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hemlock
November 30th, 2008, 11:15 AM
I have been getting a sore lower back following my swimming workouts. I am sure that it has to do with my technique. I am not that buoyant and I think that the back pain is a result of my lower body sinking while I am swimming. Would a pull buoy help elevate my lower body while swimming?

Blackbeard's Peg
November 30th, 2008, 02:39 PM
yes it will.
so will kicking.

ViveBene
November 30th, 2008, 09:17 PM
I have been getting a sore lower back following my swimming workouts. I am sure that it has to do with my technique. I am not that buoyant and I think that the back pain is a result of my lower body sinking while I am swimming. Would a pull buoy help elevate my lower body while swimming?

Body balance and position should help prevent sore lower back. Sounds as if you have the head up too high. Sinking of lower body does not, in itself, suggest to me a subsequent sore back; rather, an arched back under tension could do it. With a pull buoy, let the head sink down; feel the whole torso buoyant on the water. Do you stretch before swimming and at different points during the workout? That could help.

That said, everyone's back problem is unique. Try what seems to be common sense, try different things.

Good luck!

VB

jim thornton
December 1st, 2008, 12:08 AM
I get sore backs from swimming, especially in the winter when the cold weather seems to increase the spasming crankiness of the lower back muscles.

Kicking, particularly fly, is hard on my back.

Sprinting freestyle and fly are also quite hard on it.

If you have access to Nautilus equipment, there are three machines that are good at stabilizing the back--the crunch machine, the back machine, and the core rotation machine for those diagonal muscles--sorry, drawing a blank on the name. Obliques! Yes, I think that's what they are called. Anyhow, if you strength train these three areas, it can help--just don't overdo it.

My identical twin brother jogs instead of swims and he almost never has back pain. You'd think the jostling and pounding would hurt your back, but he is convinced it tightens up and strengthens stabilizing muscles that keep the back supported. I play a lot of tennis in the summers, and this sometimes helps my back, though it also can lead to weird imbalanced injuries, too.

ViveBene
December 1st, 2008, 05:48 AM
Totally with you on fly worries. In addition to using workout equipment for strengthening back and core, some basic yoga positions, the kind you can do at home or anywhere, are also good. I often do them in the mornings of hard physical work days (should do them daily...).


I get sore backs from swimming, especially in the winter when the cold weather seems to increase the spasming crankiness of the lower back muscles.

Kicking, particularly fly, is hard on my back.

Sprinting freestyle and fly are also quite hard on it.

If you have access to Nautilus equipment, there are three machines that are good at stabilizing the back--the crunch machine, the back machine, and the core rotation machine for those diagonal muscles--sorry, drawing a blank on the name. Obliques! Yes, I think that's what they are called. Anyhow, if you strength train these three areas, it can help--just don't overdo it.

My identical twin brother jogs instead of swims and he almost never has back pain. You'd think the jostling and pounding would hurt your back, but he is convinced it tightens up and strengthens stabilizing muscles that keep the back supported. I play a lot of tennis in the summers, and this sometimes helps my back, though it also can lead to weird imbalanced injuries, too.

Typhoons Coach
December 1st, 2008, 10:13 AM
I have been getting a sore lower back following my swimming workouts. I am sure that it has to do with my technique. I am not that buoyant and I think that the back pain is a result of my lower body sinking while I am swimming. Would a pull buoy help elevate my lower body while swimming?


It sounds to me, as others have mentioned, that your head position is the problem and not necessarily the feet position. As VB mentioned, as well, back injuries are unique to the individual. If you kick more efficiently you will increase your streamline/prone position which will relieve some stress on your lower back and neck. If you are a non-kicker then you can use a pull buoy and paddles to pull more fficiently and therefore making your body more streamline and reducing the stress on the back. Hope this helps.

Ripple
December 1st, 2008, 10:14 AM
I have been getting a sore lower back following my swimming workouts. I am sure that it has to do with my technique. I am not that buoyant and I think that the back pain is a result of my lower body sinking while I am swimming. Would a pull buoy help elevate my lower body while swimming?
A pull buoy might help, but then eventually you have to swim without it. Make sure your head and neck are relaxed and neutral on your spine (you'll be looking down at the bottom of the pool). It also helps if you don't stroke your lead arm until the recovering arm is past the shoulders, as the weight of the recovering arm can counterbalance your legs. Also try pushing your chest down ever so slightly - your lungs are full of air and will cause your upper body to bob up, which of course pushes your legs down.

...My identical twin brother jogs instead of swims and he almost never has back pain. You'd think the jostling and pounding would hurt your back, but he is convinced it tightens up and strengthens stabilizing muscles that keep the back supported. I play a lot of tennis in the summers, and this sometimes helps my back, though it also can lead to weird imbalanced injuries, too.
That's interesting. When I was a fit, lean young runner, 20 or more years ago, I had all kinds of back problems. Sciatic pain burning down the backs of my legs, back going into spasm several times a year. Now that I'm a fat old swimmer, probably nowhere near as fit, I only get the odd bought of upper back soreness after a hectic week at work.