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qbrain
February 23rd, 2009, 08:38 PM
Usually after a meet I am wiped out. I am looking for suggestions on how to prevent the post meet zombie effect.

jim clemmons
February 23rd, 2009, 09:01 PM
Usually after a meet I am wiped out. I am looking for suggestions on how to prevent the post meet zombie effect.

I think age may have a little to do with it but - IMO - if you're not wiped out to some degree, you didn't swim hard enough.

Drink lots of fluids after the meet and (I) usually plan on swimming relatively easy at the following days workout - if I go.

The Fortress
February 23rd, 2009, 09:25 PM
Usually after a meet I am wiped out. I am looking for suggestions on how to prevent the post meet zombie effect.

I'm always a zombie after a meet too, especially a 2+ day meet. It usually takes me 3-4 days to feel better.

I agree with Jim. Lots of fluids and easy swimming/easy exercising to help flush the lactic acid. Massages help speed recovery too. I usually opt for a massage before a big meet. But once I did it after, and it really helped.

craig68
February 23rd, 2009, 09:40 PM
I agree with the comments and suggestions above. I'd also add this. Don't skimp on your warm-down after your last event. You may be tempted to hit the showers/restaurant/bar/bed/all of the above soon after your last event. But a 20 minute warm-down will flush out all the lactic acid and help you keep from feeling sore the next day. I don't know if there is anything to do to prevent feeling exhausted if you raced hard.......

CreamPuff
February 23rd, 2009, 09:42 PM
LOL - This thread really interests me. I'm never tired after a meet. I typically have great practices right after the meet. I'm starting to think meets are a break from my training. I warm down lots after each swim and I drink a good recovery drink immediately after I'm done for the day.

The only other thing I can add is that I make sure to go to practice the following day. I used to take a day or two off and I found (years back) that I would be very stiff. The college gals I swam with (and their coaches) recommended to get in and swim the next day as that's what they do to prevent soreness, stiffness, etc. First time I heard this I thought they were all insane. But it works for me. . . but I guess I also train significant yardage over what I actually race, warm up and warm down in a meet.

Allen Stark
February 23rd, 2009, 09:48 PM
If it is a mid-season meet I think of the meet as a lactic acid stress workout,so I want to be tired.If it is a taper meet,I'll take it easy for a few days-long slow swimming.

Daaaave
February 23rd, 2009, 09:59 PM
1. 100 yd warmdown
2. 20 min. hot shower
3. Good-natured high-volume locker room discussion with teammates and competitors about all the reasons you didn't go faster in all of your events/how out of shape you were for this meet
4. Start nodding off at the bar after three beers and some bar food
5. Three advil, bed
6. Call in sick to work on Monday
7. Tuesday, good as new.

Swims With Twins
February 23rd, 2009, 10:03 PM
I am always exhausted after a meet. I've got to take several days off to recover. Lucky we've got twins to make sure those days happen. Honestly, I'd say, my pool time warm down is never enough; recovery drinks aren't enough. I guess I'm not in shape enough.

pwb
February 23rd, 2009, 10:53 PM
If it is a mid-season meet I think of the meet as a lactic acid stress workout,so I want to be tired.If it is a taper meet,I'll take it easy for a few days-long slow swimming.


I agree with the comments and suggestions above. I'd also add this. Don't skimp on your warm-down after your last event.

I'm more with Allen than with Craig on this one. Regardless of the meet, I never cool down after my last event. I actually LIKE being sore the day after. If it's an in-season meet, I've found I feel crappy the next day (sometimes the whole week) anyway (the high of competing has worn off), so I may as well wallow in it. If it's a taper meet, I'm probably taking a break anyhow.

aquageek
February 24th, 2009, 08:42 AM
LOL - This thread really interests me. I'm never tired after a meet. I typically have great practices right after the meet. I'm starting to think meets are a break from my training. I warm down lots after each swim and I drink a good recovery drink immediately after I'm done for the day.

The only other thing I can add is that I make sure to go to practice the following day. I used to take a day or two off and I found (years back) that I would be very stiff. The college gals I swam with (and their coaches) recommended to get in and swim the next day as that's what they do to prevent soreness, stiffness, etc. First time I heard this I thought they were all insane. But it works for me. . . but I guess I also train significant yardage over what I actually race, warm up and warm down in a meet.

She-Puffy and I might be twins on this. This is exactly the same as me. I usually have a great workout the next day and then start to feel a bit rough but forge through. I actually really look forward to a hard workout the day after a meet figuring there might be some taper left.

qbrain
February 24th, 2009, 08:59 AM
What I normally do
- not stay hydrated at the meet
- not warm up and cool down before and after events
- leave immediately after the meet
- do not eat for at least an hour after the meet
- eat an unhealthy meal washed down with alcohol when I do finally eat
- do not workout for at least a day

At my last meet
- drank 96oz of water during the 4 hour meet
- warmed up before events and a short (~100yds) cool down after
- everything else the same

I felt much better than normal after that meet.

My next meet is an other short local meet. I expect to be there 3 to 4 hours and I will try the following.
- stay well hydrated with water during the meet
- warm up and down after events (hopefully the outdoor pool is open for warm up/down)
- cool down ~500yds if the outdoor pool is open
- Endurox immediately after my last event
- pack something to eat (peanut butter sandwich maybe) to tide me over until I can get some real food
- eat a healthly meal washed down with water
- hit the gym a little later for 1-2k yoga swim + hot tub
- workout Sunday

After zones, my post meet will resemble Daaaave's and I should have no trouble achieving the pain level Patrick so enjoys.

CreamPuff, Did you feel differently about post meet before you started training mega yardage? Maybe all I need to do is start training 80k/week.

CreamPuff
February 24th, 2009, 10:07 AM
Well, not sure what would happen if you trained 80K a week. I would bet your body would put a stop to it pretty quick. :afraid:

I currently swim 4x a week with the kids and 1x a week with masters (5 swimming sessions a week) averaging 30,000 yds a week. I did average more last summer when I trained for the 25K, but I no longer do that.

This 30-32K is about what I averaged when I swam masters. So to answer your question, I did have the same post meet results when swimming masters or with the kids. The only time I felt AWFUL post meets was the first couple of years when I started up swimming after a 12 year break - and I was a physical fitness mess. :D

I'm liking your current plan.


What I normally do
- not stay hydrated at the meet
- not warm up and cool down before and after events
- leave immediately after the meet
- do not eat for at least an hour after the meet
- eat an unhealthy meal washed down with alcohol when I do finally eat
- do not workout for at least a day

At my last meet
- drank 96oz of water during the 4 hour meet
- warmed up before events and a short (~100yds) cool down after
- everything else the same

I felt much better than normal after that meet.

My next meet is an other short local meet. I expect to be there 3 to 4 hours and I will try the following.
- stay well hydrated with water during the meet
- warm up and down after events (hopefully the outdoor pool is open for warm up/down)
- cool down ~500yds if the outdoor pool is open
- Endurox immediately after my last event
- pack something to eat (peanut butter sandwich maybe) to tide me over until I can get some real food
- eat a healthly meal washed down with water
- hit the gym a little later for 1-2k yoga swim + hot tub
- workout Sunday

After zones, my post meet will resemble Daaaave's and I should have no trouble achieving the pain level Patrick so enjoys.

CreamPuff, Did you feel differently about post meet before you started training mega yardage? Maybe all I need to do is start training 80k/week.

Chris Stevenson
February 24th, 2009, 10:09 AM
I don't get all that tired from most meets, but it depends a lot on what I swim, how many days the meet is, the type of meet (eg trials/finals format is much more tiring, and "significant" meets at the end of a taper can be more mentally draining), and whether significant travel is involved.

Absolutely agree with Allen that meets -- especially mid-season -- should be viewed in the context of training. They are like high-quality workouts. So if I train the next day I'll usually do something other than quality stuff, especially if it was a multi-day meet. And I agree with the poster (maybe multiple?) who suggested that doing nothing can sometimes be worse than getting in and doing something, even if it is all easy.

As an aside: I remember watching the Tour de France when the commentators talked about what the riders would do on their rest days. What they would NOT do is just rest, they all went out for longish rides. They commented that if the riders took it too easy on the rest day, they would actually do worse on the following day. Of course, the TdF is not quite the same as masters swimming :) but I think there is something to the principle. Sometimes even during "heavy" training -- no meet involved -- I feel worse after a day off.

If you are having a hard time recovering from meets -- more specifically, if you are getting very tired by the end of the meet, to the point that you think it is affecting your times in your last event(s) -- then in preparing for your main meet(s) of the season you need to do one of two things: reduce the number of events you enter, or change your training to improve your ability to recover from multiple all-out swims.

Of course, there is the saying that nothing prepares you for racing quite like racing. That's true in practice, but it also means doing enough meets that you know what to expect at state champs, zones or nationals (or whatever). So doing meets is also "training" in that sense.

As far as CP's comment that meet yardage is significantly less than practice, that's a little misleading. Even so, you might be suprised if you add up all the yards you typically swim in a meet, including the meet warmups, warmup & recovery for each race, etc. I think last summer at Sr Champs, between trials and finals I swam about 6000 LCM each day for 3 days, that's nothing to sneeze at. Much of that was low-intensity of course.

But the reason I say it is misleading is that "yardage" alone is a poor metric of training volume anyway. They physical, mental and emotional toll of a meet is (or should be) greater than practices of the same length.

CreamPuff
February 24th, 2009, 10:14 AM
She-Puffy and I might be twins on this. This is exactly the same as me. I usually have a great workout the next day and then start to feel a bit rough but forge through. I actually really look forward to a hard workout the day after a meet figuring there might be some taper left.

I would love to be the female version of Geek. I will work on it further. :)

CreamPuff
February 24th, 2009, 10:25 AM
But the reason I say it is misleading is that "yardage" alone is a poor metric of training volume anyway. They physical, mental and emotional toll of a meet is (or should be) greater than practices of the same length.

This prompted me to review my yardage swam from my last meet @ Auburn. I averaged 3250 yards a day which is about 46% less than what I swim @ practice.

Another interesting point that's worth sharing is that in my practices with USS, I can be swimming entire sets with girls who in meets swim :51 in the 100 fr; 1:51 in the 200 fr; :55 in the 100 fly; 5:00 in the 500 FR; etc. You can be sure that the boys are much faster than that and they may be in my lane as well. So. . . for me, going to the Auburn meet and most masters meets is a nice break as I was in heats with people my speed - :58s and slower in the last heat of 100 fly and so on. So for me, I'd have to say the emotional toll in practices prepare me for fun meets. This also applied when I would race the boys in masters practices - often racing the big boys was/ is much more difficult than racing *most* of the gals in a masters meet.

And this reminds me - I'm off to my one on one speed session today coached by an ex-UGA standout and USS coach of the year. He *kills* me. I'd say this weekly practice is more challenging than a meet b/c I want to please him (hard to do - don't think I ever have) and I'm racing the clock which is much more brutal than any competitor. Well. . . upon second thought, racing the girls who hit :51 in the 100 frees are worse to deal with!

jonblank
February 24th, 2009, 10:30 AM
According to "its a slow show", Cheetos Cheese Puffs are the answer.

CreamPuff
February 24th, 2009, 10:31 AM
According to "its a slow show", Cheetos Cheese Puffs are the answer.

Now THAT is something I'm willing to try!

pwb
February 24th, 2009, 11:04 AM
I totally forgot to mention the perfect, post-meet meal: a double-double with grilled onions from In-n-Out burgers (http://www.in-n-out.com/menu.asp). Far better than Cheetos.

For those of you heading from the east & midwest for Nationals, there are locations of this most awesome of fast food burger joints in Clovis and Fresno.

Tim L
February 24th, 2009, 11:09 AM
LOL - This thread really interests me. I'm never tired after a meet. I typically have great practices right after the meet.

Interesting - same here and my practice times are typically fast for several weeks after a big meet and then I will fall back into more of a routine. I don't put in even half of your yardage so I attribute the faster hangover practices to actually remembering how to swim fast during the course of the taper/meet.

Tim

quicksilver
February 24th, 2009, 11:33 AM
Usually after a meet I am wiped out. I am looking for suggestions on how to prevent the post meet zombie effect.

Pinot Noir.

qbrain
February 24th, 2009, 11:34 AM
CreamPuff, I really thought you were swimming two a days with the kids.


if you are getting very tired by the end of the meet, to the point that you think it is affecting your times in your last event(s) -- then in preparing for your main meet(s) of the season you need to do one of two things: reduce the number of events you enter, or change your training to improve your ability to recover from multiple all-out swims.

My first event and my last event are the same, so I should be able to comment on my conditioning after the meet fairly accurately.

qbrain
February 24th, 2009, 11:47 AM
Pinot Noir.

After Zones. Maybe a 2006 MacRotsie Carneros, since I know you are interested.

ande
February 24th, 2009, 12:30 PM
Train hard far and often so you are in great shape going into the meet

Do one practice every week or 2 that is like a meet

Warm up before races and warm down after races

Stay Hydrated (drink)

Rest between events

Lotion if you've got dry skin

Massages

Soak in a hot tub or bath

Sleep



Usually after a meet I am wiped out.
I am looking for suggestions on how to prevent the post meet zombie effect.

The Fortress
February 24th, 2009, 12:41 PM
- stay well hydrated with water during the meet
- warm up and down after events (hopefully the outdoor pool is open for warm up/down)
- cool down ~500yds if the outdoor pool is open
- Endurox immediately after my last event
- pack something to eat (peanut butter sandwich maybe) to tide me over until I can get some real food
- eat a healthly meal washed down with water
- hit the gym a little later for 1-2k yoga swim + hot tub
- workout Sunday



I try to do this, although I never cool down 500. But I force myself to cool down some after the last event, swim easy the next day and hot tub. If it's a one day in season meet, I'm OK in a day or so. If it's a 2 day taper meet and I've traveled, I just don't feel great for a few days. And I'm not exactly in horrible shape. Usually, I haven't slept well in the hotel and I'm exhausted from the mental/physical exertion. Plus, even though I drink mega water, I'm still somewhat dehydrated from the caffeine.

Those of you with no ill effects, more power to you. I'm sure you're all younger than me.

qbrain
February 24th, 2009, 01:04 PM
I try to do this, although I never cool down 500.

If memory serves... you might consider my focus event "distance". :)

I need a longer cool down to feel good even after practice. Of course, I have never done that much at the end of a meet, but at the end of practice I will do between 4-600 yards to cool down. Expected cool down is only 1-200 yards after practice.

elise526
February 24th, 2009, 01:12 PM
As I suspect, some masters swimmers like myself have to take various health conditions into consideration in recovering from a meet. In my younger years, I all too often made the mistake of riding on endorphins and adrenalin from the meet and went into practice the next day, tearing up the workout. Inevitably, I would get sick or get into a cycle of being so fatigued that my next meet would be disappointing.

No matter how good I feel the day after a big meet, I make myself stay out of the pool for several days. I do other types of exercise like walking and yoga. I'm just an average masters swimmer, but I've been able to do masters swimming for 16 years now without any intervening injuries from swimming.

One thing I have noticed over the years is that you really never know how tired you are until you slow down. Sometimes you need to slow down so that you can feel just how tired your body is.

CreamPuff
February 24th, 2009, 03:20 PM
CreamPuff, I really thought you were swimming two a days with the kids.



LOL. That would be hard to do considering my group (SR I) doesn't do doubles for the majority of the year. My coach will not let me do doubles - didn't do them when training for the 25K either.

Boy, if I were doing doubles, I would sure as heck hope my times were way better than what they are now. . . :bitching::bitching:

The Fortress
February 24th, 2009, 03:48 PM
If memory serves... you might consider my focus event "distance". :)

I need a longer cool down to feel good even after practice. Of course, I have never done that much at the end of a meet, but at the end of practice I will do between 4-600 yards to cool down. Expected cool down is only 1-200 yards after practice.

I do remember! I was actually sort of chastising myself. I usually have to force myself to swim a 200 cool down at the end of a meet. I'm sure I'd feel better if I did even more.

jim thornton
February 24th, 2009, 03:50 PM
I totally forgot to mention the perfect, post-meet meal: a double-double with grilled onions from In-n-Out burgers (http://www.in-n-out.com/menu.asp).

Cream Puff, before someone beats me to it, I would like to invite you to enjoy an In-n-Out with me at the next meet we both attend. No onions, please.

--Your first and still most devoted stalker, Jimby.

nkfrench
February 24th, 2009, 04:47 PM
I take a vacation day Mondays after a 2-day meet. I'm usually not sore, just overall fatigued. It sets in after the adrenaline rush wears off.

The longer events seem to take more out of me than the shorter stuff. 4 events a day for a 2-day meet, mostly 200's and up with a few 100's.

Interestingly enough, I experienced the same fatigue (or worse) when I was in charge of computer ops at a kids meet. Sometimes that's like semi-managed chaos and my stress level would be very high.

I read that Aussie swim legend Kieren Perkins could only swim the mile all-out very infrequently as he required bedrest for a few days afterwards. In 1994 he was coached to swim the mile at the Commonwealth Games going hard for the first 800 split for the world record, then just cruise to the 1500 gold medal to save himself for the World Championships. Perkins deliberately disobeyed and set a world record mile 14:41.66 but fell short of expectations in the event at World Championships where a sub-14:30 was planned.

CreamPuff
February 24th, 2009, 05:35 PM
Cream Puff, before someone beats me to it, I would like to invite you to enjoy an In-n-Out with me at the next meet we both attend. No onions, please.

--Your first and still most devoted stalker, Jimby.

I think I can fit you in at some point after my greatly anticipated Obamagasm which I'm SURE will happen tonight!

However, although I can make a concession and forgo the onions, I do have a nasty habit of slathering EVERYTHING in guacamole. Are you partial guac with a dollop of salsa? I'm feeling a gridge here of rather large magnitude. . . was *possibly* planning on a colonies zones meet in the LCM session. I will bet anything on a distance or fly event. :angel:

BTW, best recovery meal EVER after my 25K - Don Pablo's Conquistador combo platter followed by several margaritas on the rocks and topped off with some fried ice cream. Oh - and this was the ONLY race in which I took 10 days off from swimming. Then back to normal.

aquageek
February 24th, 2009, 05:44 PM
Sorry, She-Puffster, the best thing after a meet is 2 pints of Guiness, preferably around 1 pm Sunday afternoon.

onefish
February 24th, 2009, 07:23 PM
1. hot shower, ceremonial drying and folding of the sacred tech-suit
2. dry, warm clothes that don't stink of chlorine
3. good meaty dinner, not too much liquor (pinot, burgundy, cotes du rhone), quiet with good friends, limited post-mortem
4. if you have to ask, well then....[geez, ain't ya'll got someone?]

elise526
February 24th, 2009, 07:34 PM
It would be interesting to see what the under 40 crowd does as recovery as opposed to the over 40 crowd. As we age, recovery seems to play such a bigger role in how we train.

I can remember doing a "recovery run" of 10 miles on Sunday after a hard 5k, 10k, or triathlon when I was 35 or 36. At that age, it wasn't unusual for me to do a 40 mile bike ride on Sunday as recovery and then do a 10 mile run in the afternoon as more recovery. If I did that now, no matter what kind of shape I am in, I think I'd have to stay in bed for a couple of days!

I'm finding that the older I get, the more of a cool-down I need after my swims. Anybody found this to be the case?

Iwannafly
February 24th, 2009, 08:13 PM
Sorry, She-Puffster, the best thing after a meet is 2 pints of Guiness, preferably around 1 pm Sunday afternoon.


First of all my Geekish friend, Guinness is spelled with two Ns! And if two are good, why aren't six better? I'll bet your boy 'Stud would jump on you too!:argue:

And, I think I have to agree with 'Puff, Mexican food is good any time, but it's especially good after a weekend of self-flagellation (the big word is just for you Jimby)!

CreamPuff
February 24th, 2009, 08:17 PM
I can remember doing a "recovery run" of 10 miles on Sunday after a hard 5k, 10k, or triathlon when I was 35 or 36. At that age, it wasn't unusual for me to do a 40 mile bike ride on Sunday as recovery and then do a 10 mile run in the afternoon as more recovery. If I did that now, no matter what kind of shape I am in, I think I'd have to stay in bed for a couple of days!


Gotta admit, I never could do all that you listed above at ANY age - 18 or otherwise. I guess it's all relative.

Pretty sure we've talked ad nauseam on this forum regarding more recovery is needed as we age. I see a huge difference (and not for the better) between 16 and 36. It flat out sux. And yes, when I hit 40 I've been told that I've got two feet in the grave at that point. :afraid::cane:

elise526
February 24th, 2009, 08:29 PM
Gotta admit, I never could do all that you listed above at ANY age - 18 or otherwise. I guess it's all relative.

Pretty sure we've talked ad nauseam on this forum regarding more recovery is needed as we age. I see a huge difference (and not for the better) between 16 and 36. It flat out sux. And yes, when I hit 40 I've been told that I've got two feet in the grave at that point. :afraid::cane:

The mental toughness one has at 36 just completely trumps what one has at 16. I don't think I could have done what I mentioned at 16. I'm not so sure it was hitting 40 that made me slow down or the cumulative craziness of what I was doing at 34 to 39 without sufficient recovery.

A lady who is doing 24 hour adventure races at 60 and who set amazing running records back in her 30s and 40s taught me the valuable lesson of heart rate training. People think it is silly to wear one of those things when one swims, but it taught me to slow down on those days when I was supposed to be recovering.

chowmi
February 24th, 2009, 08:36 PM
My next meet is an other short local meet. I expect to be there 3 to 4 hours and I will try the following.
- stay well hydrated with water during the meet
- warm up and down after events (hopefully the outdoor pool is open for warm up/down)
- cool down ~500yds if the outdoor pool is open
- Endurox immediately after my last event
- pack something to eat (peanut butter sandwich maybe) to tide me over until I can get some real food
- eat a healthly meal washed down with water
- hit the gym a little later for 1-2k yoga swim + hot tub
- workout Sunday


qbrain, you answered your own question! I assume you mean the SMU meet. What suit are you wearing? I was at D&J today. If the outdoor pool isn't open, you can be sure I will be begging Bobby to take a break during the meet. I find that stretching and a few jumping jacks is a very good substitute for cool down, along with "wonder woman" arm/body swings. But stand in one place, don't twirl around.

mctrusty
February 24th, 2009, 08:59 PM
The mental toughness one has at 36 just completely trumps what one has at 16. I don't think I could have done what I mentioned at 16. I'm not so sure it was hitting 40 that made me slow down or the cumulative craziness of what I was doing at 34 to 39 without sufficient recovery that made me slow down.


I have a good friend who is an elite runner. He told me that a lot of distance athletes -- marathoners, triathletes -- peak in their 30's.

qbrain
February 25th, 2009, 09:52 AM
qbrain, you answered your own question! I assume you mean the SMU meet. What suit are you wearing? I was at D&J today. If the outdoor pool isn't open, you can be sure I will be begging Bobby to take a break during the meet. I find that stretching and a few jumping jacks is a very good substitute for cool down, along with "wonder woman" arm/body swings. But stand in one place, don't twirl around.

LOL, I answered my own question? If you read the responses before my answer, I just consolidated them to try out at SMU. So I sorta answered my own question by stealing everyone else's answer. :)

I am just wearing a practice suit.

I am pretty sure I want more cool down than a couple wonder woman twirls, as entertaining as that would be.

I think I know who you are, and if I am correct, it should be easy for you to pick me out. I will be the only person you don't already know :)

Doug Adamavich
February 25th, 2009, 10:15 AM
I've been toying with the following formula for a while and it works for me.


Warmdown after last event if possible, usually 200-300 nice and easy.
Long shower with lukewarm to cool water.
Drink 500ml of Heed or G2 immediately thereafter.
Change into comfortable clothes and shoes.
Stay off my feet as much as possible.
Eat a high-protein meal within an hour, preferably with some complex carbohydrates.*
Drink lots of water and take 2-3 Advil before bed.
Go to bed early.
Take the following day off from working out, mentally and physically unplug.

I find that if I do these things, along with drinking plenty of water and getting electrolytes during the meet, I feel OK the next day. Yes, there will be residual soreness but nothing too bad. The key is to listen to your body and keep it hydrated. I also think cold showers help too since they reduce muscle swelling.

Call me strange, this is what works for me.

*beer and fries count as complex carbohydrates.

CreamPuff
February 25th, 2009, 11:22 AM
I do almost exactly this with two exceptions.

Why would you not drink Heed during the competition and then Hammer Recoverite Recovery Drink after?

And I skip the Advil. Makes me tighten up/ feel hung over later.


I've been toying with the following formula for a while and it works for me.


Warmdown after last event if possible, usually 200-300 nice and easy.
Long shower with lukewarm to cool water.
Drink 500ml of Heed or G2 immediately thereafter.
Change into comfortable clothes and shoes.
Stay off my feet as much as possible.
Eat a high-protein meal within an hour, preferably with some complex carbohydrates.*
Drink lots of water and take 2-3 Advil before bed.
Go to bed early.
Take the following day off from working out, mentally and physically unplug.

I find that if I do these things, along with drinking plenty of water and getting electrolytes during the meet, I feel OK the next day. Yes, there will be residual soreness but nothing too bad. The key is to listen to your body and keep it hydrated. I also think cold showers help too since they reduce muscle swelling.

Call me strange, this is what works for me.

*beer and fries count as complex carbohydrates.

Doug Adamavich
February 25th, 2009, 12:14 PM
Why would you not drink Heed during the competition and then Hammer Recoverite Recovery Drink after?

During competition I drink water and Alka-Selzer, that seems to work best for me. I tend to sip it and not chug it in between events. The Heed gets consumed in a few minutes after I am done. Feels really good too, very impressed with the results.


And I skip the Advil. Makes me tighten up/ feel hung over later.

I find it helps with inflammation, especially if I am doing a lot of breaststroke.

All this seems to work for me after several years of error and error. Somehow I stumbled upon the right combo that enables me to feel OK even after tough meets.

Note, I focus on long course and summer training. Most of the meets I swim are during warm/hot parts of the year. I felt great at Portland even after the locals said it was hot :D

qbrain
February 25th, 2009, 01:47 PM
Most of the meets I swim are during warm/hot parts of the year.

So, Feb - Nov for you?

Doug Adamavich
February 25th, 2009, 02:37 PM
So, Feb - Nov for you?

Nah, it's only toasty May-September. The rest of the year it is pretty nice, although it can get frosty from Dec-Feb.

thewookiee
February 25th, 2009, 02:39 PM
I will let you know after the meet Sunday. Esp. after a 5 hour trip back home. I wonder how I will feel on Monday and Tuesday.

qbrain
February 28th, 2009, 06:24 PM
My next meet is an other short local meet. I expect to be there 3 to 4 hours and I will try the following.
- stay well hydrated with water during the meet
- warm up and down after events (hopefully the outdoor pool is open for warm up/down)
- cool down ~500yds if the outdoor pool is open
- Endurox immediately after my last event
- pack something to eat (peanut butter sandwich maybe) to tide me over until I can get some real food
- eat a healthly meal washed down with water
- hit the gym a little later for 1-2k yoga swim + hot tub
- workout Sunday


First, I feel much better right now than I usually do after a meet. This is a recap comparing what I said I would do, to what I actually did.

- Stayed hydrated: 96oz during the meet
- 500yd crowded warm up before meet
- no warm up cool down during the meet. There was one 5 minute break during the meet that wasn't helpful to me.
- Didn't stay to see if we cool cool down after the meet
- PureSport immediately after last event mixed with 30oz of water
- 16 oz of gatorade ~10 minutes after last event
- forgot to pack something to eat for after the meet
- 30 minute drive home
- ate boneless skinless chicken breast with BBQ sauce and mashed potatoes
- drank another 16 oz of water with lunch
- 2 ibuprofen
- get to the gym about 1 hour after the meet
- swim 900 ez until I get kicked out because they are hosting a meet
- drank another 30oz of water while at the gym
- no hot tub
- back home to shower and dry clothes finally
- chocolate cookies, glass of whole milk
- 2 ibuprofen
- Emergen-C (like zip fizz, vitamin c+b complex drink mix)

That was about 3 hours ago and I am still fully functional.

I don't think warm up and cool down affect how I feel out of the water. I am positive that I will feel better tomorrow when I get in the water because of that 900 yards I was able to get in at the gym today. Swimming ez after the meet was pain free today.

If you add up all the liquid I drank today, it was a lot. So one key to me feeling well post meet is lots of liquid, plus restoring the lost electrolytes right after the meet. Previously, I have always drank lots of water, but I think the puresport and gatorade most meet allowed me to retain the water instead of... pissing it all away :)

Eating quickly after the meet was a plus, because I am usually starving by the time I actually eat after a meet, but I am not so sure this was a deciding factor on how I feel.

The b-complex I think helped with a headache, but it might have just been that I needed more ibuprofen.

Hopefully my copious details will help anyone else who is trying to avoid the post meet zombie effect.

Thanks for the suggestions from everyone, and I would love to hear from anyone who is experimenting with their post meet recovery routine.