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eliana2003
May 4th, 2003, 08:01 AM
Hey- can anyone out there recommend workouts for a mile open water swim?

peace...

Dominick Aielloeaver
May 4th, 2003, 02:44 PM
Well first open water is alittle intemidating.If you had not swam in open water, ina while . In apool you have 4-walls aceling and afloor. In other words everything is square. But assuming you are aperson who can do amile or two, nonstop in apool , would not be to diffcult. For you to do open water swim. Just pace your self. once you get going you will be fine. Dom.

Dominick Aielloeaver
May 4th, 2003, 02:58 PM
Elaine .One more thing. My work out in a pool is the equvlent of open water swim. I swim in a pool . Because, Idont have near by access to a lake or the ocean. But never the less, this is how I work, so that if I ever get backto open water I wont have much trouble. I have a three phase workout. First 100 laps is moderate speed. 2nd. 50 laps is distance the next 50 laps is endurance. This is done in a 25 meter pool. All aus. crawal or free style. I do this mon, & fri.

Perkunas
May 13th, 2003, 08:23 PM
http://www.triathletemag.com/story.cfm?story_id=1530&pageID=1732

This article inspired me into open water swimming. Kostich's recommended workout is the basis for how I now train, although alter it for my ability and time. I suggest scaling the distances based upon the distance you intend to swim. I shorten each swim by 100M, but only swim events less than 2 miles. Paddles scare me based on the shoulder war stories I've heard. Hope this helps...

u352
May 13th, 2003, 09:50 PM
You guys are scaring the crap out of me. My training in the pool as a first time long distance swimmer is between 1500m daily and over 3,000 daily. I mix it up but the way that article sounds I am doomed to fail in my swim coming up in June of 4.5 miles(Bay Bridge swim). I do a longer swim once a week of 2 to 3 miles. My goal is to finish and now I am freaked out that my training isn't enough.

:confused: :eek: :p :D

Fisch
May 13th, 2003, 10:17 PM
u352,
Last spring I decided to do a 5 mile open water swim in late June.
I'm a pretty ordinary Masters swimmer [50 years old] and was swimming ~3000
yds/day 4x/week . For about 5 weeks before the swim, I upped
the yardage to 4000-5000/day 2x/week and 3500/yds 2x/week. Just long steady, boring stuff. Finished
the swim tired, but not anywhere close to exhausted. Was first in my age group [and beat a bunch of youngsters, too:D ]

You can do it.

Leonard Jansen
May 14th, 2003, 08:30 AM
U352 -

I have no doubt that you can make it based on your training. Admittedly, if the Bay swim is your first, I might have suggested something a little shorter, but you are fine. The thing that you need to remember is to R-E-L-A-X and don't get caught up in the details. Just swim and keep swimming, take a moment here and there to enjoy the view and when you finish you'll have earned some goodie/treat (ice cream, beer, whatever - indulge!). The only information that I would be certain to get before the start of the race, is the direction and expected speed of the tide as it can sweep you under the bridge span if you are on the wrong side. They usually announce this over the loudspeaker before the race.

Pace it, don't race it!

-LBJ

Perkunas
May 14th, 2003, 08:53 PM
U352,

I apologize if my reference to Kostich's article scared you. The article motivated me into open water swims and provided a structure I use for my work outs. Swimming a "ladder" while targeting efforts too gave my workouts something new. It seems the swimmers near me either go straight for an hour, or do 50's and 100's on some interval for an hour. Hopefully you and others will find something positive in the article.

Those responding to your post gave great advice too. Pace yourself, acknowledge the potential effects of currents, reward yourself, etc.

The swimming you've indicated is sufficient preparation to complete the event. Don't over do the start, swim your own speed, and your first experience will be great. Feeling a bit jittery is normal. And many will question if they should have trained more, or if they trained too much, regardless of their experience and performance.

So have fun preparing for, and finishing, your Bay Bridge Swim.

eliana2003
May 15th, 2003, 06:29 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by u352
[B]You guys are scaring the crap out of me. My training in the pool as a first time long distance swimmer is between 1500m daily and over 3,000 daily. ]

That's ok- they scared the heck out of me, as well!! I did find the article useful, especially the reference to the sharks. One of the things that really frightens me is having a run-in with a shark... gulp... any advice on that one? :eek:


peace...

Leonard Jansen
May 15th, 2003, 10:07 AM
You are vastly more likely to die in a car accident driving to/from the event than you are to be attacked by a shark. I can only think of one (1) shark incident in an open water race and that was a few years ago in Hawaii and it was menacing, not necessarily an attack.
Here are the things I'd be aware of based on experience:
1) Jellyfish - Stung many times. I got stung so bad I was bleeding in a race in Atlantic City, NJ.
2) Getting smacked in the head by debris - Board to the head in rough seas off NJ coast.
3) Drunks in boats - Almost run over by a Canadian sailboat in Lake Champlain. The coast guard took care of that issue quite nicely. I also did get run over by a kayak in The Little Red Lighthouse race in NYC last year.
4) Fellow competitors - Have taken elbows/fists/feet to the head/groin/stomach more times than I can count. Several years ago I had to drag a petite teenage girl out of the surf when she had been soundly clocked by a fellow competitor.

So, forget the sharks, pay attention when driving to/from the race and be careful of PEOPLE.

Rob Copeland
May 15th, 2003, 10:39 AM
Leonard had some great points. And just a few more thoughts.

For anyone with a fear of whatís in the water, I would recommend reading Shark Trouble: True Stories About Sharks and the Sea -- by Peter Benchley (the author of Jaws). Now before you start thinking this is a Jaws 2, this is a non-fiction work in which Benchley dispels many of the myths of sharks and other denizens of the deep

It was written in 2002, after the ďSummer of the Shark AttacksĒ and is more of an argument against all of the shark hype. A chapter called "The Summer of Hype" sets the record straight on the 2001 media hysteria. The book discusses the real dangers of swimming in the ocean (e.g., tides, rips, and other currents) and how to avoid getting caught, as well as what signs to look for to avoid confrontations with sharks and other potentially dangerous sea creatures.

Now, back to your question - Basic rules to follow to avoid encounters with sharks include:
1) Donít swim in areas frequented by sharks, at least not during the season that they are there.
2) Donít swim through schools of bait fish, you can often spot these by a flock of sea birds flying overhead, diving for fish.
3) Doní swim near boats that are chumming/fishing for sharks
4) Try to avoid swimming at dawn and dusk, this is when many sharks typically feed
5) Donít wear shiny jewelry when you swim, many fish (including sharks and barracuda) are attracted to these.
6) If you see fins donít get in or if you are already in the water donít panic. Many fins belong to dolphins, however sometimes sharks and dolphins swim in close proximity.
7) And back to donít panic Ė if you do see a shark try not to panic (yea right!!) most sharks are more interested in you as a curiosity and not food, however if you madly try to dash away you may aggravate the shark or lead it to believe that you are some odd sort of wounded fish that requires a closer inspection. Itís important to remember that no one can out swim a shark, so let them swim away from you.

And finally, very few people swimming in the ocean ever encounter a shark, even fewer encounter a potentially dangerous one and of those even fewer are actually attached. Statistically more people in the USA are killed by pigs then by sharks and how many of us are deathly afraid of pigs?

laineybug
May 15th, 2003, 03:23 PM
While this may not apply to open water swims it is also good advice for avoiding sharks. I grew up on a barrier island off the coast of Georgia. Sharks would follow the schools of bait fish into shallow water at high tide, then as the tide went out/at low tide the sharks often got caught/ trapped in the water between the beach and sand bar. Be very aware when in water like that.

PS In all the years I lived on St. Simons I never once heard of anyone getting attacked by a shark.

u352
May 15th, 2003, 04:50 PM
No need to apologize. i guess I failed to say that it was a good article up until that point.

eliana2003
May 16th, 2003, 06:32 AM
Originally posted by Rob Copeland
Leonard had some great points. And just a few more thoughts.

For anyone with a fear of whatís in the water, I would recommend reading Shark Trouble: True Stories About Sharks and the Sea -- by Peter Benchley (the author of Jaws). Now before you start thinking this is a Jaws 2, this is a non-fiction work in which Benchley dispels many of the myths of sharks and other denizens of the deep


Many thanks to everyone for the shark advice- I live off of S. Florida so it is an issue (I've actually seen one swim off-shore), but I am aware that 1. most species of sharks do not maul people, 2. and statistically speaking, I have a far greater chance of (g-d forbid) getting hurt in a car accident, et. c., and 3. that I should be more concerned about man o'wars.

BTW-
Statistically more people in the USA are killed by pigs than by sharks

I didn't know pigs could swim...

:D

hawkise
May 16th, 2003, 06:43 AM
Your assumption is correct. Pigs are not the best of swimmers however they can fly.

aquaticweed
May 29th, 2003, 04:58 PM
I'm getting ready for an open water event myself after a long, 6 year, layoff from swimming. A fun practice I got from Michael Collins' workout book that helps you prepare you for drafting works like this.

Swim 1400 yards. Each swimmer takes off two to three seconds after the swimmer before and drafts from the swimmer in front (that means occasionally tickling toes). With two swimmers in a lane, swimmers switch positions every 150 yards; with three or more swimmers in a lane, the first swimmer takes the last swimmer position every 100 yards. Makes those 1400 yards go pretty fast.

Have fun! (Or as my daughter would say, "I'll miss you daddy. I hope you don't drown.")