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chaos
November 16th, 2008, 04:16 PM
Anyone swimming with it?

inflictfreedom
November 16th, 2008, 07:35 PM
What It Is
High blood pressure in the arteries that supply the lungs is called pulmonary hypertension (PHT). The blood pressure measured by cuff on your arm isn't directly related to the pressure in your lungs. The blood vessels that supply the lungs constrict and their walls thicken, so they can't carry as much blood. As in a kinked garden hose, pressure builds up and backs up. The heart works harder, trying to force the blood through. If the pressure is high enough, eventually the heart can't keep up, and less blood can circulate through the lungs to pick up oxygen. Patients then become tired, dizzy and short of breath. If a pre-existing disease triggered the PHT, doctors call it secondary PHT. That's because it's secondary to another problem, such as a heart or lung disorder. Congenital heart disease can cause PHT.
It's important to repair congenital heart problems (when possible) before permanent pulmonary hypertensive changes develop. Intracardiac left-to-right shunts (such as a ventricular or atrial septal defect, a hole in the wall between the two ventricles or atria) can cause too much blood flow through the lungs. This situation is sometimes called Eisenmenger complex. Heart valve conditions, such as mitral stenosis (a narrowing of the mitral valve), can also cause PHT. Fixing the valve usually reverses the PHT.

chaos
November 16th, 2008, 09:44 PM
[B] . Congenital heart disease can cause PHT.
It's important to repair congenital heart problems (when possible) before permanent pulmonary hypertensive changes develop. Intracardiac left-to-right shunts (such as a ventricular or atrial septal defect, a hole in the wall between the two ventricles or atria) can cause too much blood flow through the lungs. This situation is sometimes called Eisenmenger complex. Heart valve conditions, such as mitral stenosis (a narrowing of the mitral valve), can also cause PHT. Fixing the valve usually reverses the PHT.

thanks for the info. thats already more than my dr has told me.

chaos
November 27th, 2008, 01:48 AM
ok, after a nuke stress, there appears to be some ASD going on. cardio catheterization next step and then.......we'll see.

my heart is my second favorite organ.

jim thornton
November 27th, 2008, 02:53 PM
Dave, I just looked up ASD and from what I read, it looks like you might have had an undiagnosed "hole in the heart" from childhood. Definitely keep us posted here. It sounds like they can surgically repair the defect, which could help with the pulmonary hypertension, though it's possible you might require some medication, too. In any event, your multiple fans out here wish you the best of all possible prognoses! Good luck!

PS I think I vaguely remember reading about the possible use of Viagra for pulmonary hypertension in high altitude climbers. I suppose if you HAVE to take medication, this would be one of the better ones to have to take.

chaos
November 27th, 2008, 08:56 PM
Dave, I just looked up ASD and from what I read, it looks like you might have had an undiagnosed "hole in the heart" from childhood. Definitely keep us posted here. It sounds like they can surgically repair the defect, which could help with the pulmonary hypertension, though it's possible you might require some medication, too. In any event, your multiple fans out here wish you the best of all possible prognoses! Good luck!

PS I think I vaguely remember reading about the possible use of Viagra for pulmonary hypertension in high altitude climbers. I suppose if you HAVE to take medication, this would be one of the better ones to have to take.

thanks jim.
i believe that the "hole" has always been there. i suppose if it was bigger it would have been diagnosed sooner.
if viagra were a necessary medication......at least i'm not a backstroker!

Ripple
November 28th, 2008, 08:57 AM
Best of luck on the surgery.
You said on your blog that you wanted to live at least as long as Mick Jagger. I'm sure you'll make his chronological age (65) and no doubt his apparent cellular age (89-90) as well. :)

gull
November 28th, 2008, 09:55 AM
I usually recommend a transesophageal echo (TEE) to better visualize the ASD. Many can be closed with an umbrella-like device deployed nonsurgically through a catheter. Prognosis is usually excellent unless the pulmonary hypertension is severe. Good luck.

chaos
November 28th, 2008, 10:37 AM
I usually recommend a transesophageal echo (TEE) to better visualize the ASD. Many can be closed with an umbrella-like device deployed nonsurgically through a catheter. Prognosis is usually excellent unless the pulmonary hypertension is severe. Good luck.

would the TEE be performed during the catheterization?

i believe this is the next procedure i am scheduled for, but i'm not expecting any additional info until after the holiday weekend.

gull
November 28th, 2008, 10:52 AM
would the TEE be performed during the catheterization?

No. It is a separate outpatient procedure. A TEE is similar to an endoscopy; you are sedated and an ultrasound probe is placed in your esophagus, which passes directly behind the heart. It provides a very clear picture of structures and abnormalities within the heart.

The primary reason to perform a cardiac cath is to look for coronary artery disease. An ASD will not be visualized, but its presence can be confirmed by measuring the blood oxygen saturation in different chambers/vessels.

SwimStud
November 28th, 2008, 11:37 AM
Dave, sorry to hear of this aggravation for you. Just don't think you're using it as an excuse at the Quassy swim next year though!
;)

Ken Koppenhaver
November 30th, 2008, 05:21 PM
Dave,

The TEE is the gold standard to determine if your truly have an ASD. About 3.5 years ago I had an ASD closed using an Amplatzer closure device. The important thing is that they've found your condition prior to any long term problems. Get it taken care of and you should be back better than ever for the Bay swim next year. Good luck.

chaos
November 30th, 2008, 07:04 PM
Dave,

The TEE is the gold standard to determine if your truly have an ASD. About 3.5 years ago I had an ASD closed using an Amplatzer closure device. The important thing is that they've found your condition prior to any long term problems. Get it taken care of and you should be back better than ever for the Bay swim next year. Good luck.

thanks ken.
i like the sound of that "better than ever" part.

jim thornton
November 30th, 2008, 11:20 PM
Dave, you might consider changing your picture on this thread.

It almost looks like you're glancing wistfully towards the other side, where Don Ameche and the rest of them have flown off to rejuvenate...

Maybe something with a bow tie and a thumb's up?

chaos
December 3rd, 2008, 10:23 PM
well, today was cardio cath day at st. peters in albany.... not a day i was looking forward to, but everyone kept reassuring me that the procedure was painless; and for the most part... it was. i spent last night reading the lit that the hospital sent me about the cath and the types of hardware (stents) that seemed likely to be joined with my anatomy. needless to say; there was very little sleeping to be had by yours truly.

alarm goes off at 6:00 and we are on the road at 6:30. (my sis-in-law is a speed demon so we arrive 1/2 hour early). sign papers - hospital gown and silly socks with grippy bottoms - check vitals - I V drip - off we go to the cath lab holding area. i booked the second appointment of the day (i figure the doc will get warmed up on someone else) its cold in here but being the "non wetsuit" type i choose to tuff it out sans the blankets that are being offered every twenty seconds.

my turn in the lab. some happy juice is injected into my IV... some shaving (hey be careful down there)... and now some blankets that feel like they just came out of the dryer. there is a monitor near my head so i can watch the cath as it pokes around my heart. its true, no pain, no discomfort.

good news, you could drive a truck through my arteries, so, no hardware necessary. i'll be going home tonight....all i have to do is clot!

about 1 1/2 hours post op, i pop my clot while reaching for a pot to piss in... damn i sure can bleed. a nurse is alerted and applies a vulcan death pinch to my groin that she holds for twenty minutes. (thats going to leave a mark) now on top of a hematoma the size of a regulation volley ball a 10 pound sand bag is placed (new dressing of course) only three more hours of lying here.

well, it hurts like hell when i walk but i'm happy about the clear arteries.
i will have a talk with my cardiologist tomorrow. i suspect a TEE will be prescribed for me before the bruise in my groin disappears.

The Fortress
December 3rd, 2008, 10:27 PM
Thanks for the detailed update, Dave. :bighug: I'm glad a truck can be driven through your arteries.

SwimStud
December 3rd, 2008, 10:45 PM
Good news Dave! Doubled with the knowledge that you repulsed Geek with talk of shaving "down there!"

Blackbeard's Peg
December 3rd, 2008, 11:10 PM
excellent news! :applaud: