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View Full Version : How much crawl work for stroke specialists?



jnbaker
October 7th, 2008, 10:26 AM
I decided to race only breastroke events for a Master's meet later this year.

When I swam in college (85 - 89) I was primarily a breastroker, but also swam the 50 free. In college and high school, I would guess that the stroke specialists still spent maybe 1/2 of each workout swimming freestyle. I just started wondering why that is?

Do you think that someone like Branden Hansen spends any workout time doing freestyle, or would he only do breastroke?

At first I thought that maybe my coaches were worried about repitition-type injuries, and had us swim freestyle to mix things up for the muscles, joints, etc - however I don't remember the pure freestylists ever swimming anything other than freestyle. So why did the butter/back/breast guys still do so much freestyle work?

Typhoons Coach
October 7th, 2008, 12:19 PM
I would absolutely have my specialist swimmers (odd stroke swimmers) work on other strokes. It makes them a more complete swimmer and the different strokes work various muscle groups. Just my opinion on that one.

JimRude
October 7th, 2008, 01:05 PM
At first I thought that maybe my coaches were worried about repitition-type injuries, and had us swim freestyle to mix things up for the muscles, joints, etc - however I don't remember the pure freestylists ever swimming anything other than freestyle. So why did the butter/back/breast guys still do so much freestyle work?

Because those were the days of big-time aerobic base training, and the only way you could get 10-15,000+ yards done in a day is with lots of freestyle.

Nowadays, with much less yardage being done (a generalization, I know), there is the opportunity to train more event-specific. Although IMHO fly and breast are the toughest strokes to swim well in practice when tired, so there is a limiting factor there...

Typhoons Coach
October 7th, 2008, 02:25 PM
Nowadays, with much less yardage being done (a generalization, I know), there is the opportunity to train more event-specific. Although IMHO fly and breast are the toughest strokes to swim well in practice when tired, so there is a limiting factor there...

I absolutely agree with your opinion here with regard to tired swimming with proper technique, etc...

okra
October 9th, 2008, 10:31 AM
I'm freestylist and rarely do breaststroke.