PDA

View Full Version : The primary goal you want to achieve in/through swimming?



ddl
October 9th, 2008, 02:07 AM
Please be as selective as possible in answering the poll--the question is about the primary (main) goal, so please try to avoid selecting too many answers. Thanks :)

Rykno
October 9th, 2008, 02:55 AM
I started out swimming again to get back into shape, so I voted maintain a strong body. But after 6-9 months I decided I wasn't happy just swimming for the sake of swimming. so I also voted swim faster.

I find it easier to put my body through 3 workouts a week, and fight with my wife for more pool time if I have races to train for, and results to show her that it's worth all the effort.

Lump
October 9th, 2008, 09:37 AM
I can't really nail it to one thing. I'd say first is health...to be of better mind and body. Second, have fun. Third, swim fast and improve.

JPSWMCCH
October 9th, 2008, 10:19 AM
I wrote "other" but wasn't specific. Though I have promoted physical health through swimming my whole professional life as a professor of health and wellness, and a swim coach, to me the greatest benefit is mental/emotional health: I feel so much more alive, calm, strong mentally to face the day, upbeat when I swim. I consider mental/emotional health the bottom line, though I am happy that I am strong physically at my age (in a new age group now, am really a senior), and I love to swim faster- and I love to race- than I did previously. In these difficult days of stress about diminishing retirement funds, higher prices, etc., Masters swimming is a wonderful gift that I cherish that I am able to continue doing the rest of my life! JP

Typhoons Coach
October 9th, 2008, 10:56 AM
Definitely all for the exercise! It is one of the best things, in my opinion, that you can do to maintain a healthy body!

ddl
October 9th, 2008, 01:22 PM
So many people swim for speed, could someone tell me why they care so much about speed? To me, the practical aspects of swimming seem more important, such as endurance, long-distance swimming, etc., for example when you have to do that under certain circumstances in life (extreme example like the Titantic disaster). As for speed, unless a shark or whale is chasing you in the ocean, what's the practical importance of it, if not for competition? (If I get convinced I'll pay more attention to improve speed ;))

The Fortress
October 9th, 2008, 01:30 PM
So many people swim for speed, could someone tell me why they care so much about speed? To me, the practical aspects of swimming seems more important, such as endurance, long-distance swimming, etc., for example when you have to do that under certain circumstances in life (extreme example like the Titantic disaster). As for speed, unless a shark or whale is chasing you in the ocean, what's the practical importance of it, if not for competition? (If I get convinced I'll pay more attention to improve speed ;))

Speed is awesome and a nice high! You certainly can't compete effectively without it, and most of what I do in the pool is geared to competition.

In general, though, it's good to exercise all the body's energy systems. To me, lap swimming or long distance swimming is incredibly dull. I do endurance work in the pool, but if I want some real zone 2 work, I walk out the door and run. Not too concerned about being practical either; I just want my endorphins.

(When are we getting an endorphin smiley?)

CreamPuff
October 9th, 2008, 01:41 PM
Keeps me focused in life and out of trouble (for the most part.) :laugh2:

mjgold
October 9th, 2008, 01:43 PM
I got the need for speed. I picked all of them but other, because I'm in the pool for fun, but it's for competition. I think you need all of them to compete at your best, so I picked all of them.

The Fortress
October 9th, 2008, 01:43 PM
Keeps me focused in life and out of trouble (for the most part.) :laugh2:

I liked (S)he-Man better, Cream Puff!

There's really no cream puff about you ...

CreamPuff
October 9th, 2008, 01:45 PM
I liked (S)he-Man better, Cream Puff!

There's really no cream puff about you ...

Ah well. . . it's what I feel like during Landon's practices!;)

aqualung
October 9th, 2008, 01:54 PM
other: cross-training for mountaineering, biathlons, etc

tjrpatt
October 9th, 2008, 02:56 PM
Intially, I swam to lose weight because my Knee surgeon said that all this weight wasn't good for my knee. Now, it is to swim faster and the to show that people who look like NFL Tight Ends can be good swimmers too!! Plus, I would like to do the times that I did in high school eventually. I have reason after reason for swimming.

aquatune
October 9th, 2008, 05:02 PM
I chose "swim better" because I have such a deep deep love for swimming; I'm so much better in the rest of my life when I'm getting pool time. So I swim to swim. Other things I do to help my swimming. Of course I love the fitness, love it when I have a swim breakthrough, but in the end I swim to swim.

Thrashing Slug
October 9th, 2008, 05:15 PM
I chose "swim better" and "be faster", since those are my main areas of focus when swimming.

Equally enjoyable are the days when I swim just to relax, to meditate, to enjoy the sensation of flying through the water.

Of course, I swim to stay healthy too.

There should be a poll option that says "to stay sane". If I'm somewhere where I can't swim for a while I tend to get irritable and start going crazy. It's sort of an addiction. Otherwise why would I seek out strange pools when traveling and get up at 4:30 AM to do it?

Chris Stevenson
October 9th, 2008, 05:41 PM
So many people swim for speed, could someone tell me why they care so much about speed?

Well...it is a competitive sport, after all...

I chose the two top answers, "swim faster" and "stronger body." I swim for health but having specific time goals helps motivate me to train harder (and presumably be healthier).

Big AL
October 9th, 2008, 06:52 PM
I would have chosen "deter a weak body", but in place of that, "maintain a strong body" is the best other option.

I have had nothing but back/neck problems since I was 14 (probably from the daily severe beatings of psychopath parents), which finally took its toll over the years culminating in a partial paralysis from the waist down at 33 (from additional factors). Took nearly 2 years to walk again without a cane, meanwhile the inevitable weight gain.

Have only been able to do freestyle pull since then. Have begun doing 25s and 50s stroke on speed days, but no real IM training. If we do 10x100 IMs I might do 1 or 2, then pull freestyle... won't attempt anything longer. Actually did a lot of breastroke this summer for the first time ever, but very little kicking. Still can't get the bouy off.

chowmi
October 9th, 2008, 08:43 PM
The Cat Bus! I love the Cat bus! Big Totoro fan!!!

Aqua Jock
October 9th, 2008, 10:20 PM
How come look better naked wasn't a choice?

I want to swim faster, get stronger, look buff, eat whatever I want and never get fat.

AJ

ddl
October 9th, 2008, 11:01 PM
Well...it is a competitive sport, after all...

But running is also a competitive sport, yet many (most?) people who jog don't seem to care about speed. ?

jim thornton
October 9th, 2008, 11:40 PM
1. Mental Health

PS I think a good compromise between S(h)e-Man and CreamPuff might be a Napoleon. This tasty pastry has a very similar cream-filled center as a traditional CreamPuff, but it has that hint of miniaturized victorious masculinity that S(h)e-Man was redolent of.

I think a Napoleon would swim primarily in order to conquer nations across a body of water.

Chris Stevenson
October 10th, 2008, 08:13 AM
But running is also a competitive sport, yet many (most?) people who jog don't seem to care about speed. ?

And those people tend not to enter road races or, if they do, their goal is simply to finish. Obviously their goal is solely fitness and that is a laudable goal.

My goal is fitness too, but keeping track of times and scheduling upcoming races/meets is the way I can motivate myself to train well. There is no doubt that I would not work as hard (and consequently be less fit) without these things. I can't speak for others, only myself, but you asked why some consider speed an important goal.

Plus (again, for me) the payback is greater in achieving various time goals. I already KNOW I can finish the race or simply train, a sense of accomplishment (for me) comes in doing something I was not sure I can do ahead of time.

When I am 85 years old, no doubt I'll feel a sense of accomplishment in just DOING a 200 fly, regardless of time... :)

CreamPuff
October 10th, 2008, 08:49 AM
1. Mental Health


Keep swimming Jim! :thhbbb:



PS I think a good compromise between S(h)e-Man and CreamPuff might be a Napoleon. This tasty pastry has a very similar cream-filled center as a traditional CreamPuff, but it has that hint of miniaturized victorious masculinity that S(h)e-Man was redolent of.
I think a Napoleon would swim primarily in order to conquer nations across a body of water.

I object. I am not vertically challenged. Unless I am in a heat with women born post 1990.

FlyQueen
October 10th, 2008, 09:47 AM
I picked faster but I also need to work out - mind, body and spirit all require regular workouts. The bottom line is I am VERY competitive - my prinicipal pointed this out to me last year even. I love racing and competing. I also love my teammates and the friends I've made. They are a huge part of why I am still involved and show up to meets. Masters swimmers are the nicest group of people around.

Something else I want to achieve is getting the word out on how great USMS is and get more people involved. I'm thrilled our membership is on the rise!!!

smontanaro
October 11th, 2008, 12:09 PM
Better health.

Thrashing Slug
October 11th, 2008, 03:13 PM
The Cat Bus! I love the Cat bus! Big Totoro fan!!!

Me too :D I am a fan of all Miyazaki's movies.

You'd probably like this iGoogle theme: http://www.google.com/ig/directory?q=miyazaki&hl=en&type=themes&dpos=themes

jim thornton
October 11th, 2008, 07:10 PM
I think that you need to add another possible answer to your poll. Reading between the lines, I am virtually positive that our beloved CreamPuff would like to answer her main goals in swimming with this famous quote from Conan the Barbarian:

"To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of the women."

Kristina, when are you going to actually travel to a meet in the Colonies Zones area so that those of us who do not completely believe you exist can have a chance to behold the CreamPuff/-female-lamentation-inducer in person?

Blackbeard's Peg
October 15th, 2008, 04:09 PM
All of the above + Meet women! :angel:

aztimm
October 15th, 2008, 05:27 PM
I started swimming with a masters team with no prior swim team experience. I was familiar with the program after doing a few triathlons. When I first started, I swam with a team that was pretty competitive. I did my first meet about 2-3 months after I started. I continued to do 2-3 meets a year for the next few years, while moving and changing teams in there.

However, after swimming in the USMS SC nationals my team hosted a few years ago, it was just such a big mess that it turned me off from meets. I ended up scratching my last event at that meet, and haven't done a meet since.

For swimming, I get a sense of accomplishment seeing my practice times improve, racing others on my team. We typically have a, "Fast Friday," set and we'll go off the blocks, race, rest, etc. The encouragement I get from my teammates is unbelievable. If I miss a few workouts, I'll usually get some comments asking why (I travel quite a bit). If I'm having an off day, teammates and/or the coach will ask if something is going on. Conversely, they'll also notice if I'm faster than normal.

Much of my focus over the past 6 months has been on running. Contrary to swimming, I ran when I was younger, and got to be quite fast while in the Army (came close to 5min miles). I started back with 2 miles about 2 years ago, and am now up to nearly 17 miles. I'm hoping to not only 'do' a marathon, but complete it within 4 hours (a far cry from my younger years, but have to start somewhere). Eventually, I'd like to get Boston-qualifying times. With an iPod and Nike+, I'm able to keep track of my progress, challenging both myself and others who use that system. Once in a while I'll run with someone, or try to keep up with someone as they pass me during a training run. It is a whole different experience though, much more individual.

There's days when I question why I continue to swim, then I realize all the team experience, and that I do benefit from the cross training. I don't think I'll ever compete in a formal meet again; I feel that since I didn't swim when I was younger, I'll never be as competitive in swimming as someone who did. I stand more of a chance of gaining back some of my running, so that is more of a focus now. I also lift weights, and the three work quite well in balancing things out, and keeping me in half decent shape.

david.margrave
October 15th, 2008, 11:05 PM
It started out as a way to lose weight. Having mostly met my weight loss goal, now my goal is to beat times from age 15-16, at least in distance events (probably no chance in sprints). I guess that would count as 'other' or 'faster'.

The Fortress
October 15th, 2008, 11:21 PM
Meet women! :angel:

Nice! :applaud:

If more people realized this, maybe we could increase USMS membership.

chaos
October 15th, 2008, 11:25 PM
sleep.

no swim=no sleep

FlyQueen
October 16th, 2008, 12:16 AM
Nice! :applaud:

If more people realized this, maybe we could increase USMS membership.

Or if the single AND good looking men joined ... :kiss1:

Redbird Alum
October 16th, 2008, 08:55 AM
I voted "other" so:
A. Mental health (stress reducer)
B. Control blood pressure, cholesterol.

LindsayNB
October 16th, 2008, 01:11 PM
...
However, after swimming in the USMS SC nationals my team hosted a few years ago, it was just such a big mess that it turned me off from meets. I ended up scratching my last event at that meet, and haven't done a meet since.
...
I don't think I'll ever compete in a formal meet again; I feel that since I didn't swim when I was younger, I'll never be as competitive in swimming as someone who did.
...

You have roused my curiosity, what sort of mess occurred that so turned you off?

I think this latter point hints at one of the unspoken but implicitly accepted fallacies underlying the design of masters swimming programming, i.e. that five year age groups are a reasonable system for organizing competition. Of course it may well be that like democracy it is the worst system except for all the others.

Allen Stark
October 16th, 2008, 09:22 PM
I voted for swim faster.Swimming fast is just more fun for me than swimming slow.It feels better.What I really would have voted for though is"so I can live forever."I haven't died yet so "so far so good."

swim25
October 19th, 2008, 09:14 PM
I started swimming because it was something to do with one of my friends, he was swimming at the time, I then started swimming in a class at my college. It was run like a regular practice. We had workouts on the whiteboard and raced certain days. I became hooked. I really enjoyed the shared pain that my lane mates and I would endure. We would push each to see what we were made of and I became addicted. After that class was over I swam by myself and it wasn't the same so I joined a masters group and it is good to be back. Mental health is definitely a huge reason why I swim. At this time in my life I moved to a new town for school, where I know no one and I left my wonderful girlfriend behind(were still together), so times are hard but swimming makes everything good again. It makes me feel strong, like I can achieve what I set out to do. A little long but finally to answer the question I swim to constantly push myself mentally and physically.

Red60
October 20th, 2008, 04:57 PM
I thought I had to choose only one, so I selected "swim faster." In point of fact, this is a trick I play on myself to keep me engaged. I swam in high school, intended to do so in college, then packed it in and did other things as an undergraduate. Many years later, I went back to the water to swim for fitness. After a heart attack, I realized that my daydream of "someday" swimming masters was really a requirement in order to reclaim my sense of myself as an athlete. I don't work out with a team except for very rarely, but I love working out and preparing for meets. My cardiologist gave me a hard time about it until I said, "Look. If I don't compete, I'll swim less and less. Then I won't swim. Then my stress level will go up. My alcohol consumption will increase. I will be an unhealthy mess. So I'm going to compete; the only question is whether you will remain my doctor." He backed off.

So now, I swim 3 or 4 meets a year. I'm still working on my technique, which is improving, and getting the tempo up to sprinting levels. I swim new events (200 IM) to keep from getting discouraged about plateaus elsewhere. But the whole thing is premised on a sense of myself as a competitor, and speed is basic to that. Everything descends from said goal. Which, as I say, is a trick to keep my heart beating and me smiling.

Life is funny, no?

geochuck
October 20th, 2008, 05:21 PM
My primary goal to be a swimmer was to please my Mother and Father. My four older brothers were swimmers so I had to be a swimmer.

My brothers went to the pool to train I had to go. I was the reluctant swimmer but found out I was a pretty natural swimmer.

My dad went to swim meets to take my brothers to the swim meets, I was a passenger so also ended up at the swim meets.

ViveBene
October 20th, 2008, 05:26 PM
So as not to congeal.

:groovy: (This works, too)

Where is (S)he-Man?

Glider
October 20th, 2008, 05:47 PM
(S)he had an identity crisis and is now CreamPuff:bump:


So as not to congeal.

:groovy: (This works, too)

Where is (S)he-Man?