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mazzy
February 20th, 2009, 08:35 AM
The Swimming World magazine have posted this article, http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/lane9/news/20390.asp?q=Swimsuit%20Manufacturers%20Come%20to%2 0an%20Understanding%20at%20Meeting%20Before%20FINA %20Meeting%20Tomorrow



LAUSANNE, Switzerland, February 19. IN an attempt to have a united front on what possible changes they are willing to have enacted with regard to speedsuits, suit manufacturers got together for a meeting today in Switzerland, according to Tony Austin of the SCAQ Blog.

Without working together, there was a definite possibility that the powers working against speedsuits continuing in the sport altogether could have capitalized on a split agenda by the various competing manufacturers.

According to Austin's reporting, the manufacturers have agreed to a game plan heading into tomorrow's meeting. The restrictions they are willing to agree to immediately without any fight are "a de facto buoyancy test, suit thickness guidelines, a rule to ban multiple suits and/or duct tape ‘mods' and most importantly clear cut rules so that suit innovation can take place without the fear of a nebulous interpretation wiping out bundles of money in R&D expenses at the last minute."





Tomorrow, the official recommendation that will be put in front of the FINA congress will be hammered out.

Full text of the blog posting (http://scaq.blogspot.com/2009/02/speedsuits-informal-fina-speedsuit.html).


Look like a compromise will be the probable outcome from this mess about Tech-suits.
The Manufactures are in too strong positions to accept a complete ban at top level, too much money is on the stake, so they're showing all together to force the hand to FINA with a common position, with minor changes.
All the swimming's world needed money from major sponsors, and The tech suits are a great source of profit.
The overall performance are improved too much in a blink at every level to even think that the suit don't affect the performance in pool, and if they affect the performance by rule they'd be banned period.
But for me it's too late and too much to loose for nearly everybody to return to speedoo.
It's ironic that multiple suits are accepted to be banned because help the swimmers, but if multiple suits helps then every single suit must help at little bit, even one alone only, otherwise it's a nosense in first place. So why banned multiple suite if the suit don't help buoyance ?

The Fortress
February 20th, 2009, 10:15 AM
What's a "duct tape mod"?

It would be interesting to hear what FINA's leanings/goals for the meeting are ... You wouldn't think they'd want to ban suits they'd already approved. I'm sure FINA will issue some guidelines/restrictions on suit approval processes, suit thickness, multiple suits etc. But will they actually ban existing suits or chop them off at the knees?

What position is USA Swimming taking? I'm wondering if it's supporting a total roll back ...

I'm rooting for Roque!

ande
February 20th, 2009, 10:33 AM
Leslie,

He's referring to this article
Device Testing is Next Big Controversy in Competitive Swimming (http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/lane9/news/20388.asp)

-- February 19, 2009

Swimmers are using duct tape as a device on their skin to bind muscle groups together.
PHOENIX, Arizona, February 19.

WITH the major swimsuit players and manufacturers assembling in Lausanne, Switzerland today and tomorrow to discuss standards for swimsuit technology, a new controversy is looming over the waters.

In the March issue of Swimming World Magazine, publisher Brent Rutemiller reveals what some athletes are doing under their suits to enhance their performances. Here is an excerpt of what Rutemiller reports:

Early reports indicate a growing trend in which swimmers are using duct tape as a device on their skin to bind muscle groups together. They are trying to get the same effect as a $500 high-performance suit that promotes core body stability. Since swimmers will be limited to only one racing suit during a competition, they are already coming up with their own devices to keep that competitive edge.

Some female athletes are using tape as a first-level form of compression to streamline their chests before getting into a racing suit. Both males and females are experimenting by tightly wrapping tape around their core body.

During the 2008 Olympic Games, the benefits of athletic taping made volleyball headlines when a new type of tape, Kinesio Tape, showed up on the shoulders, arms, legs and backs of many high-profile athletes.

In Lance Armstrong's book, "Every Second Counts," he praised the athletic tape that came from Japan as having "magical powers."

Athletes are learning that the tape can be applied in a specific pattern—either stretched or not stretched—depending on the needed outcome. Many claim that the tape method helps relieve pain by lifting the skin to allow the blood to flow more freely to the muscles.

The fact that athletes are now applying those lessons in innovative ways indicates device testing may be the next fight within the governing communities.




What's a "duct tape mod"?

It would be interesting to hear what FINA's leanings/goals for the meeting are ... You wouldn't think they'd want to ban suits they'd already approved. I'm sure FINA will issue some guidelines/restrictions on suit approval processes, suit thickness, multiple suits etc. But will they actually ban existing suits or chop them off at the knees?

What position is USA Swimming taking? I'm wondering if it's supporting a total roll back ...

I'm rooting for Roque!

ourswimmer
February 20th, 2009, 10:37 AM
I know "not below the knees" has figured into several local and regional suit standards for kids' competition, but I sure hope FINA doesn't do that overall. I don't know how ankle-length and knee-length compare on hydrodynamics, but I really hate how the bottom hem of a tight-enough knee-length suit digs into my thigh.

pdjang
February 20th, 2009, 10:38 AM
Believe it or not, some female swimmers are taping their thoracic region with duct tape before putting on a swim suit - to minimize surface area.

Male swimmers are duct taping their abdominal area in an effort to reinforce the core stabilizer muscles.

Taping muscles, ligaments and joints has a long history (e.g., football, basketball). The primary effect is to stabilize excessive motion - however, there is some evidence that compressing muscle reduces percieved fatigue.

I believe that there is a special duct tape that combines the properties of elastic bandages with the compressive properties of duct tape. It appears to be favored by elite volleyball athletes.

I would hazard that one would wish to shave the area of the body that is to be subject to duct tape (prior to application). LOL.

The Fortress
February 20th, 2009, 10:46 AM
Leslie,

He's referring to this article
Device Testing is Next Big Controversy in Competitive Swimming (http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/lane9/news/20388.asp)

-- February 19, 2009

Swimmers are using duct tape as a device on their skin to bind muscle groups together.
PHOENIX, Arizona, February 19.

WITH the major swimsuit players and manufacturers assembling in Lausanne, Switzerland today and tomorrow to discuss standards for swimsuit technology, a new controversy is looming over the waters.

In the March issue of Swimming World Magazine, publisher Brent Rutemiller reveals what some athletes are doing under their suits to enhance their performances. Here is an excerpt of what Rutemiller reports:

Early reports indicate a growing trend in which swimmers are using duct tape as a device on their skin to bind muscle groups together. They are trying to get the same effect as a $500 high-performance suit that promotes core body stability. Since swimmers will be limited to only one racing suit during a competition, they are already coming up with their own devices to keep that competitive edge.

Some female athletes are using tape as a first-level form of compression to streamline their chests before getting into a racing suit. Both males and females are experimenting by tightly wrapping tape around their core body.

During the 2008 Olympic Games, the benefits of athletic taping made volleyball headlines when a new type of tape, Kinesio Tape, showed up on the shoulders, arms, legs and backs of many high-profile athletes.

In Lance Armstrong's book, "Every Second Counts," he praised the athletic tape that came from Japan as having "magical powers."

Athletes are learning that the tape can be applied in a specific pattern—either stretched or not stretched—depending on the needed outcome. Many claim that the tape method helps relieve pain by lifting the skin to allow the blood to flow more freely to the muscles.

The fact that athletes are now applying those lessons in innovative ways indicates device testing may be the next fight within the governing communities.

Kinesio tape is nothing like duct tape though ... I don't see any compression in that. It's used to provide pain relief while swimming?!

I can't believe people are duct taping themselves ... Yeesh.

And I agree with Ourswimmer. I can't stand kneeskins. I see no reason why grown adults should be regulated in this fashion.

mazzy
February 20th, 2009, 10:47 AM
The official press release from FINA:

FINA, represented by its Executive and Technical Swimming Commission, Legal, Coaches and Athletes Commissions’ representatives, held today a meeting in Lausanne (SUI) with representatives of 16 swimwear manufacturers in order to examine amendments of the current ‘FINA Requirements for Swimwear Approval’.

Based on FINA's proposals and contributions discussed at the meeting, the FINA Bureau at its meeting on March 12-14, 2009 in Dubai (UAE) will consider amendments which include:

• DESIGN: The swimsuit shall not cover the neck and shall not extend past the shoulders nor past the ankles;
• MATERIAL:

o The material used shall have a maximum thickness of 1mm;
o When used, the material shall follow the body shape;
o The application of different materials shall not create air trapping effects;
• BUOYANCY: The swimsuit shall not have a buoyancy effect of more than 1 Newton (100gr);
• CONSTRUCTION: Any system providing external stimulation or influence of any form (e.g. pain reduction, chemical/medical substance release, electro-stimulation) is prohibited;
• CUSTOMISATION: All swimsuits of an approved model must be constructed in an identical fashion with no variation/modification for individual swimmers from the samples submitted for approval;
• USE: The swimmer can only wear one swimsuit at a time;
• CONTROL: FINA will establish its own independent control/testing programme. Scientific testing will be conducted by a team led by Prof. Jan-Anders Manson, from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) and Laboratory of Polymer and Composite Technology;
• APPROVAL: Swimwear manufacturers will be able to make submissions for approval of swimsuits until March 31, 2009.

In a further step, rules applicable from January 1, 2010 will also be examined by the Bureau.
One of the main aspects to be considered is the limitation of the use of non-permeable material.

“FINA has studied this matter very carefully, and together with all interested parties and the scientific expertise of EPFL, we have reached the best possible result.

"With these amendments, FINA shows that it continues to monitor the evolution of the sport’s equipment with the main objective of keeping the integrity of sport. While we need to remain open to evolution, the most important factors must be the athletes’ preparation and physical condition on achieving their performances”, considered FINA President Mustapha Larfaoui.

Redbird Alum
February 20th, 2009, 10:54 AM
I don't see any discussion of the "taping" issue, only secondary suits.
Do you suppose this will be addressed separately?

ande
February 20th, 2009, 11:20 AM
Mazzy the sources of that release is:
PR16 - Meeting between FINA and swimwear manufacturers (http://www.fina.org/project/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2126&Itemid=107)

FINA Releases Information About Speedsuit Meeting Held in Switzerland Today
-- February 20, 2009 (http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/lane9/news/20402.asp?q=FINA%20Releases%20Information%20About% 20Speedsuit%20Meeting%20Held%20in%20Switzerland%20 Today)

FINA is proposing what I expected them to:
1 suit per swimmer not too much float
Since it is proposed, doesn't look like it's a rule yet.

Wonder what happens to all the suits swimmers already have?

also doesn't mention the brief beneath for "modesty purposes"

but in addition to DRUG testing looks like we're now going to have DEVICE TESTING
Device Testing is Next Big Controversy in Competitive Swimming -- February 19, 2009 (http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/lane9/news/20388.asp?q=Device%20Testing%20is%20Next%20Big%20C ontroversy%20in%20Competitive%20Swimming)

I'm sure there is going to be new language in rules:

USMS Rule 102.15.9
Swimmers are not permitted to wear or use any device or substance to help their speed, pace, or buoyancy.

USA Swimming Rule 102.10.10:
"No swimmer is permitted to wear or use any device or substance to help his/her speed or buoyancy during a race."

Ande


The official press release from FINA:

FINA, represented by its Executive and Technical Swimming Commission, Legal, Coaches and Athletes Commissions’ representatives, held today a meeting in Lausanne (SUI) with representatives of 16 swimwear manufacturers in order to examine amendments of the current ‘FINA Requirements for Swimwear Approval’.

Based on FINA's proposals and contributions discussed at the meeting, the FINA Bureau at its meeting on March 12 - 14, 2009 in Dubai (UAE) will consider amendments which include:


• DESIGN: The swimsuit shall not cover the neck and shall not extend past the shoulders nor past the ankles;

• MATERIAL:

o The material used shall have a maximum thickness of 1mm;
o When used, the material shall follow the body shape;
o The application of different materials shall not create air trapping effects;

• BUOYANCY: The swimsuit shall not have a buoyancy effect of more than 1 Newton (100gr);

• CONSTRUCTION: Any system providing external stimulation or influence of any form (e.g. pain reduction, chemical/medical substance release, electro-stimulation) is prohibited;

• CUSTOMISATION: All swimsuits of an approved model must be constructed in an identical fashion with no variation/modification for individual swimmers from the samples submitted for approval;

• USE: The swimmer can only wear one swimsuit at a time;

• CONTROL: FINA will establish its own independent control/testing programme. Scientific testing will be conducted by a team led by Prof. Jan-Anders Manson, from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) and Laboratory of Polymer and Composite Technology;

• APPROVAL: Swimwear manufacturers will be able to make submissions for approval of swimsuits until March 31, 2009.


In a further step, rules applicable from January 1, 2010 will also be examined by the Bureau.
One of the main aspects to be considered is the limitation of the use of non-permeable material.

“FINA has studied this matter very carefully, and together with all interested parties and the scientific expertise of EPFL, we have reached the best possible result.

"With these amendments, FINA shows that it continues to monitor the evolution of the sport’s equipment with the main objective of keeping the integrity of sport. While we need to remain open to evolution, the most important factors must be the athletes’ preparation and physical condition on achieving their performances”, considered FINA President Mustapha Larfaoui.

thewookiee
February 20th, 2009, 11:23 AM
FINA is proposing what I expected them to:
1 suit per swimmer not too much float

Since it is proposed, doesn't look like it's a rule yet.

Wonder what happens to all the suits swimmers already have?

Since they didn't address suits already approved, the guidelines may be use on new suits. They left themselves some wiggle room on the suits from 2008 and may let them stay.

Karen Duggan
February 20th, 2009, 12:03 PM
Can we still wear the B70 Nero Comp for Natls? (That's the important thing here :D )!!!

And if this new rule is coming, what will that do these past records, etc? I assume they'll stand b/c they can't very well go back and just "erase" swims, esp if you can't say who wore what suit!

I am not at all surprised about what's happening at the D1 level. I was talking to a very elite swimmer (multiple WR holder) last night at practice and she concurred that the suit makes a dramatic difference, no matter what you're level. She did also say that she thought that the biggest help would be with compression around the core (ie, my big tummy!).

Interesting.

mazzy
February 20th, 2009, 12:08 PM
Since they didn't address suits already approved, the guidelines may be use on new suits. They left themselves some wiggle room on the suits from 2008 and may let them stay.

Well They'll be history at least most of them if next month the bureau will pass the new proposal, simply.
There's no other way, LZR is against the new proposal with the rigid support that force the body to adapt.

The Fortress
February 20th, 2009, 12:15 PM
Well They'll be history at least most of them if next month the bureau will pass the new proposal, simply.
There's no other way, LZR is against the new proposal with the rigid support that force the body to adapt.

Really? I had the impression from reading the recommendation that the new suits might stay and perhaps regulating future evolution?

Karen, I think the new rules are supposed to be implemented this summer? I think the LZR and Pro are supposed to help more with core compression than the B70. That's why the double suiters are wearing them with the B70.

knelson
February 20th, 2009, 12:33 PM
Really? I had the impression from reading the recommendation that the new suits might stay and perhaps regulating future evolution?

That's my take. I don't see anything obvious that makes the current suits such as the LZR and BlueSeventy Nero illegal. Possibly the material thickness, but I don't own any of these suits, so don't know for sure.

Karen Duggan
February 20th, 2009, 02:51 PM
One of my students swims summer rec and I also swim Masters with his dad. I was showing him the article. He asked me about the thickness of the B70. I didn't know the answer. Is it more than 1mm? Clemmons, you there?

BTW, it just struck me, a LZR and a B70 together- that's some cha-ching!

One more thing: I read that article, that I think Ande posted, about the Aussie girl 200 flyer and how she didn't wear a new tech suit at their Oly Trials, and didn't make it in her "sure thing" event. What were her coaches thinking?! She got some horrible advice. And I don't know how old she is, but didn't it occur to her, at all, that if all of these other swimmers are wearing them there must be a reason?!

OK, two more things: It says the suit can't go past the ankle. When I wore a B70 it was below my calf, but above my ankle. Are they talking about banning leg suits? I'm a little confused I guess.

knelson
February 20th, 2009, 03:25 PM
OK, two more things: It says the suit can't go past the ankle. When I wore a B70 it was below my calf, but above my ankle. Are they talking about banning leg suits? I'm a little confused I guess.

Nah, they just want to make it clear that a suit can't cover the foot.

Chris Stevenson
February 20th, 2009, 03:45 PM
I was talking to a very elite swimmer (multiple WR holder) last night at practice and she concurred that the suit makes a dramatic difference, no matter what your level.

Well, it depends on your definition of "dramatic." The numbers posted in another thread about the predicted vs actual results at Olympic Trials suggested a 1% improvement across all women's events. That's roughly 0.6 sec per 100. Certainly pretty significant at the elite level.

Karen Duggan
February 20th, 2009, 03:48 PM
Agreed. :agree:

ande
February 20th, 2009, 04:10 PM
even though Suit Stacking (http://www.usms.org/forums/showpost.php?p=145613&postcount=800) is likely to soon be illegal in meets.

I suggest it might be helpful for swimmers to occasionally stack suits in practice. It may help athletes rehearse racing their events and sprints at race pace or faster.

jim clemmons
February 20th, 2009, 04:59 PM
One of my students swims summer rec and I also swim Masters with his dad. I was showing him the article. He asked me about the thickness of the B70. I didn't know the answer. Is it more than 1mm? Clemmons, you there?


Yes, I'm here, but contrary to what some believe, I don't carry my suit around with me all day like Linus and his blankee. The suit's at home, but I can measure it tonight if Ande doesn't readily have the spec available. 1mm = ~.040" Seems like it'll be close to that in thickness if you include both the neoprene (I believe it's neoprene if I remember correctly) and fabric combined and not just one or the other.




BTW, it just struck me, a LZR and a B70 together- that's some cha-ching!



Just remember :angel: , you can't take it with you so you might as well spend it while you're here on Earth.

Karen Duggan
February 20th, 2009, 05:05 PM
Thanks, Linus! (I know it's under your desk)
:bump:

nkfrench
February 20th, 2009, 06:32 PM
One more thing: I read that article, that I think Ande posted, about the Aussie girl 200 flyer and how she didn't wear a new tech suit at their Oly Trials, and didn't make it in her "sure thing" event.

I believe I read that she is very petite and could not get a suit that fit properly.

Deano
February 21st, 2009, 03:46 AM
One of my students swims summer rec and I also swim Masters with his dad. I was showing him the article. He asked me about the thickness of the B70. I didn't know the answer. Is it more than 1mm? Clemmons, you there?

BTW, it just struck me, a LZR and a B70 together- that's some cha-ching!

One more thing: I read that article, that I think Ande posted, about the Aussie girl 200 flyer and how she didn't wear a new tech suit at their Oly Trials, and didn't make it in her "sure thing" event. What were her coaches thinking?! She got some horrible advice. And I don't know how old she is, but didn't it occur to her, at all, that if all of these other swimmers are wearing them there must be a reason?!

OK, two more things: It says the suit can't go past the ankle. When I wore a B70 it was below my calf, but above my ankle. Are they talking about banning leg suits? I'm a little confused I guess.

Hi all, Back form Switzerland, and thought I would throw an answer or two in for you.

the blueseventy compostie material DRST is not neoprene (just to clarify this for all) and the total thickness of the material is 0.3mm, well below the legal limit proposed of 1.0mm.

Having been a part of the process and been in attendance in Lausanne yesterday I can confirm on behalf of blueseventy that we and the other brands are delighted with the outcome and we now have (Subject to Dubai meeting ratification) a set of rules that we can work to use to define our on going technologies.

Our suit IS Legal, always HAS been legal and WILL continue to be legal. This we are of course not too suprised, as we have always maintained a postion of working within the rules of FINA.

Any questions, then please do drop me a message.


Deano

blueseventy Marketing Director.

pwb
February 21st, 2009, 11:49 AM
Hi all, Back form Switzerland, and thought I would throw an answer or two in for you.

the blueseventy compostie material DRST is not neoprene (just to clarify this for all) and the total thickness of the material is 0.3mm, well below the legal limit proposed of 1.0mm.

Having been a part of the process and been in attendance in Lausanne yesterday I can confirm on behalf of blueseventy that we and the other brands are delighted with the outcome and we now have (Subject to Dubai meeting ratification) a set of rules that we can work to use to define our on going technologies.

Our suit IS Legal, always HAS been legal and WILL continue to be legal. This we are of course not too suprised, as we have always maintained a postion of working within the rules of FINA.

Any questions, then please do drop me a message.


Deano

blueseventy Marketing Director.

Thanks, Dean. Looking forward to continuing to compete in your company's very nice suits. Thanks also for your continued outreach to the USMS community.

Allen Stark
February 21st, 2009, 12:58 PM
Hi all, Back form Switzerland, and thought I would throw an answer or two in for you.

the blueseventy compostie material DRST is not neoprene (just to clarify this for all) and the total thickness of the material is 0.3mm, well below the legal limit proposed of 1.0mm.

Having been a part of the process and been in attendance in Lausanne yesterday I can confirm on behalf of blueseventy that we and the other brands are delighted with the outcome and we now have (Subject to Dubai meeting ratification) a set of rules that we can work to use to define our on going technologies.

Our suit IS Legal, always HAS been legal and WILL continue to be legal. This we are of course not too suprised, as we have always maintained a postion of working within the rules of FINA.

Any questions, then please do drop me a message.


Deano

blueseventy Marketing Director.

I saw that the rules for the Clovis open water swim doesn't allow impermeable suits.how does that affect wearing a B-70?
Also,I think the guideline about"external influence or stimulation"may preclude the duct taping.(While I would ordinarily do anything legal to swim faster,I don't think I'll be duct taping my abdomen any time soon,unless of course Jim Clemmons does.)

hofffam
February 21st, 2009, 01:39 PM
I think neoprene is irrelevent. Neoprene is a dupont brand of synthetic rubber. I think it is silly to say the B70 doesn't use neoprene as if that is some big deal. Too many people think all neoprene is closed cell foam like what is used in wetsuits.

The B70 suit material appears to be "Power Lycra" plus "Yamamoto SCS" fabric. Anyone with this suit (I have one) knows it is essentially lycra coated with a rubber-like material.

You can see the coating is hydrophobic by the way water beads up on it. Water doesn't want to stick to it. Similar to a freshly waxed car.

BTW - I am happy with the outcome of the meeting (so far) - thanks Deano for the report.

Chris Stevenson
February 21st, 2009, 02:25 PM
I saw that the rules for the Clovis open water swim doesn't allow impermeable suits.how does that affect wearing a B-70?

My recollection is that the B70 isn't completely impermeable, some of the panels allow water through.

jim clemmons
February 21st, 2009, 06:53 PM
Also,I think the guideline about"external influence or stimulation"may preclude the duct taping.(While I would ordinarily do anything legal to swim faster,I don't think I'll be duct taping my abdomen any time soon,unless of course Jim Clemmons does.)

No duct tape - promise. It's like enough's enough already. I'm just happy with the suit.

meldyck
February 21st, 2009, 08:36 PM
No duct tape - promise. It's like enough's enough already. I'm just happy with the suit.

I'm thinking about using duct tape on some of my competitors, just to speed them up, of course.....

Karen Duggan
February 21st, 2009, 11:24 PM
I think I should buy some stock in duct tape :D

I just can't over the idea of taking it off after you've swum in it... OUUUUCHHHHHHH.

jim clemmons
February 22nd, 2009, 01:47 PM
BTW - I did measure my B70. I used a set of .001" dial calipers.

Near the ends of the sleeves and bottom of the legs there's some heavy stiching that interfered with getting to the fabric only portion of those areas but it measured ~.039-.045", roughly 1mm +/-.

I took a couple of different portions of the interior and folded it, increasing the thickness by 2. This measurement was .040-.046", divide that by 2 and you get .020-.023", roughly .5mm.

This is probably consistent with Deano's statement of .3mm as my tool availability was limited and there's probably a spec for how much pressure is applied while taking the measurement. I have no way of applying consistent pressure while "squeezing" the calipers.

Long story short, the suit's well under the thickness allowance, IMO. :cheerleader:

Add this to your list of things you too can do on a rainy day. :cool:

pwb
February 22nd, 2009, 02:19 PM
Do we expect USMS to come out with a position different from FINA? Do we anticipate that the March Dubai meeting will result in suit/technology changes imposed at Clovis Nationals?

jim clemmons
February 22nd, 2009, 03:38 PM
Do we expect USMS to come out with a position different from FINA? Do we anticipate that the March Dubai meeting will result in suit/technology changes imposed at Clovis Nationals?

I'd be surprised if any inconsistency develped between FINA and USMS. I would also suspect that the current suits in use would still be allowed come May.

I'd even go so far as to bet Butchers paycheck on it. :D

Glider
February 22nd, 2009, 10:53 PM
Nailed it!


I'd be surprised if any inconsistency develped between FINA and USMS. I would also suspect that the current suits in use would still be allowed come May.

I'd even go so far as to bet Butchers paycheck on it. :D

kahalb
March 17th, 2009, 01:00 PM
The new rules state they start Jan 1, 2010, then USA/USMS swimming needs to review and adopt and typically lags to May of that year...we'll see

http://www.fina.org/project/images/help/the%20dubai%20charter.pdf

I know you were kidding about wearing 2 suits, but that was specifically banned as well....swimmers that wear even a small suit under their skin suit could be DQed.

http://timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=780656

ouch