PDA

View Full Version : Who is the best athlete you ever swam with?



elise526
November 27th, 2008, 11:21 PM
Thought it would be neat to share our stories about the best athlete we ever swam with. Note that it is not necessarily the fastest or best swimmer we have trained with.

The best athlete I ever trained with was a young man that showed up for my masters swim group. He was training to pass the test to be a Navy SEAL officer. Having graduated from a non-Naval Academy college, the standards for making the officers cut were tough. He was, however, a good prospect.

With no prior competitive swim background, he was able to get his 500 yard sidestroke down to a 7:30 in a matter of a few months. However, this was not the main thing that impressed me. It was the times/scores on his practice tests which I helped time him on.

Here is what he could do:

500 yard sidestroke swim: 7:30
8 minute rest
2 minutes of push-ups: # done was 112
2 minute rest
2 minutes of sit-ups: # done was 110
2 minute rest
max number of pull-ups (palms facing away from body): 25
8 minute rest
1.5 mile run done in combat boots and long pants: 9:05.

The guy was a machine. Speed, strength, endurance, and power. Doing 25 pull-ups shortly after a hard swim, pushups, and sit-ups was impressive! The young man decided not to pursue a career in the Navy but chose to stay near family. Last I heard he had started his own business and was doing well.

RobbieD
November 28th, 2008, 02:54 AM
I swam against Neil Walker once at an age group meet in Wisconsin. He was already a big deal in college swimming and I guess he just happened to be in town and decided to go to the meet with his old age group team.

I was the anchor leg for the 200 freestyle relay for my team and he was the anchor for his... I had a big lead but let's just say he went slightly faster than me. I haven't seen someone go that fast in person since then.

swimshark
November 28th, 2008, 06:32 AM
Dave Radcliff for me. Not only his swimming speed but his technique and most of all his attitude in and out of the water. He is someone I admire.

Allen Stark
November 28th, 2008, 11:28 AM
Dave Radcliff for me. Not only his swimming speed but his technique and most of all his attitude in and out of the water. He is someone I admire.

Dave is a great athlete and a great guy.When I was in Houston I swam with Graham Johnson who is also amazing.On the women's side I have swum with Laura Val,and she is frankly unbelievable.Finally I see Don Schollander a couple of times a week at the pool. He is very friendly and down to earth and I have known him for a few years yet I am still in awe of him.

pwb
November 28th, 2008, 01:02 PM
I was fortunate to train with some outstanding swimmers in college. It's really hard to choose, but, for me, the "best swimming athletes" would need to be someone who was great all-around across strokes and distances. The two guys that stand out in my mind are Bill Stapleton ('88 Olympics) and Doug Gjertsen ('88 and '92 Olympics). These guys could compete in practically any event and hold their own with the elite in the country. Their versatility in collegiate dual meets was awesome.

As far as athletes who can do more than swim, the people who impress me are the Ironman triathletes who can hold their own (or beat) experienced & fast swimmers on a 2.4m swim, then proceed to crank out a 112 mile bike and marathon run. I'm always humbled after a Saturday morning swim workout, when I'm feeling pretty proud of myself for having done about 5000 yards ... only to hear the Iron-guys in the locker room talk about the 30 mile "warm-up" ride they did before the swim workout and the 70 mile "training ride" they're about to head off on ... Oh yeah, and that's a light day for them. :bow:

knelson
November 28th, 2008, 01:15 PM
I remember warming up at 1991 Big Tens in Indy and Mike Barrowman was in my lane. I was trying to just do some easy free, but he was doing breast behind me and was right on my feet! I had to speed up, of course. You can't let a breaststroker pass you when you're doing free--even if it is Mike Barrowman :)

tjrpatt
November 28th, 2008, 02:09 PM
I did train with Brendan Hansen for three months in the summer of 1996. He was maybe 15 at the time and I was 19. His brother graduated high school the same year as me.

I didn't really train with her but I had the honor on being at the same club with Grace Cornelius. She was so nice and really down to earth. She was nice to everyone no matter what their social background unlike many of the other upper middle class kids that I used to train with. Plus, for a sprinter, she really trained her tush off.

On a Competition level, I guess that the best athlete that I ever swam against was Atiba Wade. All those guys from PDR were really nice people. I wished that I could have trained there. Of course, he was much faster than me. But, he did go on to swim with a some SEC School and recently swam at this year's Trials.

gobears
November 28th, 2008, 02:28 PM
There are so many great people I swam with over the years. I was always impressed with this girl, Wendy, on my USS team in high-school who didn't have boatloads of natural talent but she worked as hard and had as much fun as anyone else. I was almost more impressed with her because it wasn't like she was reaping a lot of rewards in terms of awards or recognition. She just loved the sport. That is cool.

As far as truly awesome athletes, I trained with Mary T. at Cal (though I was a breaststoker so, as you can imagine, I rarely swam in the same lane). She was really fun and amazing to swim with. Never met a classier swimmer.

My first awesome athlete encounter was when I was at my first National level meet, World Championship Trials, as a sophomore in high-school in 1982. I was in Tracy Caulkins' heat in the 100 breaststroke prelims and totally star-struck.

david.margrave
November 28th, 2008, 02:33 PM
Lunn Lestina on the Curl swim team 85-86.

swam next to Charlie Cline (low 20-second 50 free) at a H.S. meet.

http://www.pvswim.org/records/screagmi.htm

pwb
November 28th, 2008, 03:19 PM
Lunn Lestina on the Curl swim team 85-86.


I remember coming up to PV from Richmond area and getting totally shellacked by Lunn. I was a HS senior and swimming fairly fast, but he was smoking.

osterber
November 28th, 2008, 03:37 PM
Did a workout with Summer Sanders when I was in college. More recently, I paddled around with Rowdy Gaines once. He was doing TV color commentary for a meet I was running.

-Rick

Midas
November 28th, 2008, 03:57 PM
I swim with Laura Val right now. She's in better shape than anybody else on my team. She's an absolute bulldog in practice too. I've swum with some top ten swimmers in my time (no Olympians) but Laura is by far the most impressive.

That Guy
November 28th, 2008, 04:41 PM
When I was a kid I trained with a girl named Beth Scott. I don't think I ever swam in the same lane as her, and I don't think I ever talked to her. She used to walk by me like she didn't even see me. Because she mostly didn't see me. She was legally blind. She won multiple golds and set multiple WR's in the Barcelona Paralympics (B3 classification). You can look it up (http://www.paralympic.org/release/Main_Sections_Menu/Sports/Results/paralympics_events.html?game_id=1992PG&sport_id=20).

Paul Smith
November 28th, 2008, 05:19 PM
Most gifted I've ever trained with or seen; Brian Alderman (high school record holder 100 fly in mid-80's @ 48+, never went to college, top seed 100 fly 88' OT's, hold a couple of masters records)

Hardest working non-distance swimmer; Richard Schroeder (84'/88' Olympian breastroker)

Most badass "D" man would be a tie between Jeff Float & Kirk Anderson from Arden Hill's and USC/Cal respectively.

Best workout swimmer: Jon Clark UCSB in early 80's who could swim/pull close to NCAA QT's but never close in a meet

Carl Spackler
November 28th, 2008, 05:25 PM
I swam against Olympian John Kinsella in college. A very humbling experience. Come to think of it, everyone I swam against in college was a humbling experience. :)

JimRude
November 28th, 2008, 06:07 PM
Having swam at Cal in the mid 1980s, I will let other posters comment on the best swimmer I ever swam with. The list includes but is not limited to:

Bengt Baron
Peter Rocca
Dave Wilson
Pelle Holmertz
Thomas Lejdstrom
Par Arvidsson
Michael Soderlund
Paolo Revelli
Rickie Gill
Adrian Moorhouse
Matt Biondi
John Mykkanen
Sean Killion
Mary T.
Conny van Bentum

My votes:

Most talented - either Biondi, Rickie Gill or Dave Boatwright
Hardest worker - Arvidsson, Lejdstrom, Mykkanen or Killion, though there were lots

BillS
November 28th, 2008, 08:03 PM
+1 on Olympian Radcliff. Great, personable guy out of the pool, and a brutal competitor in the water.

I lined up next to Dave for my first ever LCM 800 last spring. A couple months prior to the 800, I'd had good luck with my first ever SCY 500 pacing off a woman whom I knew to be a seasoned distance swimmer. I just stayed on her hip throughout, then was able to crank it up enough in the last 75 or so to pass her. I figured this strategy would serve me well for the 800, as Dave and I had similar seed times.

It worked like a dream, as Dave and I were basically in lock-step through about 700m, me just back at his hip. I cranked it up some after the 700 wall, and was a little surprised that I was still on his hip -- as opposed to pulling away -- at the 750 turn. No worries, though. "You're going down, old man," thought I at the turn (Dave is 74), and I poured on the coals I had left for the last 50.

At about 775m I realized I had a serious race on my hands, and I gave it all I had. At about 792m I realized I was not going to pass him. And I didn't.

Dave told me later he'd watched my 500 race, and figured I'd try to do the same with him, so he was watching and waiting for my big push at the end.

Great competitor. We still laugh about that race, too. Or at least he does.

mctrusty
November 29th, 2008, 10:22 AM
A friend and I swam with Gustavo Borges over Xmas break one year.

I swim with a lot of good athletes out here in CO. Lots of Ironman ppl, lots of masters top tenners.

Julie Roddin
November 29th, 2008, 01:44 PM
When I was a kid I trained with a girl named Beth Scott. I don't think I ever swam in the same lane as her, and I don't think I ever talked to her. She used to walk by me like she didn't even see me. Because she mostly didn't see me. She was legally blind. She won multiple golds and set multiple WR's in the Barcelona Paralympics (B3 classification). You can look it up (http://www.paralympic.org/release/Main_Sections_Menu/Sports/Results/paralympics_events.html?game_id=1992PG&sport_id=20).

As I've been reading through this thread I keep coming back to Beth Scott as the best athlete I have ever swum with.

I swam with Beth at both Good Counsel High School and at RMSC, she's a year older than me. She's an incredible swimmer and great person. I saw her a few times last summer, she doesn't still swim. I remember her being featured in one of the swimming magazines years ago when I was just getting into masters swimming. We were helping out GC swimming last year together and as we drove to and from their meets she told me swimming stories that were just insane! She probably worked harder than anyone at RMSC at the time and it showed in her performances.

pdjang
November 29th, 2008, 07:57 PM
Thought it would be neat to share our stories about the best athlete we ever swam with. Note that it is not necessarily the fastest or best swimmer we have trained with.

The best athlete I ever trained with was a young man that showed up for my masters swim group. He was training to pass the test to be a Navy SEAL officer. Having graduated from a non-Naval Academy college, the standards for making the officers cut were tough. He was, however, a good prospect.

With no prior competitive swim background, he was able to get his 500 yard sidestroke down to a 7:30 in a matter of a few months. However, this was not the main thing that impressed me. It was the times/scores on his practice tests which I helped time him on.

Here is what he could do:

500 yard sidestroke swim: 7:30
8 minute rest
2 minutes of push-ups: # done was 112
2 minute rest
2 minutes of sit-ups: # done was 110
2 minute rest
max number of pull-ups (palms facing away from body): 25
8 minute rest
1.5 mile run done in combat boots and long pants: 9:05.

The guy was a machine. Speed, strength, endurance, and power. Doing 25 pull-ups shortly after a hard swim, pushups, and sit-ups was impressive! The young man decided not to pursue a career in the Navy but chose to stay near family. Last I heard he had started his own business and was doing well.


Hi,
Since everyone else thinks athlete=swimmer, I'll nominate my partner, Kari Bachman, as the best athlete I have ever swum with.

Most swimmers that I know can't run. They don't have much dryland coordination or depth perception (part of being and aquatic animal). There are exceptions as usual, but very few excel in other sports. Shelia Tamornina (sp) is the exception and may be the best swimmer/athlete.

I give credit to the swimmers that others have cited, but from my perspective, swimming is just one sport. To be a really great athlete, you have to demonstrate excellence in more than one sport. And I think that is Elise's point.

We have a little race in New Mexico that happens every March. It's called the Bataan Death March and it celebrates the survivors of the March. Our little race is nothing compared to what the survivors went through on the march and afterwards - nothing!

To begin, the event is a certified 26.2 mile marathon on mostly sandy roads. It starts at 4000 feet and climbs to about 6000 feet. The first 8 miles are flat, then there is the climb to the peak of Mineral Hill (about 10 miles uphill), with a shorter up and down portion to the sandpit. It is 800 meters of ankle deep sand that is uphill. Once you get past the sand pit, its about 7 miles of rolling hills to the finish.

I've done four of them and finished in the light category. I have yet to place, but I'm very proud that I finished.

Why do I nominate my partner, Kari Bachman, as the best athlete I ever swam with?

They have a heavy category for the Bataan Death March. You carry a 35 pound weighted backpack (weighed before and after the finish) plus water and food. If you have every backpacked, you know how your legs, back and shoulders feel after hiking a few miles with a load. Just think of how you would feel after running 26.2?

She has won three women's heavy titles and the amazing thing is that she is only 120 lbs and 5'7". I've seen some pretty tough guys and gals on the course: Rangers, AF Special Ops (Hurlburt),British Commandos and Navy Seals on the course and she has beaten them to the finish. A lot of people start, but not everyone finishes.

Because she hurt her knee, she has started swimming. Not surprisingly, she is a distance swimmer. No age group, no high school, no college swimming experience. In her mid 40's, she has been ranked in the USMS SCM top ten and is only getting stronger.

In my mind, she is the best athlete that I have ever had the honor of swimming with.

Kindly,
Philipp

Blackbeard's Peg
November 29th, 2008, 09:14 PM
Philipp, I'm right there with you on the definition of athlete. Sure, a lot of the aforementioned names are great swimmers (and for the record, Katie Hoff and I shared water once), but I'd challenge everyone to think of someone who can do something well other than swim. Philipp is right on the money.
I can't think of anyone I'd like to praise at the moment.

elise526
November 29th, 2008, 09:32 PM
Phillip and Muppet - You are right in what I was thinking. I swam with a couple of USA teams and had the luck to train with a few who swam in Olympic Trials. I was in awe of these swimmers without a doubt. In terms of athleticism, however, I have never swam with a person that possessed more natural athletic talent than the young man I mentioned.

There are many swimmers who have athletic abilities that set them apart from their peers. For example, they may have an incredible vertical jump, amazing speed in water and on land, the ability to lift an incredible amount of weight, the ability to throw a baseball at lightening speed, perfect balance, or the ability to endure what others can't.

Of the swimmers in the Olympics this past summer, I have read that Jason Lezak is quite the athlete. Apparently he excelled in a number of sports and I have a feeling would likely stand out from his fellow elite swimmers on measurements of strength, explosive power, and speed on land.

It scares me to think how many pull-ups Lezak could probably do.

pmbchill
November 29th, 2008, 09:40 PM
Susie Atwood (Mexico City, Munich) was our coach at Ohio State in the late 70's and I couldn't believe what a natural talent she was throughout her swimming career. We loved how positive she was even though she could dive in and beat most of us at any given time.

ALM
November 29th, 2008, 10:15 PM
...but I'd challenge everyone to think of someone who can do something well other than swim.

One of my teammates, Mike, taught Gale Sayers how to swim. Mike swam for the University of Kansas and back then swimming was a required course - even for swim team members. The first day of class, Mike tried to talk the instructor into letting him "quiz out" since he could obviously swim. The instructor said, "No, I have a special assignment for you. You're going to teach him how to swim," as he pointed toward one of the other students. It was Gale Sayers.

(For you youngsters, Sayers was a star running back at KU, considered by many to be the greatest open field runner in college football history. He went on to play for the Chicago Bears where he set many NFL records. He was also one of the subjects of the movie "Brian's Song". See his Wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gale_Sayers))

Sayers (and Mike) both successfully passed the swim course when Sayers successfully completed his 20-yard swim. According to Mike, football players don't make the best swimmers. Sayers had so much muscle mass that he struggled to stay afloat.

Allen Stark
November 30th, 2008, 01:34 AM
In college I took a WSI class with Rodrigo Barnes.He was a linebacker who later played for the Cowboys.He could swim fairly well,but if he tried to float he literally sank like a rock.Back then I had very little body fat and sank fairly rapidly,but nothing like him.

Chris Stevenson
November 30th, 2008, 05:34 AM
A lot of people I know who swam in college took up triathlons, running or cycling after graduation and they all did very well, some of them extremely well. I know of none who did poorly, assuming they were even somewhat dedicated to their new sport. They were not exceptions. A lifetime of swimming provided them with the conditioning and mental discipline for such sports.

IMO swimming is not unique in this regard, in either direction (good or bad). An athlete who excels at one sport is likely to excel at others. The exception would be an elite-level athlete who is merely average in any other sport...though not necessarily performing at an elite level in other sports, which is probably the point of the original post.

To be sure, some sports favor body types and physiological adaptations that make the person poorly suited for some other sports. I doubt Shaquille O'Neal would make a very good gymnast; that doesn't make him a poor athlete (as an aside, I still smile about the commercial where Shaq was a jockey in a horse race). Some great cyclists -- particularly the climbers -- appear to have the upper body of an underdeveloped 12-year-old. Heck, look at the Kenyan marathoners; could you imagine them on the football field?

And I beg to differ, but running does not require any great coordination, as Philipp implies. We're not talking about basketball, hockey, volleyball or golf here (sports where excellent lifelong runners are just as apt to be klutzy as anyone else).

swimshark
November 30th, 2008, 08:06 AM
Philipp, I'm right there with you on the definition of athlete. Sure, a lot of the aforementioned names are great swimmers (and for the record, Katie Hoff and I shared water once), but I'd challenge everyone to think of someone who can do something well other than swim. Philipp is right on the money.
I can't think of anyone I'd like to praise at the moment.

Philip, what you wrote was so sweet about your sweetie.

Let me add my sister here, Jennifer Engelstad. She just completed her umpteenth Ironman in Lake Placid. She does at least one Ironman a year with a few halfs and short ones every year as well. She has represented the US at World Triathlon Championships twice, coming in 6th in her age group both times (2nd female overall out of the water last time!). She is truly a dynamo! She trains for these long, grueling races while also being a VP of a company and working long hours. She is amazing in my book and I'm honored to be her sister. I only wish we didn't live 800 miles away so we could train together.

I also swam in the same pool as Inge de Bruijn as she was getting ready for the 2004 Olympics. She was amazing to watch. I used to go underwater just to watch her stroke. And yes, she had the fingernails then, too.

Maui Mike
November 30th, 2008, 12:22 PM
Alomost 40 years ago I taught a swimming instructors class for PE majors. At the end of each class session it was not uncommon for some of the students to do take a few tries off the diving boards. But one guy, Arnie, avoided that since he literally couldn't swim 5 feet to save his life . One day, he decides to have a little fun and announces he's going off the one meter board, but not to worry because he's going to jump all the way to the shallow end! This would take a stupendous leap since from the end of the board to safety was well over 30'! I didn't want to discourage him but felt it prudent to wake up the lifeguard. Well Arnie let fly and it was amazing to watch --- he made it with room to spare, accompanied by the thunderous cheers of all who witnessed.
Arnie Robinson never did get very good at swimming, but went on to win two Olympic medals in the long jump, Bronze in '72 and Gold in '76.

elise526
November 30th, 2008, 03:10 PM
I think we all need to decide what makes a great athlete. In my mind, an athlete is someone who has been blessed with unusual coordination, balance, speed, strength, explosive power, and endurance. Those blessed with these attributes are usually going to excel in several sports. Many coaches out there in many sports, swimming included, actually believe that you can measure a person's athletic potential by vertical jump alone.

For example, Cullen Jones has a vertical jump of 36 inches and was a talented basketball player. Thankfully for the United States, he gave it up at some point in high school to focus more on swimming.

I'm not a big believer in the vertical jump because many endurance-oriented athletes don't have a stellar vertical jump. These individuals certainly demonstrate athleticism in completing grueling events in impressive times.

Another athlete I admire is Bruce Gennari. He qualified for Olympic Trials in the 400 free in 1984 and 1988. In the last few years, he has been named USAT Triathlete of the Year and USAT Masters Triathlete of the Year.

A very nice, humble fellow, Bruce shows up for all the local races which makes my male friends cringe as it throws off their rankings. I've seen the guy cuise a 600 yard swim crushing the field and then look like he was out for an easy jog as he did the 5k on the end of the triathlon in 16 minutes. He is getting older now (I believe he is 42) but still going strong.

Chris Stevenson
November 30th, 2008, 03:35 PM
...He is getting older now (I believe he is 42)...

Watch it with the age-related cracks :) ...or I may have to mention your teams' pathetic football performances yesterday...

elise526
November 30th, 2008, 03:57 PM
Watch it with the age-related cracks :) ...or I may have to mention your teams' pathetic football performances yesterday...

Ha! Yes, the team has indeed struggled. Perhaps the humbling experiences will motivate them to be next year what they should have been this year.

I guess I mentioned Bruce's age in the wrong way. I'm actually the same age. Anyway, what I meant to say was that despite his age, he still wins some competitive triathlons overall. That in itself is impressive because let's face it - it sure is easier for a 25 year old to recover from the volume of training it takes to be on top in a triathlon of any distance.

Chris Stevenson
November 30th, 2008, 04:16 PM
Ha! Yes, the team has indeed struggled. Perhaps the humbling experiences will motivate them to be next year what they should have been this year.

I guess I mentioned Bruce's age in the wrong way. I'm actually the same age. Anyway, what I meant to say was that despite his age, he still wins some competitive triathlons overall. That in itself is impressive because let's face it - it sure is easier for a 25 year old to recover from the volume of training it takes to be on top in a triathlon of any distance.

Perhaps "resistance to the effects of aging" can be added to your list of what it takes to be a good athlete. :)

Periodically in the summer I go riding with some triathletes. One guy is in his upper-60s, a podium finisher at Kona. The man is an absolutely amazing cyclist (which is his strongest leg). It is not at all unusual in training for him to drop Kona-qualifiers who are 20 years younger than him. It goes without saying that he can drop me almost at will.

Allen Stark
November 30th, 2008, 07:42 PM
Junior High,High School and College I wasn't good at any sport except swimming(really I wasn't good at anything but BR and my fly was OK.)We had a fitness test my freshman year in college and I did very well-26 pull ups,120 sit ups in 2 min,30" vertical jump-but I was still a klutz out of the water.A funny thing happened in my late 20s and 30s-I started being better than my friends in racquetball,tennis,volleyball,softball,etc.I was still a klutz,but I was such a well conditioned klutz that I could beat them.

DaveS
November 30th, 2008, 10:43 PM
I have had the extreme pleasure of swimming with some amazing swimmers, both as an age grouper at Nashville Aquatic Club and in college at Texas. But none had the effect on me that Tracy Caulkins had. She was perfect in all strokes and distances, her positive attitude was incredible, just being in the pool with her made me a better swimmer. I'll never forget when we were in high school, and we did a set of descending 400 IMs in workout...I think it was 5 or 6. On the last one, she went a 4:15.80 (or something close), which just beat the American Record at that time. Pretty incredible to break an American Record in a workout in mid-season. When I could finally beat her in practice, I thought I was really something!!

jim thornton
December 1st, 2008, 12:00 AM
Dara.

And I beat her, too, when she wasn't looking, on the 11th x 100 LCM warm up out of a set of 12.

She'd been so far ahead of me on the first 10, I think she'd stopped worrying about me making my move. She probably figured if I was going to make a move at all, it would come on the last of the 12.,

Ah, that's where they always make their mistake!

Beware the penultimate rep. That's always where people like me make our move.

On the first length, she moved ahead with effortless grace, flipped at the wall, and passed me going the other way . A couple seconds later, I did my flip and bided my time, letting her get real comfortable-like with the separation between us.

I started picking it up with 20 meters to go, tried to time things so I'd be at an all-out sprint before she even knew I was racing.

Dara was breathing on the other side when I caught up with only 8 feet to go. She still could have beaten me easily, but she lifted her head to start talking to somebody in the adjacent lane, and was letting herself just glide in. Underwater, I watched in triumph as my fingertips out-touched her by a few inches.

She never knew I beat her, and probably still doesn't, and if she were to read this, I suspect she would believe I am making it all up. But I am not! Triumph was mine that day--and probably by a slightly larger margin than her Olympic loss, too.

I should probably mention she'd had knee surgery a couple days before, and the arthroscope holes were wrapped in tight cellophane to keep anything from leaking into the water.

Most people would not consider this much of a victory. But I do. To my developing life list of accomplishments--I was an extra zombie in George Romaro's classic Dawn of the Dead--I can now add a second item.

I beat Dara Torres in swimming. In a head-to-head race, where one of us actually knew it WAS a race, I came in first--not because I am a better swimmer or have more testosterone, though I would hope one of these things is true, but because of my superior race strategy.

Not many people can say they beat Dara Torres. I am one of them.

PS is it possible that the B70 corporation would finally consider sponsoring me? Or maybe Mr. Romaro could write a redux role for me in his next film about ghouls? In nearly 35 years since my last silver screen appearance, I have actually nearly become a zombie--and grow closer to this goal with each passing day.

Doug Adamavich
December 1st, 2008, 12:20 AM
There are two that stand out in my mind, Robert Hauck and Jason Lezak.

In college (St. Olaf) Bobby became one of the assistant coaches after he came back from Olympic Trials in 1988. He just missed the cut but brought back a lot of knowledge. Of course, he was insanely fast in college but was bananas after Trials. Case in point, we have an alumni meet every year at the start of the season, usually in mid-October. Bobby was not swimming too much but decides to enter the 200 back. He jumps in and sets a pool record. If memory serves it was a 1:52... He was one of my coaches the rest of my time in college, great guy all the way around.

Just last week, I had a chance to swim with Jason Lezak when we did a series of swim clinics in AZ. WOW. First of all, the guy is totally cool, he is a great ambassador for swimming and our country. Really down to Earth and friendly, it was a pleasure driving him around. Plus, his knowledge of swimming is vast. He conducted some great clinics and was wonderful with the swimmers. Watching him swim and do drills was something to behold, I am still amazed at his breakouts. Folks, the power he generates and the fluidity of his underwater work is simply stunning, I don't have the words to adequately describe it.

Those are the two that stand out in my mind the most. In both cases it was a pleasure to swim with them and learn. Two great swimmers and wonderful people, a great combination indeed.

Leonard Jansen
December 1st, 2008, 09:36 AM
Dara.

And I beat her, too, when she wasn't looking, on the 11th x 100 LCM warm up out of a set of 12.


Time to rebalance the meds again, Jim.

-LBJ

meldyck
December 2nd, 2008, 11:53 AM
There were two:

Once I trained in the same lane (not just the same pool) with Kosuke Kitijima, as a result of knowing his coach pretty well. My game was to see if I could get in his way but I lost big time.

The other was Rex Chapman, a former age-group swimmer and not-half-bad basketball player in his spare time.

jim thornton
December 2nd, 2008, 09:26 PM
Mel, just went to your site and looked at the article you did on performance suits and masters swimming times. Interesting piece. Have you modified your thinking much since the LSR and B70 have been released?

meldyck
December 3rd, 2008, 07:56 AM
Mel, just went to your site and looked at the article you did on performance suits and masters swimming times. Interesting piece. Have you modified your thinking much since the LSR and B70 have been released?

Not really in any systematic way, Jim. At the time I wrote that piece, I had access to suits from Speedo at no cost, so doing the tests was easy with the master's group that I coached. I no longer have the good contact and haven't thought about repeating the experiment with the new suits. So, I don't have any new data but I'm a real sucker for anecdotal information from my swimmer friends. If I go to LC Nats next summer I'll probably buy a B70 for that.