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Aqua Jock
November 6th, 2008, 04:56 PM
The New Team
Rahm Emanuel


By CARL HULSE (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/h/carl_hulse/index.html?inline=nyt-per)

Published: November 6, 2008
As he prepares to take office, President-elect Barack Obama is relying on a small team of advisers who will lead his transition operation and help choose the members of a new Obama administration. Following is part of a series of profiles of potential members of the administration.
Skip to next paragraph (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/06/us/politics/06emanuel.html#secondParagraph) Enlarge This Image (http://javascript<b></b>:pop_me_up2('http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/11/05/us/05rahm.1.inline.ready.html', '05rahm_1_inline_ready', 'width=720,height=600,scrollbars=yes,toolbars=no,r esizable=yes'))
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Rahm Emanuel in August.
Times Topics: The New Team (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/us/series/the_new_team/index.html)

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Name: Rahm Emanuel

New job: Has accepted Mr. Obama's offer to be the White House chief of staff.

Will bring to the job: An unusual hybrid of high-level experience as a top adviser to President Bill Clinton together with proven expertise as a Congressional leader and political strategist. Mr. Emanuel is also a close friend of Mr. Obama, a fellow Chicagoan.
As the No. 4 Democrat in the House and an architect of the Democratic majority, Mr. Emanuel knows Congress from the inside out after winning his seat in 2002. In the Clinton administration, he was aggressive, frequently profane and instrumental in shaping domestic policy on issues like health care, welfare and trade.
He earned the nickname Rahmbo for his determination and take-no-prisoners approach — an advantage when trying to bring a thorny issue to resolution, but a style that can be off-putting to those accustomed to gentility. Mr. Obama might also decide to keep Mr. Emanuel on Capitol Hill to protect his flank, and the Democratic House majority. Should he resign his seat, Mr. Emanuel would be relinquishing a promising House career and aspirations to become speaker.

Is linked to Obama by: His Second City roots (Mr. Emanuel represents a slice of the north side of Chicago and adjoining suburbs) and his ties to the family of Mayor Richard M. Daley, which has been a source of support, guidance and experience for Mr. Emanuel, who was initially known for his fund-raising skills.
Mr. Obama has been close to Mr. Emanuel since arriving on Capitol Hill; Mr. Emanuel considers David Axelrod, Mr. Obama’s chief strategist, to be one of his closest friends. The three share a common policy view and would make a formidable triumvirate in the White House. Mr. Emanuel found himself under pressure during the Democratic presidential primaries to back Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, given his relationship with her husband. But he stayed neutral and ultimately endorsed Mr. Obama.

In his own words: “We’re going to put in front of the American people the fundamental question of this election: Who’s going to change the economic policies in Washington that resulted in a lower standard of living for middle-class families?” From an Obama campaign conference call with reporters on Sept. 12, 2008.

Used to work as: An investment banker for three years after leaving the White House and before being elected to the House. He banked $16 million while handling mergers and acquisitions with an emphasis on utilities. In his youth, Mr. Emanuel badly cut a finger on a meat slicer while working at an Arby’s. The wound became infected, and he lost half of the middle finger on his right hand. The shortened digit is something of a trademark.

Carries as baggage: Mr. Emanuel’s stint in high finance and his experience in the banking world opens him to some criticism of being too allied with Wall Street, not the image Democrats want to cultivate these days. Critics have asserted he was only able to succeed in the banking world because of his political connections. Since he is part of the Daley circle, Mr. Emanuel’s appointment as chief of staff could also create the appearance of a White House that is too Chicago heavy. His manner can also create enemies, and Mr. Emanuel has ruffled the feathers of many on Capitol Hill, particularly black and Hispanic lawmakers.

Is otherwise known for: Training as a ballet dancer. And his brother, Ari Emanuel, a Hollywood agent, is the model for the abrasive agent Ari Gold in the HBO series “Entourage.”

Biography includes: Born Nov. 29, 1959, in Chicago ... liberal arts degree from Sarah Lawrence College, masters from Northwestern ... married to Amy Rule, three children ... a regular swimmer and a voracious reader, using his hours aboard airplanes to consume books ... served briefly as a civilian volunteer on an Israeli military base during the Persian Gulf war of 1991.

from: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/06/us/politics/06emanuel.html

mattson
November 6th, 2008, 05:25 PM
... a regular swimmer and a voracious reader, using his hours aboard airplanes to consume books

That makes him sound like Cookie Monster, eating all those books. :afraid:

I'd be even more impressed if he was a regular reader, voracious swimmer, and spent hours on airplanes in an EndlessPool.

tjrpatt
November 6th, 2008, 07:03 PM
What do it mean to be a regular swimmer? If you swim 40 to 80 laps three times a week, is that considered regular, just wondering?

As someone who spent hours on an Endless pool a few weekends ago, It is not a good idea. An hour on an endless pool is just enough.

Kurt Dickson
November 6th, 2008, 07:58 PM
I would say a "regular swimmer" means he wants a shot at Jeff Erwin or Hochstein. Actually, it's probably how people say they are triathletes after they do a single sprint triathlon or a runner after they do a single turkey trot.

aquageek
November 7th, 2008, 07:14 AM
Actually, it's probably how people say they are triathletes after they do a single sprint triathlon or a runner after they do a single turkey trot.

The only thing AFTER about them calling themselves triathletes is after they register for the event. I've never seen a sport that heaps such accolades and status upon people who have absolutely no proficiency in the actual sport.

Kurt Dickson
November 7th, 2008, 09:40 AM
The only thing AFTER about them calling themselves triathletes is after they register for the event. I've never seen a sport that heaps such accolades and status upon people who have absolutely no proficiency in the actual sport.

Agree; I did a sprint triathlon last week in which there were two 300 ++ lb. people who took 40 minutes to complete the 400 meter swim :cheerleader:(I don't believe they finished the race).

Also, I did Ironman Couer d'Alene one year and I was on some lake dinner tour afterward with a guy who actually had the stones to buy (and wear) an IM CDA finisher jacket and did not actually finish the race.

TheGoodSmith
November 7th, 2008, 10:47 AM
A "regular swimmer" could mean anything from a flowered bathing cap to 15,000 a week.


John Smith

aquageek
November 7th, 2008, 11:22 AM
...IM CDA finisher jacket and did not actually finish the race.

Dollars to donuts he also had the M dot tattoo. Other than the Ironman races, just finishing a tri doesn't mean squat.

famelec
November 7th, 2008, 11:30 AM
It's good that he's been working on his swimming. A few years ago he did some sprint triathlons (maybe he's done more since?).

At the 2003 Accenture Chicago Triathlon
Swim pace 2:19 over 750 meters
Bike pace 19.9 mph over 13.6 miles
Run pace 8:09 over 3.1 miles
Overall place 194 of 1105

While none of his splits are particularly impressive (he was 40 at the time I believe), his swim split stands out as the slowest of the three. Oddly enough, he placed higher in the swim than in the bike or run, which tells you something about the state of swimming in triathlons, or maybe that the water was very rough that day, or the distance of the course not accurate...

In any case, I'd much rather have a "regular swimmer" (maybe a 3 times a week rec swimmer?) helping run our country than a couch potato.

Brian

Doug Adamavich
November 7th, 2008, 11:31 AM
What I am wondering is if Rahm will join a team with Potomac Masters...

Would his Secret Service detail have to swim in the lanes parallel to his?

Would he go back to do the Big Shoulders swim?

I think the last known pol who was a swimmer was Paul Tsongas from Massachusetts.

Oh, Teddy Kennedy was an open water swimmer, once... :bolt:



NOTE: tongue in cheek

Chris Stevenson
November 7th, 2008, 11:44 AM
I think the last known pol who was a swimmer was Paul Tsongas from Massachusetts.

I remember him at a masters meet in NC.

What's sort of funny: if I saw a presidential candidate do a 200 fly in competition, I'd probably be more inclined to vote for that persion. It indicates his/her fortitude! (Or maybe insanity? Recklessness?) :)

Then again, if said politician was proven to be a serious sandbagger...who can believe anything s/he says? Fort, you aren't running for office, right?

(DEFINITELY tongue-in-cheek!)

lefty
November 7th, 2008, 12:16 PM
Would his Secret Service detail have to swim in the lanes parallel to his?




No SS detail for a chief of staff ( I know it was a joke, but just in case you didnt know....)

elise526
November 7th, 2008, 01:03 PM
Swim distances in triathlons, unless done in a pool, are never accurate. Also, transition time (the time to get to your bike) is sometimes lumped onto the swim.

If it makes people happy to call themselves triathletes after they have finished a triathlon, then let them be happy about it. Distance shouldn't matter. Usain Bolt most certainly can call himself a runner without doing a marathon.

I have noticed that some folks resort to doing Ironman triathlons because they get their butts kicked in a shorter triathlon. They figure they'd rather channel their determination and obsessive-compulsive tendencies into a positive avenue by doing an Ironman. Good for them, but the sprint triathletes that kicked their butts are no less triathletes.


It's good that he's been working on his swimming. A few years ago he did some sprint triathlons (maybe he's done more since?).

At the 2003 Accenture Chicago Triathlon
Swim pace 2:19 over 750 meters
Bike pace 19.9 mph over 13.6 miles
Run pace 8:09 over 3.1 miles
Overall place 194 of 1105

While none of his splits are particularly impressive (he was 40 at the time I believe), his swim split stands out as the slowest of the three. Oddly enough, he placed higher in the swim than in the bike or run, which tells you something about the state of swimming in triathlons, or maybe that the water was very rough that day, or the distance of the course not accurate...

In any case, I'd much rather have a "regular swimmer" (maybe a 3 times a week rec swimmer?) helping run our country than a couch potato.

Brian

mjgold
November 7th, 2008, 01:14 PM
I was going to ask what makes someone an actual triathlete if completing a triathlon isn't good enough.

Surfergirl
November 7th, 2008, 01:46 PM
don't blame emanuel, someone from the media probably asked him if he exercises and he probably said he's swum on occasion and they translated that into regular swimmer

PJElder
November 7th, 2008, 02:37 PM
I have raced the Accenture Race before and the swim leg is not over until you run about a half mile to the transition area before the swim leg ends which takes about 3-3.5 minutes on average. I imagine that could be part of his slowness.

The bike split, while not great, is pretty solid since you are biking along Lake Shore Drive with tons of potholes and cars passing you and you usually have a strong crosswind off the lake.

I did an Ironman in 2003 instead of Accenture, so I guess I was a real triathlete back then according to the above criteria. Now I am trying to find enough time to make myself respectable at swimming again.

Kurt Dickson
November 7th, 2008, 02:43 PM
I was going to ask what makes someone an actual triathlete if completing a triathlon isn't good enough.

I think the point was that triathlons, more than most sports, have become something for the masses (which I think is good) but does not imply any proficiency. If I say I'm a plumber, it implies I can fix a leaky fawcett among other things. If I say I'm a triathlete, it can mean I can do a sub 2 hour Olympic distance triathlon or it could mean, I own a swim suit, snorkel mask, running shoes, a 1974 Schwinn Varsity, and on occasion, use them in sequence.

I personally don't care what people call themselves (I prefer to call myself a bitter, broken-down ex-swimmer who likes to do triathlons. turn-ons--long walks on the beach; turn-offs--work, mean people, cloudy days).

Rahm, I now pronounce you a regular swimmer.

aquageek
November 7th, 2008, 02:48 PM
Certainly the same thing said about triathletes could be said about people who claim to be swimmers. To me a swimmer is a person who trains a few times a week and competes a few times a year. To most a swimmer is a person in board shorts and a noodle. So, we are not immune from the scrutiny.

Kurt - do you also like puppies and romantic candle light dinners by a fire on a bear-skin rug?

famelec
November 7th, 2008, 02:49 PM
I have raced the Accenture Race before and the swim leg is not over until you run about a half mile to the transition area before the swim leg ends which takes about 3-3.5 minutes on average. I imagine that could be part of his slowness.



That would explain a lot. From the results it just looked like Chicago triathletes were particularly slow swimmers!

As for his bike and run, they're solid times. He's by no means slow. But since he's slower than me, it's hard for me to be impressed! ;)

mjgold
November 7th, 2008, 03:05 PM
Gotcha. I was just confused because if someone does triathlons, to me that makes them a triathlete. But, I see how that is not really true if they do triathlons once in a blue moon or can't finish one (or can only finish one in an extremely slow time like myself--if it weren't for the running, I'd be fine!). The analogy to swimming is pretty accurate I think. I have yet to meet someone who claims to be a swimmer but can barely swim a competitive stroke. The people on my team that do triathlons don't consider themselves triathletes even though they do a bunch every year (one does, but she really is).

Mary1912
November 7th, 2008, 04:17 PM
If he is a regular swimmer he probably won't have much time to be a regular swimmer now. From what I understand Chief of Staff is a extremely grueling and time-consuming job.

elise526
November 7th, 2008, 04:40 PM
I have lots of respect for those that complete an Ironman. They are indeed triathletes. They usually are pretty nice folks as long as they don't think I'm less of an athlete for sticking to Olympic distances and shorter.

So, I guess not only can we say that Emanuel is a swimmer, but he is also a triathlete. :D

Chris Stevenson
November 7th, 2008, 04:45 PM
A triathlete friend of mine calls them "I-did-athons." He also competes in occasional OW races and thinks there is far less of this attitude in swim races.

I don't think the situation with triathlons/triathletes is all that much different than running and road races.

My friend also talks somewhat disparagingly of how easy it has now become (in his opinion) to qualify for some of the more prestigious marathons. He freely admits to being a run-snob.

For better or worse, I don't think swimming as a sport lends itself as easily to casual acquaintance. IMO even "mediocre" masters swimmers are far, far better swimmers than the average person on the street, or even the typical lap swimmer.

mjgold
November 7th, 2008, 04:49 PM
Yeah, except the typical lap swimmer thinks he's as good as even the mediocre masters swimmer. There are a few people at the gym I go to that swim some laps after they lift weights. They think that because it's part of their workout, swimming competitively is easy and shouldn't be considered a real sport, nevermind that it takes them 30 seconds to swim 25 yards, and they have to take a 2 minute rest between lengths because they're practically sprinting.

aztimm
November 7th, 2008, 07:12 PM
[QUOTE=aquageek;159589]Certainly the same thing said about triathletes could be said about people who claim to be swimmers. To me a swimmer is a person who trains a few times a week and competes a few times a year. [QUOTE]

By your definition, about 90% of swimmers registered with USMS wouldn't be swimmers.

I generally swim about 5 times a week, but haven't competed in a meet for over 5 years. So I guess I'm not a swimmer.

Chris Stevenson
November 7th, 2008, 07:58 PM
Yeah, except the typical lap swimmer thinks he's as good as even the mediocre masters swimmer.

Perhaps, though that hasn't been my experience. Whenever I see a reasonably fast lap swimmer, if I ask them to consider practicing with the masters group, they usually demur because (a) it is "too serious" and/or (b) they don't feel they can keep up.

It is probably human nature that when a newbie shows up at a masters swim practice, they will immediately notice the fastest swimmers and be discouraged, rather than looking at the slower lanes. The terminology and practice structure is also a little intimidating if you aren't used to it.

mjgold
November 7th, 2008, 08:04 PM
I guess it's just where I live and my age group. Younger people in South Jersey tend to think they're the cat's pajamas no matter what.

scyfreestyler
November 8th, 2008, 02:09 PM
Is also known to drop the "f" bomb as a term of endearment. Can only give the "f" bomb with one of his hands as the other middle finger was lost in his younger days. It seems he cut himself and instead of having it treated properly, he opted to swim. An infection developed and some amputation was required.

Michael Heather
November 8th, 2008, 09:32 PM
The New Team
Rahm Emanuel


By CARL HULSE (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/h/carl_hulse/index.html?inline=nyt-per)

Published: November 6, 2008
As he prepares to take office, President-elect Barack Obama is relying on a small team of advisers who will lead his transition operation and help choose the members of a new Obama administration. Following is part of a series of profiles of potential members of the administration.
Skip to next paragraph (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/06/us/politics/06emanuel.html#secondParagraph) Enlarge This Image (http://javascript<b></b>:pop_me_up2('http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/11/05/us/05rahm.1.inline.ready.html', '05rahm_1_inline_ready', 'width=720,height=600,scrollbars=yes,toolbars=no,r esizable=yes'))
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Rahm Emanuel in August.
Times Topics: The New Team (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/us/series/the_new_team/index.html)

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Name: Rahm Emanuel

New job: Has accepted Mr. Obama's offer to be the White House chief of staff.

Will bring to the job: An unusual hybrid of high-level experience as a top adviser to President Bill Clinton together with proven expertise as a Congressional leader and political strategist. Mr. Emanuel is also a close friend of Mr. Obama, a fellow Chicagoan.
As the No. 4 Democrat in the House and an architect of the Democratic majority, Mr. Emanuel knows Congress from the inside out after winning his seat in 2002. In the Clinton administration, he was aggressive, frequently profane and instrumental in shaping domestic policy on issues like health care, welfare and trade.
He earned the nickname Rahmbo for his determination and take-no-prisoners approach — an advantage when trying to bring a thorny issue to resolution, but a style that can be off-putting to those accustomed to gentility. Mr. Obama might also decide to keep Mr. Emanuel on Capitol Hill to protect his flank, and the Democratic House majority. Should he resign his seat, Mr. Emanuel would be relinquishing a promising House career and aspirations to become speaker.

Is linked to Obama by: His Second City roots (Mr. Emanuel represents a slice of the north side of Chicago and adjoining suburbs) and his ties to the family of Mayor Richard M. Daley, which has been a source of support, guidance and experience for Mr. Emanuel, who was initially known for his fund-raising skills.
Mr. Obama has been close to Mr. Emanuel since arriving on Capitol Hill; Mr. Emanuel considers David Axelrod, Mr. Obama’s chief strategist, to be one of his closest friends. The three share a common policy view and would make a formidable triumvirate in the White House. Mr. Emanuel found himself under pressure during the Democratic presidential primaries to back Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, given his relationship with her husband. But he stayed neutral and ultimately endorsed Mr. Obama.

In his own words: “We’re going to put in front of the American people the fundamental question of this election: Who’s going to change the economic policies in Washington that resulted in a lower standard of living for middle-class families?” From an Obama campaign conference call with reporters on Sept. 12, 2008.

Used to work as: An investment banker for three years after leaving the White House and before being elected to the House. He banked $16 million while handling mergers and acquisitions with an emphasis on utilities. In his youth, Mr. Emanuel badly cut a finger on a meat slicer while working at an Arby’s. The wound became infected, and he lost half of the middle finger on his right hand. The shortened digit is something of a trademark.

Carries as baggage: Mr. Emanuel’s stint in high finance and his experience in the banking world opens him to some criticism of being too allied with Wall Street, not the image Democrats want to cultivate these days. Critics have asserted he was only able to succeed in the banking world because of his political connections. Since he is part of the Daley circle, Mr. Emanuel’s appointment as chief of staff could also create the appearance of a White House that is too Chicago heavy. His manner can also create enemies, and Mr. Emanuel has ruffled the feathers of many on Capitol Hill, particularly black and Hispanic lawmakers.

Is otherwise known for: Training as a ballet dancer. And his brother, Ari Emanuel, a Hollywood agent, is the model for the abrasive agent Ari Gold in the HBO series “Entourage.”

Biography includes: Born Nov. 29, 1959, in Chicago ... liberal arts degree from Sarah Lawrence College, masters from Northwestern ... married to Amy Rule, three children ... a regular swimmer and a voracious reader, using his hours aboard airplanes to consume books ... served briefly as a civilian volunteer on an Israeli military base during the Persian Gulf war of 1991.

from: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/06/us/politics/06emanuel.html





How does this possibly contribute in any meaningful way to the forums?







Is the "new team" entering a relay somewhere?






I am frankly baffled that anyone took the time to post this, and further mystified that it continues to take space on the forums.

scyfreestyler
November 8th, 2008, 09:46 PM
Yes, because bandwidth is so precious.

gull
November 9th, 2008, 01:09 PM
How does this possibly contribute in any meaningful way to the forums?







Is the "new team" entering a relay somewhere?






I am frankly baffled that anyone took the time to post this, and further mystified that it continues to take space on the forums.


Perhaps you'll have better luck in four years.

mattson
November 9th, 2008, 04:36 PM
How does this possibly contribute in any meaningful way to the forums?

Is the "new team" entering a relay somewhere?

I am frankly baffled that anyone took the time to post this, and further mystified that it continues to take space on the forums.

You'll notice that all of the responders (including myself) skipped over the "War & Peace"-sized bio, and have discussed what it means to be a "regular" swimmer.

craiglll@yahoo.com
November 10th, 2008, 04:20 AM
What I am wondering is if Rahm will join a team with Potomac Masters...

Would his Secret Service detail have to swim in the lanes parallel to his?

Would he go back to do the Big Shoulders swim?

I think the last known pol who was a swimmer was Paul Tsongas from Massachusetts.

Oh, Teddy Kennedy was an open water swimmer, once... :bolt:



NOTE: tongue in cheek
Maybe he will join the DCAC. i wonder where he swims in DC. Does the Congressional gym have a pool?

Big point is how many of those listed are Knox Grads. At least 2. Yeah John Podeista. So many talking heads talk about it looking white and very Princeton/Harvard. It looks very small Liberal Arts college to me.

craiglll@yahoo.com
November 10th, 2008, 04:22 AM
I am not implying anything about Mr. Emmanuel. It is just that DCAC are fun to swim with and they swim in a lot of different places.

mattson
November 10th, 2008, 07:23 AM
After a short off-line discussion with Michael, he does have a point about posting of articles (http://forums.usms.org/faq.php?faq=rulestitle#faq_articlesrule).


Generally you can assume that anything you find online is copyrighted. We prefer you post a synopsis in your own words and the link to the article. It's permissible to quote up to 20 lines of text and you must provide commentary. DO NOT POST ENTIRE ARTICLES.

gull
November 10th, 2008, 08:54 AM
After a short off-line discussion with Michael, he does have a point about posting of articles (http://forums.usms.org/faq.php?faq=rulestitle#faq_articlesrule).

After my own off-line discussion with Michael, I think he is being disingenuous if he implied to you that copyright infringement is his main issue with this thread.

scyfreestyler
November 10th, 2008, 10:05 AM
Somewhat related to swimming, Rahm once sent a dead stinky fish to a political consultant whom he was not pleased with. If he had issues with lane sharing at a workout, something tells me he would not post on USMS looking for advice on how to best handle the situation.

Michael Heather
November 10th, 2008, 10:08 AM
I make every effort to be very clear when I post. That is obviously a failed element in my first post.

The point was that most of the article was irrelevant and could just as easily have been posted as a link, which is done with some regularity on these forums.

To address the question at hand, is he a regular swimmer by his own admission (still a vague term), or was the term planted by a helpful copywriter? I guess the opposite would not exist - a regular drowner. Obviously many more questions than answers.

Steve Ruiter
November 10th, 2008, 12:54 PM
Egads.

The man swims on a regular basis.

Obviously there could be more details given on this in the article, but that is not the point. There might just be more important things in the world than, say, his time for the 100 free.

swimshark
November 11th, 2008, 07:03 AM
In an article yesterday, they said he was a triathlete. So the guy has gone from a "regular swimmer" from a triathlete within a week. Next week he'll be an Ironman!