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ralphy5555
October 9th, 2008, 06:20 AM
:argue:

I'm new and my first post caused some fighting! Good times! :)

Reading all the responses was perfect for me though. Thanks everybody.


But now I'm wondering why the fast guys swimming the 1500 seem to breath only on one side?

For me I want to do triathlons so I will be swimming longer distances. I've read and been told that bilateral breathing is the way to go. But if I watch Hackett he isn't doing that. At least I don't think so.

Rykno
October 9th, 2008, 07:57 AM
I noticed that too. Not just hackett, but most of the heats I saw, they were only breathing to one side.

I only breathe the the right, and when i swim anything longer than a 100m, I take a breath every stroke. (even into the walls)

the only time I breathe to the left is in open water swimming, if I want to see how close the person next to me is.

Breathing to one side definitely effects your stroke, especially if you slow down your breathing arm in the air. I know that I have a deeper left arm because of my right side breathing.

Mary1912
October 9th, 2008, 08:56 AM
I'm a bilateral breather all the way. I find it more even, more natural. But that's just me. Everyone is different.

geochuck
October 9th, 2008, 09:04 AM
One side for me on the left every full cycle. My distance races were a little longer then any triathlete swims. However I could breathe equally well either side. I did do a little bilateral breathing during training just to make sure I was swimming balanced.

Lump
October 9th, 2008, 09:24 AM
I was a bilateral breather as top tier distance guy back in the day. Generally it was 2 consecutive breaths to the right and then maybe 1 or 2 on the left. For me I found that always breathing to the right side would really wear out and stress one arm/shoulder. Usually on the last 100 or so THEN I may have gone to one side only along with a quicker beat kick.

NOW, after coming back after 15 years, I've found that I have a much more difficult time breathing to the left. Like someone stated, I have a deeper catch on my left arm. I'm trying to work it out though to be more bilateral. With pools being set up for SCY I'm trying to find the right stroke count/breathing pattern to match up with the 25 yard length so I come into the turn breathing to the right (my dominant side). It takes some time to be sure.

Typhoons Coach
October 9th, 2008, 10:59 AM
For distance swimmers that I coach, I tell them to breath to the dominant side and get in a consistent breathing rythm that is as comfortable as possible. That could be the reasoning; that they are breathing to their dominant side...

tjrpatt
October 9th, 2008, 11:04 AM
I do a good share on long distance swimming. I usually breathe to one side and usually at the last 100 I breathe every 3rd stroke. I feel that I get more oxygen that way.

Leonard Jansen
October 9th, 2008, 11:26 AM
Bilateral breathing isn't necessary, but it is nice to be able to do for a number of reasons. I tend to breathe mostly to my right on shorter races (<=5 km) and a bit more free-form on races longer than that. I find that it helps to stay more relaxed. I suggest that you try breathing on one side when you go "up" the pool and breathe on the other when you go "down" the pool.

-LBJ

Ripple
October 9th, 2008, 11:32 AM
If you want to do triathlons - I'm assuming they're outdoors, in open water - it's a good idea to learn to breath on both sides. If it's very choppy, you might be getting slapped in the face by waves when you try to breath only on the good side, and it seems to be a little easier to keep a straight line when breathing bi-lateraly. Also comes in handy when sharing a lane with a really splashy lane-mate. (Which is also good training for open water.)

ehoch
October 9th, 2008, 12:16 PM
95% of all swimmers breath to one side -- they are able to breath to both sides,but they don't do it in a race. Why ? Because you get 1/3 less oxygen. Many of the swimmers that do use the bilateral breathing have a pretty high turnover - so they probably get a little more air than somebody only taking 16 cycles per 50. Most of the Olympic finalists (I only looked at the men's races for that) in the 400 and 1500 were even breathing on the first stroke after the turn - they don't "pop up" after the turn, but they get air as quickly as possible. And of course they hold their breath until lifting their head :bump:

mjgold
October 9th, 2008, 12:32 PM
95% of all swimmers breath to one side -- they are able to breath to both sides,but they don't do it in a race. Why ? Because you get 1/3 less oxygen. Many of the swimmers that do use the bilateral breathing have a pretty high turnover - so they probably get a little more air than somebody only taking 16 cycles per 50. Most of the Olympic finalists (I only looked at the men's races for that) in the 400 and 1500 were even breathing on the first stroke after the turn - they don't "pop up" after the turn, but they get air as quickly as possible. And of course they hold their breath until lifting their head :bump:

Grant Hackett doesn't. :snore:

Just as an aside, I really don't know what your problem is. I admitted that if you're breathing less than every stroke cycle, you probably aren't going to continuously exhale. I really can't see why you're so stubborn that you can't admit that a lot of the big guys (Hackett, Phelps, etc.) do when they breathe every stroke cycle. Is it that hard for you to just let it go?

stillwater
October 9th, 2008, 01:13 PM
Breathing on both sides during a distance race can be important.

Sometimes it is important to watch your opponent. Yes, I know swimming is an individual sport, but if you are trying to win a gold (or place), or score points for your team, you must keep your competition within striking distance.

aqualung
October 9th, 2008, 01:57 PM
I liked Typhoons Coach's answer.
I swim mostly distance. I prefer breathing bilaterally, but one side becomes more convenient because I'm always sharing a swim lane with others. When circling, I tend to breathe on the lane divider side because otherwise, I'll probably breathe in somebody's splash.

Now. What about butterfly? I prefer breathing as little as possible because it seems that breathing is less streamlined than not breathing.

anita
October 9th, 2008, 02:00 PM
I've always swum distance and only breathe on my right unless I'm watching a close competitor. It keeps my rhythm, which is important to have when you're swimming long distances (IMO). I probably breathe 50% every other, and 50% every 4 strokes, depending.

abc
October 9th, 2008, 02:25 PM
Fast people tend to breathe to one side because it's easier and faster. Bilateral breathing is pointless to me, but I don't do triathlons or open water swimming. Every now and then you'll see a good swimmer breathe to both sides, but they are in the minority. Just use what works best for you.

Lump
October 9th, 2008, 03:22 PM
Just use what works best for you.

Best answer and the right answer. Short and sweet!:applaud:

Jeff Jotz
October 9th, 2008, 03:58 PM
To echo what a few people already said, I prefer alternate breathing to the left and ride on swims for the following reasons:

you may be getting smacked in the face with waves if you only breathe to one side
the sun may be shining right in your eyes
you are looking for landmarks/trying to navigate

Generally, for the final few hundred yards of an OW swim, I'll breathe every stroke to one side for an extra burst of energy.

Typhoons Coach
October 9th, 2008, 05:06 PM
I liked Typhoons Coach's answer.
I swim mostly distance. I prefer breathing bilaterally, but one side becomes more convenient because I'm always sharing a swim lane with others. When circling, I tend to breathe on the lane divider side because otherwise, I'll probably breathe in somebody's splash.

Now. What about butterfly? I prefer breathing as little as possible because it seems that breathing is less streamlined than not breathing.

For butterfly, I prefer to breath to the side when I am just swimming by myself, but if I am swimming with a group I will breath up. Either way, I like to take a breath every other stroke no matter the distance (as long as I am not swimming over a 200 fly....it's not my best stroke and the lifeguard would have to come and get me!).

mjgold
October 9th, 2008, 05:13 PM
Sometimes when we're doing sprint drills, I breathe (breath is the noun btw) to the side while doing breaststroke so I can see where I'm at in relation to the other guys. It actually helps when I'm tired because it keeps my head down while trying to streamline.

ralphy5555
October 9th, 2008, 11:17 PM
Thanks everybody. I like this place :)

I've always only taken breathes from one side but started bi lateral based on what I've read. But when I saw videos of people I got confused.

So bi lateral is good to know how to do and be comfortable with but do what's best

Thanks

Typhoons Coach
October 10th, 2008, 08:19 AM
(breath is the noun btw)

:whiteflag: I give up! LOL! Thanks for the correction, Michael....forgot the "e"!

Typhoons Coach
October 10th, 2008, 08:21 AM
Thanks everybody. I like this place :)

I've always only taken breathes from one side but started bi lateral based on what I've read. But when I saw videos of people I got confused.

So bi lateral is good to know how to do and be comfortable with but do what's best

Thanks

Not a problem; good luck and keep us updated on your progress...

mjgold
October 10th, 2008, 12:07 PM
:whiteflag: I give up! LOL! Thanks for the correction, Michael....forgot the "e"!

I responded with something that I thought was obviously a joke, but apparently someone didn't think so. :dunno:

Anyway, I wasn't specifically pointing you out, I just wanted to mention it because I always get them screwed up. :duel:

Typhoons Coach
October 10th, 2008, 04:04 PM
I responded with something that I thought was obviously a joke, but apparently someone didn't think so. :dunno:

Anyway, I wasn't specifically pointing you out, I just wanted to mention it because I always get them screwed up. :duel:
It is definitely hard to determine humor on forums, but I knew that you were joking (as was I)....it was/is a light hearted discussion.