PDA

View Full Version : Rip Esselstyn's New Book: The Engine 2 Diet



ande
February 18th, 2009, 02:50 PM
My buddy Rip Esselstyn, holds the USMS SCY 45 - 49 Men's American Record in the 200 back with 1:56.55 wrote the:

The Engine 2 Diet:
The Texas Firefighter's 28-Day Save-Your-Life Plan that Lowers Cholesterol and Burns Away the Pounds (http://tinyurl.com/engine2)

People who've stuck with the diet in Rip's 28 day test programs had great results lowering their cholesterol. http://www.theengine2diet.com/28-day-results/

Film (http://www.theengine2diet.com/the-film/)

“This terrific book will inspire all who read it to change their lives and optimize their health.”
Lance Armstrong

“The Engine 2 Diet can save your life — whether you’re a man or a woman.”
Dean Ornish, M.D.

“This book is a clearly written, concise prescription for regaining lost health, vitality, and appearance.”
John McDougall, M.D.

“This book makes healthful eating and exercise fun and doable.”
Joel Fuhrman, M.D., author, Eat for Health and Eat to Live

“This is the ultimate guide to health and long life.”
Neal D. Barnard, M.D., Dr. Neal Barnard's Program for Reversing Diabetes

“The Engine 2 Diet will go far to help extinguish the flames of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes.”
Jeff Novick

“This easily readable book presents an optimal diet as being accessible, simple and delicious.”
Pamela A. Popper, Ph.D., N.D.

“An effective, easy-to-follow, satisfying eating plan for even the manliest of men.”
Rory Freedman, coauthor of Skinny Bitch

3strokes
February 18th, 2009, 03:29 PM
Ande

Please do NOT put the word "RIP" in any header. I got a bad vibe when I first saw it and then realized it was a First(or Nick)Name.

Cheers

ande
February 19th, 2009, 10:47 AM
sorry about that BUT Rip is his name not R.I.P.
he's supposed to be on the Today Show soon


Ande

Please do NOT put the word "RIP" in any header. I got a bad vibe when I first saw it and then realized it was a First(or Nick)Name.

Cheers

Jazz Hands
February 19th, 2009, 11:42 AM
The website doesn't give specifics on what restrictions are actually involved in the diet, but it does contain this mindblowingly stupid section.




Not only will you get all the protein you need, for the first time in your life you won't suffer from an excess of it.

Ample amounts of protein are thriving in whole, natural plant-based foods. For example, spinach is 51 percent protein; mushrooms, 35 percent; beans, 26 percent; oatmeal, 16 percent; whole wheat pasta, 15 percent; corn, 12 percent; and potatoes, 11 percent.

What's more, our body needs less protein than you may think. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the average 150-pound male requires only 22.5 grams of protein daily based on a 2,000 calorie a day diet, which means about 4.5 percent of calories should come from protein. (WHO recommends pregnant women get 6 percent of calories from protein.) Other nutritional organizations recommend as little as 2.5 percent of daily calories come from protein while the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board's recommended daily allowance is 6 percent after a built-in safety margin; most Americans, however, are taking in 20 percent or more.

Doctors from my father to Dean Ornish to Joel Fuhrman, author of the best selling Eat to Live: The Revolutionary Formula for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss (Little, Brown), all suggest that getting an adequate amount of protein should be the least of your worries.

Look around you and tell me the last time you saw someone who was hospitalized for a protein deficiency. Or look around in nature, where you will notice that the largest and strongest animals, such as elephants, gorillas, hippos, and bison, are all plant eaters.

Also, the type of protein you consume is as important as the amount. If you are taking in most of your protein from animal-based foods, you're getting not only too much protein, but also an acid-producing form that wreaks havoc on your system.

Why is protein so potentially harmful? Because your body can store carbohydrates and fats, but not protein. So if the protein content of your diet exceeds the amount you need, not only will your liver and kidneys become overburdened, but you will start leaching calcium from your bones to neutralize the excess animal protein that becomes acidic in the human body.

That's why, in the case of protein, the adage "less is more" definitely applies. The average American consumes well over 100 grams daily—a dangerous amount. But if you eat a plant-strong diet, you'll be getting neither too much nor too little protein, but an amount that's just right.

The protein numbers cited there are either 1. arbitrary numbers with no empirical basis, or 2. numbers based on human survival needs, which are obviously way different from the needs for optimal health and body composition. Every single study that compares a low-protein (under 20% calories) weight loss diet to a high- or moderate-protein weight loss diet shows better results for higher protein, especially in the retention of muscle mass, which is essential for athletes. And 100 grams of protein is not dangerous for the general population. There is absolutely no evidence for that. It's a myth.

Chris Stevenson
February 19th, 2009, 12:11 PM
Every single study that compares a low-protein (under 20% calories) weight loss diet to a high- or moderate-protein weight loss diet shows better results for higher protein, especially in the retention of muscle mass, which is essential for athletes.

I'm not going to defend Esselstyn's approach b/c I don't know anything about it. But I would be wary on how these studies define "success." For masters swimmers, I imagine the definition might be "weight loss without athletic performance loss" during the dieting phase. And high-protein diets might not do so well in that regard.

The problem I have with high-protein weight loss programs is that they are necessarily usually also low-carb diets as well. Maybe this is fine for people who are more sedentary (or possibly even body-builders :)), but I found it to be a terrible idea for endurance athletes. Even masters swimmers who "only" do 15k a week need more carbs than is typically allowed in such diets.

To be fair, I think failing to consider the needs of athletes is pretty common across almost all dietary programs. They are largely designed for a more sedentary population and are often not flexible enough to compensate for pretty active people. I remember once reading through some Weight Watchers material that basically defined "intense exercise" as anything where you break a sweat. The guideline for cycling, for example, was 15mph or higher for a flat ride, which is ridiculously slow.

I once tried a high-protein diet when I wasn't lifting at all, but swimming about 15,000 yards and cycling 150-200 miles per week. After only a single weekend on the diet, both my swimming and cycling noticably declined in speed. By the end of one week, performance was down 10-20% at least. In swimming it felt like I was completely broken down, and on bike rides my legs felt done after the first hard hill. Muscle glycogen just wasn't being replenished between workouts. Retaining muscle mass isn't very useful if the muscles don't have a ready supply of fuel.

That isn't to say a high-protein, or any other, diet couldn't be altered to match the needs of serious athletes -- in the WW approach (which isn't high-protein) it is fairly easy to do so -- just that they often aren't. Caveat emptor.

Jazz Hands
February 19th, 2009, 12:21 PM
Chris, I think you're absolutely right. My hunch is that each of the three macronutrients needs to be abundant in the diet or else something will go wrong. If carbs are too low, energy drops off. If fats are too low, diet compliance suffers big time. If protein is too low, muscle loss tends to occur.

I don't claim to know what the perfect diet is, but it may be different depending on whether you want to lose weight, gain weight, or neither. Effects on insulin and cholesterol are related to weight loss but not always. Some rules stand out for healthy eating, though:

Eat a lot of soluble fiber
Don't eat a lot of refined grain and added sugar
Eat enough protein

Do people really need to buy a book for this?

Jazz Hands
February 19th, 2009, 12:29 PM
Something else that Chris's post brings to mind is the limited scope of most diet studies. Usually they are weight loss trials on obese people. There's not a lot of research on diet as it concerns athletes, or people trying to get to very low body fat (like me). So I have to read the research, extrapolate with a grain of salt, take advice from friends, and pay attention to my own experience.

quicksilver
February 19th, 2009, 12:31 PM
Oddly enough many adults are wreckless in what they eat and how much they consume.
If he can take a group of young men and teach them how to eat healthy, he's doing a lot of good.

The guy with the 300 plus cholesterol reading was so heading down the wrong road.

ande
February 21st, 2009, 07:20 PM
Heard that this Monday, around 8 am CST Rip will be on the Today Show talking about his book Engine 2 (http://tinyurl.com/engine2)
that's KXAN in Austin time warner cable 4 or 1521 HD
my DVR is set

mattson
February 21st, 2009, 10:45 PM
sorry about that BUT Rip is his name not R.I.P.
he's supposed to be on the Today Show soon

I parsed it as a verb: some record holder was ripping into this book.

ande
February 23rd, 2009, 11:11 AM
Rip was on the Today show at 8:44 CST
here's the footage (http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/26184891/vp/29347738#29347738)

***For those of you in Austin,

February 26th at 9:15am
Rip will be holding a press conference on Thursday, in the Atrium in City Hall with Austin's new fire chief and some city council members. We are hoping Mayor Will Wynn will be there. A plant-bountiful breakfast will be served!

Saturday, February 28th at 3:00pm
Rip will be doing a talk and book signing at Book People

ande
April 27th, 2009, 12:53 PM
Just a note that today Mon April 27th, 2009 Rip's book
The Engine 2 Diet: The Texas Firefighter's 28-Day Save-Your-Life Plan that Lowers Cholesterol and Burns Away the Pounds (http://tinyurl.com/engine2)
was ranked 6th on Amazon today think it was 3rd yesterday
not bad for a USMS swimmer

Amazon.com Sales Rank: #6 in Books (See Bestsellers in Books)

Popular in these categories: (What's this?)

#1 in Books > Health, Mind & Body > Diets & Weight Loss > Diets

#1 in Books > Health, Mind & Body > Nutrition

#1 in Books > Health, Mind & Body > Diets & Weight Loss > Special Conditions > Low Cholesterol

letsrace
April 27th, 2009, 02:08 PM
Ande,

Thanks for turning us on to Rip's book. My wife started us on the diet about 6 weeks ago, and I am very happy that she did. I can't say that I am religiously following his plan, but I do think about it each time I make meal choices.

To Jazz's point, do we need another book for this? One could argue, "no", but the simple exercise of sitting in an airport and people-watching is enough to make me answer "yes". People (all of us) need to be reminded that the stuff we eat effects our body. Is that obvious? Of course, but it doesn't stop me from eating ice cream nearly every night. Perhaps another book will.

Chris, I wouldn't read this as another "high protein" diet. It is more of a whole foods diet. Having known many who have religiously followed Atkins-like diets, I think Rip is pointing to a much more prudent diet whose primary goal is good heart health and happens to help people lose weight (yes, I know that Atkins claimed to be good for the heart). Are Rip's studies robust? No. They are a homogeneous group of people, clearly, and the sample size is small. But I thought the numbers presented were convincing enough to argue for trying a dietary solution for lowering cholesterol over a doctor-prescribed solution.

mctrusty
April 27th, 2009, 02:11 PM
Ande,
Have you been working with Rip's diet? If so, how's working for you?

I married a vegetarian 2 years ago and have lost about 20 pounds since then :).

Chris Stevenson
April 27th, 2009, 02:45 PM
My wife convinced me to enroll us in a CSA (http://www.localharvest.org/csa/), and the produce starts rolling in next week. Maybe this book is a way to avoid A LOT of veggies rotting in the fridge... :)

letsrace
April 27th, 2009, 08:11 PM
I am glad you posted that link. I started looking for a CSA in my area about two years ago in an effort to spend my tax rebate locally in an effective manner. I didn't find one (I must not have been googling effectively). Now, I have several. Thanks, Chris.

JMiller
April 27th, 2009, 08:20 PM
I am glad you posted that link. I started looking for a CSA in my area about two years ago in an effort to spend my tax rebate locally in an effective manner. I didn't find one (I must not have been googling effectively). Now, I have several. Thanks, Chris.

See what happens when good people decide to share ideas? Find X, the unknown, faster!

:bliss:

Chris Stevenson
April 27th, 2009, 09:46 PM
I am glad you posted that link. I started looking for a CSA in my area about two years ago in an effort to spend my tax rebate locally in an effective manner. I didn't find one (I must not have been googling effectively). Now, I have several. Thanks, Chris.

No problem, I hope you enjoy. My wife and I have found some pretty funny stories of others who have bought into CSAs ("101 ways to prepare Kale" and the like). We're ready!

And great job at the meet, by the way.

ande
April 28th, 2009, 11:27 AM
Hey Mike,

You're welcome, hope it helps you swim faster faster, though you're swimming plenty fast. I haven't embraced it fully, but I am eating more veggies and less meat.

Ande


Ande,

Thanks for turning us on to Rip's book. My wife started us on the diet about 6 weeks ago, and I am very happy that she did. I can't say that I am religiously following his plan, but I do think about it each time I make meal choices.