PDA

View Full Version : Hitting lane line



freeflykami
March 6th, 2009, 02:54 PM
I am constantly doing it in practice and have nasty bruised on my right forearm. I mean ugly enough for my kids ped. to ask suspicious questions. I guess they look like I have been man handled. Nasty, green old brusies, with red/purple new ones on top. Plus they HURT! And seem to never heal with 3 practices a week.

Anyway, any suggestions besides, don't hit the lane line? Is there some kind of arm armour for swimming?

trinollinger
March 6th, 2009, 03:08 PM
Are there a ton of people in the lane? Are you hitting it on a certain stoke?

freeflykami
March 6th, 2009, 03:15 PM
not a whole lot of people 6-8. and freestyle mostly at the end of the pull, right as my hand is coming out of the water. it almost feels like it gets caught between the floats(?).
I think part of the problem is people doing fly during regular sets. I got hit hard engouh to stop me once and have found myself drifting to the right since then.

swimshark
March 6th, 2009, 03:49 PM
I know the lane lines your pool uses and they are painful if you hit them. The best thing I can say is to stay as far away from them as possible. They can mangle skin pretty bad. I hit them in one of your practices and came up with a swollen hand.

slowfish
March 6th, 2009, 05:38 PM
i can really relate to this. i find it really hard to swim fly when circling with more 3+ people. the knuckle bashings and lane lines swipings make me do alot of one-arm when passing.

i know there must be a way to do this because people have to share lanes all the time. what am i doing wrong?

ddl
March 6th, 2009, 10:01 PM
I have a related but different problem: When I swim breaststroke, my foot would hit the lane line while kicking, and it hurts, especially when I kick hard. That means my feet are too high, but I don't know why--I didn't throw my head into the bottom of the pool...:confused:

smontanaro
March 7th, 2009, 10:13 AM
I think the lane lines where I swim must have knives hidden in them. I've cut my hand a couple times in the past month and it seems I whack my hand on the lane line upon entry at least two or three times each practice. I must tend to drift to the right. You'd think I'd learn, but noooo.....

KEWebb18
March 7th, 2009, 01:22 PM
I know that when I get tired I swing my arms out more to the side--hence the current bruises on my right hand after thursday's workout when I collided with someone's paddles. That is usually a wake up call to me that my stroke is off and I need to focus more on form and less on speed.
I had a teammate on my college team that was brutal. She would kick under the lane lines doing breaststroke--I got it a couple of times in the abdomen ....and she would beat you up worse if you shared a lane with her.

Syd
March 7th, 2009, 10:07 PM
I do the same thing on a regular basis, too. Almost lost the nail on my right thumb several times as a result. It hurts like hell. But for me it always happens when I am sharing a lane and doing fly. I move too far over to the right and hit my right thumb on the lane line during the entry. To avoid this happening, I now switch to one arm fly when I see someone coming in the opposite direction. I don't like it, though, as it messes with my rhythm.

If it is happening to you as your hand is coming out of the water then I would suggest you try recovering your hand closer to your body. Brush your hand past your thigh just before exiting the water. Perhaps your out sweep is too wide and this is when your arm is hitting the lane line.

You might be over reacting to that knock you took and moving too far over to the right. Try moving left a little more. The swimmer coming in the opposite direction will also give way a little.

It is difficult, though, when sharing lanes. Lots of practice will help you to judge the ideal distance.

Hope the bruises on your arms heal.:)

ddl
March 8th, 2009, 11:37 PM
By the way, this helps solve the mystery of the bruises I find on my arms and legs from time to time that seem to have come out of nowhere ;)

stillwater
March 9th, 2009, 06:21 PM
I remember the hot dog lane lines were bad when cracked, but it was the Kiefer Cheesegrater that would bleed you. A very effective traing method.

Ahelee Sue Osborn
March 9th, 2009, 06:46 PM
Backstroke:
Catch deeper so that you pull below the lane line and not near the surface.
Be sure you are "throwing water" at the end of your pull, down to your feet. This will help you swim in a straight line.
If you throw water out to the side, you push yourself into the lane line or the middle of your lane.

Butterfly:
A team I swam on a few years ago setup the lanes to swim butterfly sets so that they alternated, Clockwise Lane / Counter-Clockwise Lane from opposite ends to avoid hitting eachother across the lane lines so often.


Aren't most of us scarred for life after years of hitting lanelines, swimmers in paddles or w/wide arm recovery?

I almost died the first time I laid eyes on a set of those gigantor TYR paddles one of our bad a** distance guys showed up with at practice years ago.
(I do think he retired early with bad shoulders)

smontanaro
March 9th, 2009, 08:07 PM
I almost died the first time I laid eyes on a set of those gigantor TYR paddles one of our bad a** distance guys showed up with at practice years ago. (I do think he retired early with bad shoulders)

Yeah, but they protected his hands from the lane lines. ;)

swim53
March 10th, 2009, 07:30 PM
Ahelee,
Thanks for the backstroke tip. :applaud::applaud:I have been hitting lane ropes forever, esp. outside.

orca1946
March 10th, 2009, 07:54 PM
Do you pull thru to your leg? Move over even 6 inches will give you the room you need.

nkfrench
March 11th, 2009, 02:08 PM
I remember the hot dog lane lines were bad when cracked, but it was the Kiefer Cheesegrater that would bleed you. A very effective traing method.

Our "good" laneropes are (I think) Wave Eaters aka Hand Eaters. They get put in the pool during the HS championships season then are swapped out for the old laneropes afterwards. That way the good lanelines don't fade out from the chlorine and they look pretty. And so do the swimmer's hands and arms and feet from all the bruises and cuts we get during that timeframe.