of ultra-marathoners and Ironmen/women and I feel a little left out. Can you tell us a little more about your AquaBike experience?

Thanks, Willow

Sorry for jumping in here...USAT recently has started sanctioning these kind of events. See:

http://www.usatriathlon.org/MultiSport101/Sports/OtherDisciplines.aspx

I can't run either (bad knees) and I've done a few of these events, usually either Olympic distance or IM 70.3 distance. It is fun to head to the hospitality tent after racking your bike.

The number of local/regional opportunities to do aquabike races (they go by various other names sometimes) are increasing in this area; as baby boomers age and get more (running) injuries I suspect the popularity will increase even more.

Of course some triathlete purists don't like the event.

Willow
July 25th, 2008, 12:43 PM
Of course some triathlete purists don't like the event.

Yeah, I have been snooping around online and run across some pretty nasty elitism regarding the Aquabike. Oh well, when those folks blow out their knees or get visited by the arthritis fairy, they will undoubtedly throw their full support into such events, and probably want to exclude anyone who CAN run from them.

Willow
July 25th, 2008, 12:50 PM
Oh and thanks for that link Chris. It looks like the Vineman is the one for me. It is the only one on the west coast! You swim in the Russian River!

Trichica
July 25th, 2008, 01:08 PM
I am a triathlete who when she grows up, wants to be a swimmer!!!

I wanted to do tris at the age of 40--big problem--did not know how to swim (at all--not even put face in water) or ride a bike. Learned to do both. But, my swim coach after a year invited me to swim with him at a local masters.

I thought I was going to die. However, the masters coach said to me at the end of practice, see you on Monday. Three years later--still on that masters team. In the winter swim with the team 3-4 times a week; in the summer, I swim twice a week with team and on weekends in open water.

Yes, when I grow up, I want to do a swim meet. Go back to the top--I just learned how to swim....so our AWESOME director of Masters, Patrick Cantrell held a clinic for us because I did not know how to dive or do flip turns and I asked him to help find a place where I could learn. He did help me enormously and I am hoping next season to be able to do both well enough to enter a meet.

As for tri training, on the off days, I lift, spin and run. I do sprint and oly tris, so that is enough for me. Now, in the summer, on weekends, I go for a ride (and my other car happens to be a cervelo) and then run and then hit the local pool or the bay depending on the weather.

The swimming helps me because of my knees. I can only take so much pounding and I mash on the bike. Swimming relieves the stress.

I love swimming and appreciate masters and what it has to offer. I get annoyed when people say to the coach, but I would rather do yardage rather than sets for my upcoming tri. My response would be, that is why we also have a tri swim team and there are open lanes.

Our masters team also has some killer tri folks on it who do IM distances and several who place in national tris.....but they do the sets and love them.

I think it depends on you and what you enjoy the most. I am not out to win at the tris, just to do better than last time and stay fit. As for swimming, I cannot get enough or learn enough. I want so badly to be a better swimmer.

I am an attorney and so I work out every day at 5:00 am even on weekends. By 8:00, someone is just about starting to look for me.

Good luck--you can do both. I train with many excellent triathletes who also particpate in swim meets.