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abc
October 6th, 2008, 01:45 PM
We were goofing around after practice the other day and decided to see who could swim the farthest underwater. We both went well over 50 meters (the underwater turn was a killer). I opted for dolphin kicking a ways and then switched to the underwater breastroke. Iím not sure which technique is better for distance as opposed to speed. Anyone out there ever make a full 100m underwater? Oh yeah, this can be dangerous because a lot of people pass out. So if you make an attempt, be sure someone is on deck watching you. Perhaps some of you dorks could even put on your competitions suits and monofins and see if it improves your performance. You guys kill me with all your equipment.

Hoosier
October 6th, 2008, 01:56 PM
On my daughters Age Group Swim team, this was a drill. Until one girl passed out trying to go furthur (for the first time I saw a guard go after someone at SWIM practice)....dont do it anymore. VERY dangerous

abc
October 6th, 2008, 02:02 PM
Enough with the excuses. Someone make a run at 100m. Sure, you could die, but you will be forever immortalized on this message board. What more do you need?

Warren
October 6th, 2008, 02:03 PM
iv done 75 meters.


I think the world record is somthing like 187 meters with a monofin.

pwolf66
October 6th, 2008, 02:05 PM
I will go a 50m free no breathe at least once a week. This is more of a moderate speed drill than a see how far I can go. I use these to work on efficient strokes and focusing on not over-exhaling on the flip turn. It's not something I'm interested in doing to see how far as I don't think it proves much.

Paul

abc
October 6th, 2008, 02:07 PM
Also, I'm not interested in people sucking on an oxygen mask and then making an attempt while wearing a trolling motor. This has to be a "natural" attempt. 75m is pretty good but 25m short of the goal. I'm curious to know if the distance people would be better at this. I would also agree that this doesn't prove much, but nohting in swimming or athletics really does for that matter. If you're the fastest in the world in the 100m breastroke, what does it matter in the grand scheme of things?

Redbird Alum
October 6th, 2008, 02:16 PM
Whatever you decide, just do not hyperventilate prior to starting this madness... it's dangerous enough as it is.

A certain level of CO2 is necessary in the lungs to ensure your natural instinct to breath is maintained, if you hyper before you start, you could well pass out, sink to the bottom, and then unconsciously start "breathing" water when the CO2 levels reach their trigger point in your lungs. That would make rescue even more difficult on the poor lifeguard.

Mary1912
October 6th, 2008, 02:18 PM
I once did 50 yards free without a breath. The turn was killer. I'll never forget it. My lungs were bursting at the end, but I never forgot that I accomplished it. But I never have had a desire to do it again.

Leonard Jansen
October 6th, 2008, 02:19 PM
Without fins, the world record is 186m for men and 149m for women.

There may not be any real correlation between distance swimmers and distances achieved underwater. Generally, endurance athletes tend into two rough categories - athletes with lower VO2 max values, but higher efficiency (e.g. often the case with marathoners) and high VO2 max values but lower efficiency. I'm the latter and could probably get 30 - 35 meters only if my life depended on it.

-LBJ

Midas
October 6th, 2008, 02:20 PM
I did it back in my youth. I doubt I could do it now. I did long and steady breastroke pulldowns/kicks. The trick was to say calm and smooth (once you go into panic, you're toast). I'm a breaststroker with a relatively strong kick so I'm sure that helped a ton. Also, I just HAD to beat that girl who kept with me for the first 85 meters or so!

Back in the day, we had no idea how dangerous this could be. Fortunately, nobody passed out when we did it (it was at an aquatic "field day" sort of thing held at our summer pool club).

I'll still do 50's underwater in the yards pool I swim in. I don't go crazy with hyperventilating or anything and I always do it with other people watching.

jim thornton
October 6th, 2008, 02:32 PM
Our Y has signs posted about not holding your breath. So when I suggest we do breath control sets, I always caution my fellow anaerobic bacteria to surface when they start to see a swarm of black dots overtaking their visual field.

When i was a lifeguard almost 30 years ago, I swam underwater the length of a 50 m pool, made the turn, and swam maybe 10 or 15 meters more.

Now, the most I usually try is 2 lengths of a 25 yard pool underwater, which I tend to do twice or at most three times in the course of a relay "game" we occasionally play.

I don't think breathholding says much about the kind of shape you are in, because the fastest guy on our team needs all kinds of air, and I, apparently, do not.

As ABCs suggestion itself may imply, perhaps those who need the least air have the fewest extant brain cells left to call out for more oxygen! (Or less buid up of CO2, more accurately.)

PS some guys who goaded their friend into jumping off a bridge here were brought up on manslaughter charges when the guy died. Something to consider.

Aqua Jock
October 6th, 2008, 02:36 PM
Freedivers describe

"How far can you swim underwater on one breath?" as

"Dynamic Apnea without Fins"

Dynamic Apnea = Maximum distance covered horizontally under water

Current Freediving World Records
http://www.impulseadventure.com/freedive/world-record.html

I've done 50 yards and meters often but not lately.
There's some videos on youtube of people swimming very far underwater.

This stuff is dangerous don't go for any records.

mjgold
October 6th, 2008, 02:40 PM
I'm not sure why the turn is a killer. We do this probably 3-6 times a week at practice, with 1-2 of them with zoomers. I think the worst part is feeling like you can go farther, but not wanting to pass out in the water. I do 25 easy, and I've done 50s, but I've never tried anything farther than that. I don't think there's any point to it, and it's not worth getting hurt or dying.

Midas
October 6th, 2008, 02:43 PM
Freedivers describe

"How far can you swim underwater with one breath?" as

"Dynamic Apnea without Fins"

Dynamic Apnea = Maximum distance covered horizontally under water

Current Freediving World Records
http://www.impulseadventure.com/freedive/world-record.html

Wow. The world records for holding ones breath are over nine minutes for men and exactly eight minutes for women. That's hard core!

Midas
October 6th, 2008, 02:44 PM
I'm not sure why the turn is a killer. We do this probably 3-6 times a week at practice, with 1-2 of them with zoomers. I think the worst part is feeling like you can go farther, but not wanting to pass out in the water. I do 25 easy, and I've done 50s, but I've never tried anything farther than that. I don't think there's any point to it, and it's not worth getting hurt or dying.

The turns get you out of your groove and expend more oxygen... Then again, they break up the swim and give you a better sense of progress...

abc
October 6th, 2008, 02:49 PM
I don't think I could ever go 100m underwater. As for goading people, let me go ahead and say that it is highly dangerous, as stated in my very first post. Just fascinated to know that someone has actually done this.

Rykno
October 6th, 2008, 03:18 PM
in the summer of 93 it was a big thing for us swimming life guards to try to swim underwater. almost everyone I swam with could do 50m. so when word started to spread that someone made it 75m I tried it. took me 3-4 attempts to get the exhaling right. and in the last attempt I wound up drinking water the last 10m or so, since my body wanted to breath, by drinking I was able to trick my body into not breathe.

I did breaststroke with dolpin kicks inbetween my pulldowns.

I can easily do 25m now, have to work for 50m, but wouldn't imagine being able to do 75m.

aqualung
October 6th, 2008, 04:20 PM
dont do it anymore. VERY dangerous
Yep. There's a reason why it is no longer an Olympic event.


the underwater turn was a killer

I'm not sure why being underwater makes the turn any different unless it's super shallow. You're just doing the short-axis somersault turn right? I suppose that a long-axis turn works just as well. Of course, you won't be able to get a breath out of short-axis turn if you're underwater. Otherwise, it shouldn't make any difference. My problem is that I can't control my depth very well. If the pool is too shallow, I tend to scrape my chest off the pool bottom a lot, or do the sideways dolphin kick thing.

Underwater drills are still a good thing because it's the fifth stroke and happens in every event. But 15m max in competition!

More interesting is How fast can you go underwater? I haven't seen many people do it, but saw Shelley Ripple do 25 yards in about 14 seconds. That's on pace for a sub-minute 100. She wasn't using her arms at all, except to establish posture.

Mary1912
October 6th, 2008, 04:31 PM
I mentioned the turn was a killer because I usually am blowing out air in that process and I had to keep it very minimal and I was feeling it coming off the turn.

This was a lonnnng time ago too....

Typhoons Coach
October 6th, 2008, 04:35 PM
Whatever you decide, just do not hyperventilate prior to starting this madness... it's dangerous enough as it is.

A certain level of CO2 is necessary in the lungs to ensure your natural instinct to breath is maintained, if you hyper before you start, you could well pass out, sink to the bottom, and then unconsciously start "breathing" water when the CO2 levels reach their trigger point in your lungs. That would make rescue even more difficult on the poor lifeguard.

I absolutely agree that you should be extremely careful with this, and cannot agree more with the reason above! Two swim clubs down the road from us there were 4 girls (synchro swimmers that are trained to hold for long periods of time) that passed out within 2 minutes of eachother. Definitely be careful if it is a must for you to do this!

knelson
October 6th, 2008, 04:39 PM
I'm not sure why being underwater makes the turn any different

Turns underwater are way more difficult. For one thing your body wants to bob up to the surface, for another water is 1000 times denser than air, so reversing your direction takes a lot of energy.

Typhoons Coach
October 6th, 2008, 04:42 PM
Turns underwater are way more difficult. For one thing your body wants to bob up to the surface, for another water is 1000 times denser than air, so reversing your direction takes a lot of energy.

Another reason for this is that when you are swimming on the top of the water and complete a flip turn (if done properly) you will end up shooting under the existing current. While you are swimming underwater and making the turn underwater you are driving right into the force of your current.

2fish&1whale
October 6th, 2008, 04:47 PM
My dad, who could not swim above water to save his life, used to dive the entire length of our 50 meter pool using the breast stroke. I would not be surprised that , had he known how to do a turn, he would have gone back the other way for another 25 or so.

mjgold
October 6th, 2008, 04:48 PM
When I turn underwater, I do the breaststroke turn, just underwater (I'm usually swimming underwater breaststroke anyway, since my dolphin kicks don't get me very far for the effort spent). I let myself go towards the surface a bit before the turn so when I push off, I can push off under some of my turbulance.

Lump
October 6th, 2008, 04:57 PM
Had a teammate in college go over 100 meters (LCM) underwater. Wouldn't recommend trying it.

Personally haven't tried but I've been doing breath control stuff in practice. 25 SCY is easy unless you get your HR up. I'll do some 50's where I go 3 breathes, 2, 1, 0...go through that 3-4 times on 20-30 sec. rest.

SuperFlyGal
October 6th, 2008, 05:11 PM
Enough with the excuses. Someone make a run at 100m. Sure, you could die, but you will be forever immortalized on this message board. What more do you need?

Amen! :drown:

Big AL
October 6th, 2008, 05:51 PM
Yes.... I have been 100 meters and 100 yards. Yards is difficult cuz of the turns, but meters was really tough. Best way to do it was look at the bottom and stay relaxed, don't think about how far you have to go. I did big breaststroke pullouts with a slow dolphin glide... then repeat.

Was way more purple after the 100 meters.

Can still go 75 yards under water. Will not try to ever go further, due to the "blue" factor..... scary.

Kurt Dickson
October 6th, 2008, 06:31 PM
My brother ate a whopper in one bite....talk about blue...still mustered up enough brain cells to become an orthopedic surgeon...?maybe he could have been a neurosurgeon without that whopper...I guess we shall never know.:dunno:

Michael Heather
October 6th, 2008, 07:43 PM
I swam 100 yards underwater in a 20 yard pool long ago. The last yard I started to convulse and smacked my head on the wall just before passing out. I do not recommend the practice.

Typhoons Coach
October 6th, 2008, 10:05 PM
I swam 100 yards underwater in a 20 yard pool long ago. The last yard I started to convulse and smacked my head on the wall just before passing out. I do not recommend the practice.

Absolutely appreciate this anecdotal comment! Definitely shows that there is a danger there!

fanstone
October 6th, 2008, 10:33 PM
Having all other factors equal (endurance, V02 Max, size of lung, training and other physical stuff), what makes someone hold their breath longer is purely a mental game. The drive to breathe is based on an accumulation of C02 in the blood, the result of buffering of the acidic blood by H+ C03- which produces excess carbon dioxide. All the energy processes end up producing this C02 which must be eliminated from the body, and one of the methods of eliminating is via the lungs, where C02 is blown off as we breathe. So, we have a "normal" range of partial pressure of C02 dissolved in blood of 40, and as that number grows the urge to breathe becomes stronger. If we train our minds to hold that urge and not breathe we may stay under longer. Also if we swim faster we accumulate more C02 in our blood stream...so there is a balance between going faster and/or longer. The trick about hyperventilating is not that you get more oxygen in but that you get rid of more C02 circulating and thus you go under or hold your breathe for longer. The downside (caveat?) is that you might end up without oxygen and passing out in shallow water. This is getting long and boring, and was discussed in the past, but remember: it is not hunger for oxygen, but the need to expel carbon dioxide that makes you breathe.

jnbaker
October 7th, 2008, 10:14 AM
Wow. The world records for holding ones breath are over nine minutes for men and exactly eight minutes for women. That's hard core!

Why would men have an advantage in this?

alphadog
October 7th, 2008, 10:26 AM
Back in the glory days, we had this competition at the end of practice. I went between 90 and 95 yards before surfacing. I remember that I was convulsing when I came up and it really scared me. The twitching went away as soon as I took a breath, but it scared the crap out of me.

I can easily do 50 meters today (did it this summer with my 10 year old on my back), but I don't see any reason to try for more. I guess seeing your life flash before your eyes at the age of 18 makes you a little cautious.

Beyond a certain point, I think this "contest" has little swimming value beyond bragging rights. I wouldn't encourage it, but I guess there is the Darwin effect out there.

Discretion is the better part of valor!

mjgold
October 7th, 2008, 10:33 AM
Men typically have a larger lung capacity and a slower resting heart rate than women. The lower resting heart rate doesn't matter so much when you're holding your breath in the pool, but the cause of it probably affects it a bit. Men--in general--have larger hearts than women, and so they have to beat less to pump the same amount of blood. The faster your heart pumps, the faster your oxygen is depleted. I'm not a doctor, but I'd say that probably helps explain it.

Of course, any one woman could have an advantage over any one man. It isn't an across the board thing, since I may have a smaller lung capacity than some women and vice versa.

haroldbuck
October 7th, 2008, 11:05 AM
Why would men have an advantage in this?

It's not clear that they do. It may just be that there are more men dumb enough to try this sort of thing, so we've gotten further out into the tail of the distribution.

ehoch
October 7th, 2008, 12:38 PM
We (3 guys from swim team) did a challenge against some synchronized swimmers (2 very good ones) and they destroyed us. We made it to the 75 (short-course meters) + 1 person made a turn and had to come up - they went on without much struggle to the 100.

hofffam
October 7th, 2008, 02:33 PM
My first summer out of high school - 1976 - I swam 100 meters underwater. Two lengths of the 50M pool at Lackland AFB in San Antonio. I used to practice underwater swimming for fun by warming up with a 25, then resting a bit, and repeating with a longer distance each time. I would find that my efficiency underwater and my capacity seemed to increase with each repetition.

No way I would consider trying it again. I do 25s with fins fairly regularly and think with some practice I might reach 50 yards. But that would be the absolute limit.

aqualung
October 7th, 2008, 02:40 PM
Turns underwater are way more difficult.

I don't believe that it is more difficult. My long axis turns are already and always underwater. Maybe my feet come out a bit? On final approach in free, I torpedo under and into the wall. Same thing with back. That's current Stanford coaching--don't look at the cross-hairs, look at where the wall meets the floor. If you look up at all, you kill your own momentum. I find that I get an extra yard or two of momentum off the wall and that I use a whole lot less energy on the turn. My turns were quite horrible before this...

For one thing your body wants to bob up to the surface, for another water is 1000 times denser than air, so reversing your direction takes a lot of energy.
No. If you keep your head streamlined within your arms and place your kick-off feet between rump and knees in the horizontal plane, you jet out horizontally. If your head is tilted up or down (or if you arch your back), then you'll bob up or crash downwards. If you drop one foot, you'll roll.

mjgold
October 7th, 2008, 02:44 PM
That's a good idea. I'm assuming you still do a flip turn, just deeper underwater.

aqualung
October 7th, 2008, 02:55 PM
I'm assuming you still do a flip turn, just deeper underwater.

I don't know. I've never tried swimming underwater and then turning. I'm still working on my underwater dolphin kick. If I do that dolphin kick, I can't do that breastroke arm movement, which I believe would slow me down underwater. And if I do the breastroke arm movement underwater, wouldn't I want to do a short-axis turn (backwards somersault)? The short-axis turn isn't normally underwater like the long-axis turn.

knelson
October 7th, 2008, 02:55 PM
No. If you keep your head streamlined within your arms and place your kick-off feet between rump and knees in the horizontal plane, you jet out horizontally.

Right, but you have to get your feet over your head before this. This is the part that is slow underwater. It's much faster on the surface because when you sommersault your legs are out of the water. If you try that underwater it really puts on the brakes.

Whenever I do underwater no-breathers for distance I do more of a spin turn. This seems faster to me.

knelson
October 7th, 2008, 02:58 PM
I don't know. I've never tried swimming underwater and then turning.

Whoa! Hold on a sec, isn't that what we're talking about here?

mjgold
October 7th, 2008, 03:18 PM
I meant when he refered to Standford coaching--the torpedoing underwater for the turn.

knelson
October 7th, 2008, 03:21 PM
I meant when he refered to Standford coaching--the torpedoing underwater for the turn.

Yeah, I know what you were talking about. I thought this entire thread was about underwater no breathers, but now that I reread aqualung's posts it seems he's talking about regular flipturns.

Midas
October 7th, 2008, 03:30 PM
That's a good idea. I'm assuming you still do a flip turn, just deeper underwater.

Flip turns would be bad if you're trying to hold your breath because unless you are excellent at equalizing the pressure in your nose, most people need to blow out through their noses while flipping to prevent water getting up there. It's best to just touch and turn. No way is it as fast at doing an open turn at the surface of the water.

mjgold
October 7th, 2008, 03:41 PM
Well, I'm a breaststroker, so open turns is all I do. I only do front crawl in practice as a warm up and to make sure I don't do so much breaststroke that I wear myself out.

Midas
October 7th, 2008, 04:00 PM
Well, I'm a breaststroker, so open turns is all I do. I only do front crawl in practice as a warm up and to make sure I don't do so much breaststroke that I wear myself out.

That's right. You're the "natural". Looking forward to hearing how you do at your upcoming (first ever) meet!

mjgold
October 7th, 2008, 04:02 PM
I think Robert Redford might have something to say about that, haha. I'm just hoping I don't get DQed or fall off the blocks at the start.

Midas
October 7th, 2008, 04:43 PM
Redford was only an actor...

Regardless of how you do, don't get either discouraged or overly encouraged. You have great enthusiasm for swimming and that's something you should try to cultivate into a lifetime of enjoyment.

Anyway, sorry for hijacking the thread!

Back to our regularly scheduled programing: Don't try to find out how far you can go underwater. It's bad stuff!

pwolf66
October 8th, 2008, 10:14 AM
I don't believe that it is more difficult. My long axis turns are already and always underwater.


If you beleive that then I have a drill for you.

Tumble Turn - submerge completely as you reach the flags, swim to the wall underwater and perform a flip turn, push off and streamline to the flags and breakout. At no time during the tumble turn can any of your body break the surface of the water be it hands, head, feet, etc.

Give those a try and you will see that while you may _think_ you are turning while underwater, your feet are still going at or above the surface of the water during the turn.

aqualung
October 8th, 2008, 02:33 PM
Yeah, I know what you were talking about. I thought this entire thread was about underwater no breathers, but now that I reread aqualung's posts it seems he's talking about regular flipturns.

Yeah. I'm still trying to understand what the issue is. I don't know if it's still within subject.
Would a flipturn with your feet coming out be a conflict with the goal of being underwater? Is the whole idea being unable to inhale air because your head is underwater or being completely submerged?

I wasn't sure why a regular flip turn couldn't happen underwater. What's the difference if your feet can't come out of the water?


submerge completely as you reach the flags
I usually don't torpedo until the final <0.10 seconds before the wall, but I suppose I'll try torpedoing as early as the flags and going underwater for the wall. We'll see what happens... My turns normally plant my feet right on the horizontals of the cross-hairs. What if you adjust depth on the underwater travel so that the turn puts the feet on those same horizontals, thus having the feet come out of the water?
I count all of my long-axis regular turns as being underwater. I've swam underwater across the length of a pool but usually stop and surface at the wall. Only in distant memory have I tried going more than one pool length underwater, and at the time, it wasn't a regular long-axis somersault turn at the end nor very fast--more of an old-fashioned butterfly hands on the wall turn.

Have you guys ever done turn drills where you break the motions apart? Drill 1-just torpedoing. Drill 2-turning but coming to a halt as you plant your feet on the wall (to check alignment, form, etc), etc?



Well, I'm a breaststroker, so open turns is all I do.

What about short-axis back somersault turns for a breastroke? Is that what you mean?

mjgold
October 8th, 2008, 04:59 PM
It was a joke, really. I just meant that flipturns are for crazy people that like to thrash about in the water on their fronts or backs.

knelson
October 8th, 2008, 05:09 PM
I wasn't sure why a regular flip turn couldn't happen underwater. What's the difference if your feet can't come out of the water?

Try it and you'll see! Trying to do a flip turn while completely submerged is very slow. If you do the tumble turns like Paul suggested you'll see what we mean.

I think most people would say swimming underwater means exactly that. If you come to the surface for the turns--even if you don't breathe--it's cheating.

jonah
November 18th, 2010, 02:37 AM
New record set 2010-09-27. Dynamic Without Fins. 218m. Dave Mullins.

All the record attempts I've seen use breaststroke with breaststroke kick and a long glide between strokes. Presumably that's the best method known for super long attempts.

aris ioannidis
November 18th, 2010, 07:38 AM
You need to be very relaxed before starting. It helps to have a neckweight to neutralize the positive buoyancy from your lungs. Normally varies between 2-5kg depending on your size, suit and amount of extra air in your lungs. The neckweight also gives you momentum when you push from the walls and glide until you decelerate significantly.

dross
November 18th, 2010, 05:51 PM
I once went 15 meters underwater, but I had to sit out the rest of the week. And I kept dreaming I was Shelly Winters in the Poseiden Adventure. And I'm a guy...

orca1946
November 18th, 2010, 06:52 PM
Lately, 35 yds is it @ almost 65. I really like to use air !

TrentRichardson
November 18th, 2010, 07:02 PM
YouTube - Dave Mullins 218 DNF World Record 27 Sept 2010.MOD

stillwater
November 18th, 2010, 07:23 PM
At the start he only needed two strokes per lap with no dolphin kick.

I wonder why he wore a wetsuit. It seems to me that the floatation would hinder.

Quite impressive.

I did 75 yards underwater a couple of decades ago. It wasn't easy.

Karl_S
November 18th, 2010, 08:05 PM
About 30 years ago, when I was in HS, we had a competition in PE class to see who could go the farthest swimming underwater. (This was a time when people were allowed to do stupid stuff.) A few of my classmates were making it one length of our 25 yard pool. I am thinking, "ok, I can do that. I do 25 with no breath frequently." Then, after most of the students had taken their shot, one kid who was NOT on the swim team, went two full lengths, turning under the water. Being a teen-age boy on the swim team, I knew this could not stand, but I had never even tried to go more than 25 yards before. I knew the trick would be to not use up my oxygen too fast. I mostly just used flutter kick with my arms at my sides, with a few ez breaststroke pullouts. I did open turns but under the water, as we were supposed to be fully submerged. I made it 55 yds, i.e. just to the flags after my second turn. I also scared the %$#* out of myself and have never been able to do more than 25 underwater since. In fact, I think it is interfering with my attempts to learn SDK better. My advise: Don't try this nutty stuff.

Allen Stark
November 18th, 2010, 08:20 PM
This is very much a"don't try this at home,these are trained professionals."As noted before,hyperventilating and then swimming as far as you can underwater is a very good way to drown.

new
November 18th, 2010, 08:40 PM
the longest I ever did it was 65 meters, short course

pendaluft
November 18th, 2010, 09:03 PM
At the start he only needed two strokes per lap with no dolphin kick.

I wonder why he wore a wetsuit. It seems to me that the floatation would hinder.


Pretty sure he's wearing a weight belt. No fins doesn't mean no weights!

gdanner
November 18th, 2010, 10:38 PM
Underwater training is very useful, but I've never tried max distance just for the sake of doing it at a slow speed. When I coached DIII for a couple years, I had a very tough time getting some swimmers to buy into underwater sets...but it's usually just 25's, not max stuff. People are concerned about pushing it to their limit sometimes. I would get irritated when college kids wouldn't kick a 25 under water. I mean a 25, come on! Coaching can be very rewarding, but I prefer to be competing.

chaos
November 18th, 2010, 10:50 PM
in eleuthera, there is a coral formation called the tunnel... yes, you guessed it. its a tunnel that is +/- 60 feet long and is about 30' below the surface. diameter is about 5' and lionfish hang out near the roof of the tunnel.

after dropping to the entrance and timing myself a few times to be sure that i would have enough air to swim through, i went for it. yes i was wearing fins.

so, to answer the question: How far can you go underwater without a breath?

i'm pretty sure i can go all the way to the emergency room with a little practice!

nhc
November 19th, 2010, 02:07 AM
According to some study, holding breath for too long can not only cause sudden death, but also damage to the brain (http://tierneylab.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/04/28/is-breath-holding-hazardous-to-your-brain/).

Karl_S
November 19th, 2010, 08:47 AM
... When I coached DIII for a couple years, I had a very tough time getting some swimmers to buy into underwater sets...but it's usually just 25's, not max stuff. People are concerned about pushing it to their limit sometimes. I would get irritated when college kids wouldn't kick a 25 under water. I mean a 25, come on! Coaching can be very rewarding, but I prefer to be competing.
I guess that I would have endured considerable ridicule from you had you been my coach because I have been working my SDK studiously for months and I have yet to complete a 25. About 15 or 16 yds is my best effort so far. Slow flutter kick I am quite sure I can do a 25 no problem, but SDK is a different matter entirely. It seems to guzzle O2.

nhc
November 19th, 2010, 10:23 AM
According to some study, holding breath for too long can not only cause sudden death, but also damage to the brain (http://tierneylab.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/04/28/is-breath-holding-hazardous-to-your-brain/).

If death occurred, the brain would have been damaged :D

ande
November 19th, 2010, 11:59 AM
quite impressive

He did a great job with efficiency, streamlining, & conservation of energy through proper pacing

How much time did it take him to cover that distance?


YouTube - Dave Mullins 218 DNF World Record 27 Sept 2010.MOD (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmAEjxkdxec&feature=related)

Gail Roper
November 20th, 2010, 11:07 AM
In the late 50's the Japanese used to swim the 100m LC breaststroke with only one breath on the turn. This is at top speed and they set the WR that way. That's why the rules were changed as swimmers were passing out trying it.
Many swimmers have died trying underwater practice, do not do it! Do not deprive your brain of oxygen!
There was a study once on hypoxic training. A college team had two groups of swimmers, one trained for three months with regular breathing and the other group incorporated hypoxic sets. They were tested before and after the test for VO2 max, etc. At the end, there was no difference between the sets other than the hypoxic group got better at doing it. Both sets improved their times equally.

debaru
November 21st, 2010, 11:11 AM
so, to answer the question: How far can you go underwater without a breath?

i'm pretty sure i can go all the way to the emergency room with a little practice!

Thank you, Chaos! You've given me the perfect retort to my 30-something coach the next time he wants me to swim a "hypoxic" set. :bump:

On a side note, I've been doing quite a bit of reading on the value of hypoxic swimming. Since I am a 50+ swimmer who only recently came back to the sport after a very long absence, I believe there are limitations to what I can do at my age. Instead, I prefer to do what I call "controlled breathing" during the hypoxic sets my coach asks me to do. I've been able to do 3/5/7/9 stuff, but I never do it while trying to swim fast, or when I'm tired.

gdanner
November 21st, 2010, 01:13 PM
I guess that I would have endured considerable ridicule from you had you been my coach because I have been working my SDK studiously for months and I have yet to complete a 25. About 15 or 16 yds is my best effort so far. Slow flutter kick I am quite sure I can do a 25 no problem, but SDK is a different matter entirely. It seems to guzzle O2.

Well, ridicule isn't part of my vocabulary :) I always try to stay positive, even if I'm steaming internally. Good luck with the training though, I hope it gets easier for you.

pwolf66
November 22nd, 2010, 09:15 AM
quite impressive

He did a great job with efficiency, streamlining, & conservation of energy through proper pacing

How much time did it take him to cover that distance?

About 4 minutes and 10 seconds.

swimmerb212
November 22nd, 2010, 11:43 AM
Does anyone else feel like they have to pee when swimming underwater? And does it give anyone else a headache that lasts all day? I always attribute it to all of my organs shutting down, so when we have underwaters in practice, I use that time to work on swimming efficently and calmly, but never to the point of pain.

As much as it is exciting thrill to go the whole way underwater in a pool, now that I've done it, I'm going to forgo the headache and peeing if it's not going to make me a better swimmer.

Dolphin 2
November 22nd, 2010, 11:59 AM
This is not a record in swimming, but as a metaphorical example of the phrase “Who can hold their breath under water the longest?”, I believe the labor standoff between walnut workers of the Teamsters Union and Blue Diamond Inc. was the longest in U.S. history:

http://goliath.ecnext.com/coms2/gi_0198-205989/Contract-vote-by-Diamond-Walnut.html

Yeah it’s a really tacky comment, but the board has been pretty slow lately and I thought it would lighten things up a bit. :bolt:

D2

chaos
November 22nd, 2010, 04:26 PM
anyone who is really interested in developing this skill should seek out a free diving coach.