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Leonard Jansen
September 25th, 2008, 07:27 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080924/hl_nm/us_asthma_swimminghealth_1

-LBJ

elise526
September 25th, 2008, 03:19 PM
I am curious to know, however, if the benefits of swimming for asthmatics outweigh the costs of increased exposure to chlorine. I was born with asthma and as long as I was swimming on a regular basis, did not need an inhaler. It was when I stopped swimming that I seemed to need the inhaler more.

Obviously, being around chlorine for the long-term is not good as I see more and more masters swimmers being diagnosed in their thirties with asthma. I do, however, wonder what my quality of life as an asthmatic would have during my pre-teen and teen years had I not been swimming.

swimcat
September 26th, 2008, 10:39 AM
i breath worse in indoor pools because of no air circulation. i used to swim outdoors in fl. and breathed a little better. the indoor pools have mold which aggravates most asthmatics(let me also add outdoor ones probably do too). i breath the best in the ocean. must be the salt water.

how about bromine pools?:

craiglll@yahoo.com
September 27th, 2008, 12:16 PM
The article, unless I missed it, doesn't explain how the researchers came to the conclusion that swallowing pool water is a factor of promoting an asthma incident. Nor did it seem to discount all environment, social and personal factors. Several years ago, there was a study that came to the conclusion that asthmatics who were athletic were less likely to use their medications as directed when they are participating in sports. This article also doesn't dismiss the simple explanation used for years that exercise can be a factor in producing an asthma incident. I don't know this but is chlorine a protein? I think it isn't. I think the product that is produced when individuals urinate in a chlorinated pool is when there is a protein. Chemist help. You can't be allergic to something if it isn't a protein.

Several years ago there was a great study published in Lancet that stated that asthmatic swimmers have changes in their bronchial passages that neither nonasthmatic swimmers nor ashtmatic nonswimmers don't have.