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View Full Version : Been Lurking a bit. Thought I'd say Howdy.



skydivingdan
August 28th, 2008, 09:58 PM
Howdy!

There its been said :p

Anyway I swam on a summer swim team for a year in Jr High (seems like such a long time ago.) I had a lot of fun doing it but couldn't continue due to scheduling problems. And I haven't really been in a pool for other than recreational swimming since then... That was until last month when I decided that this year I would try the swim option of the Navy's PT test. Figured I'd give it a shot so I started swimming laps trying to get ready for it... and I'm LOVING it so far. I'm exhausted when I leave the pool after my work outs (which would probably be more like some of yalls warmups since its been a while) but in some strange way I feel better getting out of the pool than when I did going in.
i was actually wondering though since the pool I have been swimming in is closed until the 18th for resurfacing... what are some good dry land type things I can do? Yoga? Stretches? Weights?
And for once the pool reopens what is the best way learn better techniques/different strokes? I'm sure getting a coach would be the best bet, but I'd need one that'd work for beer :p
Oh well mainly just wanted to say Howdy to everyone and say that I'm glad I've stumbled upon this site. Have had a good time reading it so far and look forward to continuing.

Thanks
Dan

bud
August 29th, 2008, 12:35 AM
.... what are some good dry land type things I can do? Yoga? Stretches? Weights? .... what is the best way learn better techniques/different strokes? I'm sure getting a coach would be the best bet, but I'd need one that'd work for beer....
Welcome.

Yoga, particularly Hatha (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatha_Yoga), is fantastic. There are a lot of similarities between Yoga and Swimming, especially at a fundamental level. Both are about engaging core strength, being both flexible and strong, a lot of focus on breath! (see: Pranayama (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pranayama), related to Yoga.) Most important is balance and body position (asanas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asana) for Yoga, streamlining for swimming).

Stretching and weights are great too. Lots of info here and elsewhere on the web about dry land training (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=dry+land+training+swimming).

You can get fairly far by self-coaching in swimming, but it is a lot of work. If you can get videos of yourself, upload them somewhere like youtube, and post the link here you will typically get lots of feedback. There have been several threads here on the topic, try searching the archives.

Here are a few posts/threads, etc., that have some good sources to get you started on self-coaching.
Freestyle Stroke Technique (http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?p=140860#post140860) ... this post too (http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?p=140634#post140634)
Flotation & Buoyancy... Streamlining & Balance (http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?p=113482#post113482)

The H2Ouston Swims (http://www.h2oustonswims.org/articles_whole.html) web (Coach Emmett Hines) and the Swimming Tips & Advice (http://www.svl.ch/svlimmat_ratind.html) web are great sources that will keep you busy for a long time.

Have fun with it!

You can always ask questions here.

Keep hanging out on this board.

....

anita
August 29th, 2008, 10:00 AM
... what are some good dry land type things I can do? Yoga? Stretches? Weights?


Pilates, pilates, pilates

pwb
August 29th, 2008, 10:14 AM
Howdy!
what are some good dry land type things I can do? Yoga? Stretches? Weights?
And for once the pool reopens what is the best way learn better techniques/different strokes?

Dan,

Ditto on yoga ... I've found that many yoga studios have a "flow yoga" that's great. A lot of the big sports club that will offer yoga might call it "fitness yoga" or something like that.

On technique, I think you should really check out Total Immersion at www.totalimmersion.net. Not only do they have great articles, books and video, they offer numerous clinics around the country. I've found this to be the best focus on technique -- how to improve efficiency in the water -- and their approach is very tuned to Master's swimmers.