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nhc
December 4th, 2008, 12:58 AM
For emergency situations, it's necessary to be able to swim with your regular clothes on. It must be much harder. Is open water the only place where this can be trained?

Typhoons Coach
December 4th, 2008, 09:10 AM
For emergency situations, it's necessary to be able to swim with your regular clothes on. It must be much harder. Is open water the only place where this can be trained?

No, most pools will allow you to do this if you "rent" a couple of lanes or you can try to collaborate with them and run an emergency action class. Just an idea.

2fish&1whale
December 4th, 2008, 10:59 AM
Come to my Y pool.
They let people in the water with street clothing like shorts, T-shirts and once I even saw a guy with jeans.

PArob83
December 4th, 2008, 12:20 PM
If its during the summer, some outdoor pool will allow it especially if they have a boy scout swimming program, Because that is part of the boyscout program, having to swim with the clothing and use them as a flotation device (clothes inflation)... its allot of fun actually. (once you know how)

Dolphin 2
December 4th, 2008, 12:23 PM
Come to my Y pool.
They let people in the water with street clothing like shorts, T-shirts and once I even saw a guy with jeans.

Hey 2fish&1whale;162258
It's already being done with the Tech Suit craze.

Except for having shoes on, a tech suit is the moral equivalent of swimming fully clothed.

Dolphin 2

PArob83
December 4th, 2008, 12:26 PM
when i was about 7, or 8... my swim coach dove in in a full suit tie and dress pants.

2fish&1whale
December 4th, 2008, 12:42 PM
Hey 2fish&1whale;162258
It's already being done with the Tech Suit craze.

Except for having shoes on, a tech suit is the moral equivalent of swimming fully clothed.

Dolphin 2
I would prefer a tech suit any day over some of the clothing that is being worn into the water. I don't have an issue so much about what type but the fact that these clothes are not made for swimming or even going into the water. Full length denim jeans? Really?

aquageek
December 4th, 2008, 01:34 PM
Hey 2fish&1whale;162258
It's already being done with the Tech Suit craze.


I guess since you were totally proven a fool on the other thread you've come to this one to continue your uneducated rant. What do you mean by tech suit craze? It's been going on since at least 1988 making it neither new nor a craze.

Do you honestly know a single thing about competitive swimming at all?

I remember having to swim in jeans and a sweatshirt and then inflating your jeans to make an ad-hoc life vest for WSI back in the 1980s.

geochuck
December 4th, 2008, 01:48 PM
What great things we can do with clothing. You can take the jeans off and by tying the ends of each leg you can have a great floating device. Most lifesaving courses teach the technique in swim pools.

First thing a person learns is get the shoes off. It is plain to see some people have really gone off your topic.

chaos
December 4th, 2008, 02:11 PM
enter grimaldo's mile hosted by www.cibbows.org they have a costume catagory for their annual mile swim at coney island.

knelson
December 4th, 2008, 02:19 PM
First thing a person learns is get the shoes off.

You're right about that and I'm wondering if this is really a good idea. Most shoes float, don't they? Why would you remove the one piece of clothing that actually provides buoyancy, especially in cold water?

geochuck
December 4th, 2008, 02:25 PM
Life saving 101.


You're right about that and I'm wondering if this is really a good idea. Most shoes float, don't they? Why would you remove the one piece of clothing that actually provides buoyancy, especially in cold water?

Ripple
December 4th, 2008, 02:26 PM
I once went to the Sunday morning "women only" swim at the YWCA and saw a lot of women (presumably Muslim) swimming with long sweatpants and tee shirts on over top of swimsuits. Seems like a lot of wet cotton to drag around, but I suppose it could be good training for boating accidents.

knelson
December 4th, 2008, 02:32 PM
Life saving 101.

The question isn't where they teach this. I know they have always (or at least when I took the classes) told you to ditch the shoes. I just don't think it's sound logic anymore. Maybe back in the day fewer people wore shoes that floated, but now lots of people wear shoes with rubber soles.

2fish&1whale
December 4th, 2008, 03:09 PM
It's not so much about shoes floating but more about the shoes filling with water and weighing you down.
If you trow a pair of shoes in the pool they will probably float briefly, until they are either soaked with water(like sneakers) or filled with water.

knelson
December 4th, 2008, 03:24 PM
Maybe if you're wearing heavy boots, but how much water is a close fitting shoe really going to fill with? My gut feeling is you should keep your shoes on if the water is below 70 degrees unless they really seem to be pulling you down.

Dolphin 2
December 4th, 2008, 04:46 PM
I guess since you were totally proven a fool on the other thread you've come to this one to continue your uneducated rant. What do you mean by tech suit craze? It's been going on since at least 1988 making it neither new nor a craze.

Do you honestly know a single thing about competitive swimming at all?

I remember having to swim in jeans and a sweatshirt and then inflating your jeans to make an ad-hoc life vest for WSI back in the 1980s.

Hey Aquageek
Smoking pot has been going on for over 40 years now -and it's still considered a craze.

By the way since you are so intent about condemning me for my purported lack of knowledge about competitive swimming, what is so "competitive" about using a tech suit?

Anyone can go out and buy one, put it on, and swim in it. It doesn't take any extraordinary athletic skill to do that. :blah:

Dolphin 2

SwimStud
December 4th, 2008, 04:49 PM
By the way since you are so intent about condemning me for my purported lack of knowledge about competitive swimming, what is so "competitive" about using a tech suit?

Anyone can go out and buy one, put it on, and swim in it. It doesn't take any extraordinary athletic skill to do that. :blah:

Dolphin 2


I dunno, those suits are pretty tight!

thewookiee
December 4th, 2008, 04:57 PM
Anyone can go out and buy one, put it on, and swim in it. It doesn't take any extraordinary athletic skill to do that. :blah:

[B]Dolphin 2

No..but it does take skill to know how to swim correctly and not thrash around....there is a difference.

SLOmmafan
December 4th, 2008, 06:15 PM
I had a swim coach that would run practices with full clothes - generally shorts and a t-shirt, but if he was feeling like being a bit hard with jeans. We participated in the AAU Junior Olympic games (in Iowa that year) and he even made us warm up one morning full clothes at the meet for not making a "lights out" at the hotel the previous night.

I think at least a few of the other teams got kinda intimidated, though I am certain we looked rediculous.

nhc
December 5th, 2008, 09:50 AM
Just T-shirts and shorts may not be too much of challenge. That is for when you are jumping in the water to rescue someone, so you may have the few seconds to take off your outerwear and maybe shoes. What if you accidentally fall into a river with bulky winter coat on? Anyone practiced that?:drown: