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sloswim
October 23rd, 2008, 07:08 PM
New member to this forum.

Used to swim masters for about 6 years, that was 10 years ago. I've been back in the water doing 30-40 min, 1200-1500 yds workouts trying to maintain 4-5 times a week since about two months ago. I'm trying to get back to what I used to do in my masters' workouts 2000-3000 yds in the same time. I know that I have a long way to go to get there, but today I felt slow and weighted down.

Is there some correlation to warm water temps (80-82 degrees) combined with warm air temps (85-90 degrees) and feeling lethargic during workouts?? I felt like I was towing a sea anchor during my workout. I've felt this way before while swimming masters, but never asked anyone about it.

Thanks in advance, any info is appreciated.

Chris

anita
October 24th, 2008, 12:15 AM
I don't have any published studies, only my own experiences. I swim at the Y, where the water averages 84*. The days the water is warmer (86*), I can't get through the day without a nap. This last week the water has been 82-83*. While still too warm, I have not needed a nap, and it has been the first week where I will have swum 5 days without feeling exhausted.
Since this is an indoor pool with some ventilation, it's hard to judge the air temperature, but when it's hot and humid, I sink. It has been 100* the last 2 days at my house, with very low humidity--in the teens--and that may have contributed to my extra energy.
So...I agree with your correlation. Perhaps some 'Zoners could pipe in with their experiences.

scyfreestyler
October 24th, 2008, 12:21 AM
Warm water workouts totally wipe me out. If the ambient air temp is high as well, things only get worse.

hofffam
October 24th, 2008, 10:51 AM
80-82 isn't really warm to me. My pool occasionally gets well above that when the stupid lifeguards don't change the thermostat overnight.

But warm water is definitely more tiring. I notice that I become much more dehydrated swimming in water > 82. I run out of gas much earlier and feel far more exhausted at the end of practice.

ehoch
October 24th, 2008, 11:10 AM
I think your heartrate runs much higher in warm water - that would explain being extra tired. For me - it runs about 12 beats higher on average for the same set / pace.

Aquaholic
October 24th, 2008, 12:02 PM
"Workouts in warm water" suck, 80 isn't bad, 82 is getting too warm
it's difficult to do longer sets at hard paces in warm water.

I suggest you do short swims with longer rest allowing time to cool down between each swim. That should keep you from feeling too over heated.

If it's really warm, 85+ do stroke drills, or spend 5 minutes in 5 minutes out

if it's 105, you're in a hot tub, hold your babe in one arm and a brew in the other


New member to this forum.

Used to swim masters for about 6 years, that was 10 years ago. I've been back in the water doing 30-40 min, 1200-1500 yds workouts trying to maintain 4-5 times a week since about two months ago. I'm trying to get back to what I used to do in my masters' workouts 2000 - 3000 yds in the same time. I know that I have a long way to go to get there, but today I felt slow and weighted down.

Is there some correlation to warm water temps (80-82 degrees) combined with warm air temps (85-90 degrees) and feeling lethargic during workouts?? I felt like I was towing a sea anchor during my workout. I've felt this way before while swimming masters, but never asked anyone about it.

Thanks in advance, any info is appreciated.

Chris

sloswim
October 24th, 2008, 12:37 PM
Thanks all for the info. Glad to read I'm not alone. Its another warm one today, so I'll take a little longer between sets and see it that helps.


Again, thanks for the responses.

Chris

poolraat
October 24th, 2008, 01:14 PM
My pool is kept at about 84. Occasionally it's warmer. That temp is a compromise between those that want a cold pool and the older water exercise people who want a warm pool. It's cooler only when the heating system goes down. :bliss:
I have become used to swimming in a warm pool but still don't like it. I drink lots of water during a workout and about half of the ice water in my bottle gets poured over my head. I will also take longer rest intervals when I feel hot.

ddunbar
October 24th, 2008, 02:47 PM
Warm water swims are not fun. We depend on aerators down here in the swamp to keep the pools relatively cool. I can recall one season as an age group swimmer when our main pool pump went down and we were circulating water from the learn to swim pool which brought the temperature up into the upper 80s. Coaches stood on deck with garden hoses and sprayed us down between sets.

ALM
October 24th, 2008, 11:05 PM
This has been discussed before... You might check out these old threads:

Proper relationship of air to water temperature in an indoor pool
http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?t=2033

Poor ventilation/warm water
http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?t=9902

Help with pool temperature
http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?t=10218

aqualung
October 27th, 2008, 07:34 PM
Warm air sucks too. literally.
Colder air is denser--more oxygen per breath.

Shamboola
October 29th, 2008, 01:48 PM
I cannot handle warm water in the 80 degree plus range. I prefer the water to be in the 77-78 range or I find myself getting queasy.

I seem to be in the minority.

Rob

Redbird Alum
October 30th, 2008, 01:44 PM
I cannot handle warm water in the 80 degree plus range. .... I seem to be in the minority.


Not really, most of the posters above are describing how to deal with the warm water.

When all you have to swim in is warm water, one learns to acclimate. It took me some time to figure out how to swim at the Community Center here... they keep the water warm for the Arthritis and Aerobics classes.

I would go elsewhere, but for the commute time, additional expenses, and lack of any team to work with nearby.

Guvnah
November 11th, 2008, 09:19 AM
I once discussed optimum pool temps with the guy who maintained the pool at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs.

Their studies determined that temps above 84 degrees do not allow your body to dissipate heat adequately, and it forces your body to allocate too much of your energy to heart and lung function instead of your muscles for swimming.

And, because their users (olympic-caliber swimmers) often do very long (hours-long) workouts, and have very low body fat, if the water is too cool they will start to get cold at the end of their workouts.

Because of these factors, they keep their water temp at 80.1 degrees.

gobears
November 11th, 2008, 10:15 AM
We had an interesting situation at our Y a week or so ago. As my swimmers were entering the water they commented on how warm it felt. It's usually 85 degrees for the older folks in the other classes. I said something to the guard who assured me it was no warmer than usual. One of my swimmers had happened to bring his digital thermometer (he'd swum the night before and thought it was too hot). He stuck it in the water and it read 92. So the guard talks to the maintenance guy and he goes to check the (mercury) thermometer. He insists it's 85. He then goes to get his little laser thermometer (forget the technical term). I'm with him as he points it at the water. It reads 91. Then there is a mad scrambling to fix the problem.

So much for mercury thermometers. Sometimes it pays to bring your more technologically advanced thermometer to the pool...

Typhoons Coach
November 11th, 2008, 10:19 AM
We had an interesting situation at our Y a week or so ago. As my swimmers were entering the water they commented on how warm it felt. It's usually 85 degrees for the older folks in the other classes. I said something to the guard who assured me it was no warmer than usual. One of my swimmers had happened to bring his digital thermometer (he'd swum the night before and thought it was too hot). He stuck it in the water and it read 92. So the guard talks to the maintenance guy and he goes to check the (mercury) thermometer. He insists it's 85. He then goes to get his little laser thermometer (forget the technical term). I'm with him as he points it at the water. It reads 91. Then there is a mad scrambling to fix the problem.

So much for mercury thermometers. Sometimes it pays to bring your more technologically advanced thermometer to the pool...

Most of the pool that I have managed do a "double check" system with a mercury thermometer as well as a digital thermometer in the filter room/pump house. It's never fun swimming in warm water, but most pools do have to keep a temperature that all patrons can handle. We keep our pool at 83 right now which seems to please almost everyone.

I know that my swimmers bring extra empty bottles to fill up with cold water that they dump over themselves during a difficult set...

mjgold
November 11th, 2008, 12:18 PM
I used to be okay in warm water, because the pool at my gym is probably close to 88 degrees. Ever since I joined my team, I can't do a full workout in the gym pool anymore because the team pool is 80 degrees maximum. I went to the gym pool yesterday, and I kept having to stop and rub the cold water bottle on my head because I was getting overheated.