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swim25
September 17th, 2008, 12:41 AM
I have been swimming in the pool at my new school and the pool is kept somewhere in the low 70's. Since I moved from my hometown to school I haven't been swimming as frequently as I was before, still twice a week at least. Does anyone know if a cold pool effects your ability, my times are slower and I never seem to get warmed up during a workout.

Warren
September 17th, 2008, 08:12 AM
the water heater broke one time at my ymca and it was in the low 70's aswell. I thought that the cold water made me tired faster.

You need to tell them to heat it up. Unless you are training for open water there is no reason for the pool to be that cold.

ViveBene
September 17th, 2008, 08:35 AM
I prefer cool water for lap swimming or workouts - something that makes me shiver a bit when I get in, so I have to jump around on deck first to warm up the system.

So, if you are unsuccessful in getting water nearer your desired temp, I do think some on-deck exercises will help.

VB

:groovy: (like this )

Treebox
September 17th, 2008, 08:37 AM
Sign me up! Where's your pool? Cold water for me any day instead of the rediculously high temps (>85) at the YMCA I swam at until a month ago. I finally had enough and found a new pool and new Masters team.

I always feel better in water around 75. High water temp combined with the generally high air temp on the pool deck wears me out.

Tree

Lump
September 17th, 2008, 08:58 AM
For practice I always preferred pools to be right about 80. For competition I like it cooler, anywhere from 76-80.

Don't know if its mental, but cooler water always feel easier to pull for me, warm water is like syrup once you get warmed up. Its also hard to cool down. I was a distance swimmer too, so I didn't spend nearly as much time on the walls as sprinters!

MindTrikSwimmer
September 17th, 2008, 12:53 PM
Ours is around 80...sometimes I get the shivers when the fan is running or the door is open though...HERE is a question...what is better...cold shower same temp as the pool, luke warm shower or hot shower before swim....as it relates to a shower before getting in...

aztimm
September 17th, 2008, 12:59 PM
It was probably just a few weeks ago that we were complaining about the water being too warm....and now some of us (myself included) are comlaining it is too cold. The heat is starting to break here in the Phoenix area, mornings are a pleasant 75. Monday morning the aerators were on, and the water was very chilly. I'd guess the water temp is about 77 when we start at 6am.

If I'm doing a distance set, I'd rather it be a bit chilly when I get in. After warming up, and getting into our main set, it felt great. I was thankful at the end that the water was a bit cool. But if you are sprinting with long rests, it wouldn't be too pleasant.

anita
September 17th, 2008, 01:15 PM
I get earaches if the water is too cold, so while I do prefer cooler water for workouts and meets, there is a point where it's too cold.
There is one pool here in San Diego that always gave me earaches during meets. HATE that pool still.
That said, having to take a cold shower after working out is ridiculous, too.

james lucas
September 17th, 2008, 01:38 PM
Am I nuts, or did the NCAA rules in the late 1960s / early 1970s call for water temperatures in the low 70s? Today's NCAA rulebook calls for temperatures from 79-81 F ...

Treebox
September 17th, 2008, 02:20 PM
James,

I think you are correct. AAU was the same. 70-79 degrees for sanctioned meets.

ddunbar
September 17th, 2008, 03:50 PM
Oh how I remember those summer 8:00 practices out in West Texas. The operator was always having to make up water volume lost in evaporation and a slow pool leak. Temperatures were always in the low 70s and there were always several blue-lipped shivering lane monkeys with no body fat hugging the ladder or hanging onto the gutters.

We did a 10k postal swim one summer in our masters program and I had to pull a swimmer /triathlete that was getting hypothermic. He had lost count, could not speak clearly, and had gone past the blue lips. He was unhappy to be pulled but understood why.

haroldbuck
September 17th, 2008, 04:44 PM
We did a 10k postal swim one summer in our masters program and I had to pull a swimmer /triathlete that was getting hypothermic. He had lost count, could not speak clearly, and had gone past the blue lips. He was unhappy to be pulled but understood why.

That reminds me of the triathlete during the bike portion of Ironman Wisconsin who told a volunteer that he didn't want to quit, but he wanted someone to come and give him an IV! (It was 93 degrees, windy, and humid. They pulled him off the course.)