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View Full Version : A 20-something's Plea to U.S. Masters Swimming



Ahelee Sue Osborn
March 24th, 2009, 02:33 AM
Loved the home page feature on the USMS website today...

http://www.usms.org/features.php?id=122

Since the NCAA Championships are all around us these two weeks, who hasn't thought about our outstanding collegiate swimmers?

But have any of us considered inviting them to join us at masters in their near future?

Masters Swim Clubs in college areas could do all kinds of great things to inspire a retiring collegiate swimmer to join them.

Invite them to talk to the team at a social event would be an easy no-brainer.

But even beyond.
How about asking them to hold a clinic for your club?
And pay them since now they can accept the cash - and probably need it?

What else can we do to entice them to join our clubs (rack up points at the championship meets) and begin the rest of their healthy fit lives?

2fish&1whale
March 24th, 2009, 08:26 AM
Though I only swim for my self and do not compete in any meets, I have always tried to promote the masters swimming cause(both as a form of excersize and a way to compete-all with the support of a team) when talking to graduating high school and college swimmers. It is surprising to me how many have never heard of this program. I think the ball is in our hands and it is up to masters swimmers to "recruit". Was MS present at the Conference and NCAA meets?

pwb
March 24th, 2009, 08:54 AM
If we need a volunteer to go to next year's men's NCAA DI Championships to sit at a desk (on deck, of course, about mid-pool) and promote USMS and recruit swimmers, I'm your guy. I'll selflessly take some vacation time for an all-access deck pass:)

KEWebb18
March 24th, 2009, 08:57 AM
As a former college swimmer(never on the same level as those who qualify for ncaa champs), I can see two sides to the argument here. I agree that it would be great to have former NCAA level swimmers involved in usms and offer their expertise to clubs. My experience tells me that most of these kids want to enjoy their last few months of school, maybe train for national and international competition, and then move on with their lives.
I would be interested to find out how many of this caliber of swimmers get involved in usms, and at what age does that happen.

Chris Stevenson
March 24th, 2009, 08:57 AM
It is surprising to me how many have never heard of this program. I think the ball is in our hands and it is up to masters swimmers to "recruit". Was MS present at the Conference and NCAA meets?

True, it IS surprising how many have never heard of masters swimming. I think partnerships between USAS and USMS clubs are one way to change that...there are three major age-group teams in Richmond and ALL of them share pool time and at some point will see groups of masters swimmers practicing. There are a handful of local masters people who swim at local USA-S meets, too, so I think most age-groupers will grow up knowing that it is "out there," even if the specifics are vague.

I think pushing USMS at college swimmers at NCAAs or conference meets might be a tough sell, however gently it is done. I had a pretty benign college swimming experience, and I wanted nothing to do with competitive swimming after my last event at NCAAs my senior year.

And yet, about nine months later, I started practicing with a masters group...I still wanted to exercise, and I was attracted by the lower yardage, the fact that you could get out of practice -- or change it to your liking -- at any time. The social aspect was good too. So were beer relays.

It might be interesting for USMS to survey their current ranks for former (young) competitive swimmers and find out what drew them back (if this hasn't already been done).

The article talked about varsity college swimmers, but I can tell you one potentially greater source of young USMS members: college club teams. I wouldn't be surprised if there were more people on such teams than on varsity swim teams, and their attitude towards swimming more closely mirrors that of a typical masters swimmer. I think it may be a pretty seamless transition.

Along those lines, I've often thought that USMS should just waive the annual membership fee for swimmers in the 18-24 age group. If even one in ten of such swimmers becomes a lifetime member, I bet the organization would more than recoup the investment.

meldyck
March 24th, 2009, 09:24 AM
When I lived in Flagstaff I had contact with the NAU women's team swimmers and tried to encourage them to continue swimming after college (at the time, I believe none of them made the Div I cuts). Mostly the response was, 'hey, I'm just swimming because I have a scholarship and can't wait to be done with it.'

My take on this is that there IS major burnout associated with college swimming that needs to be overcome before USMS can make much of an impact on this potential group of master's swimmers.

osterber
March 24th, 2009, 09:46 AM
Yes - burnout is big. Graduating varsity swimmers usually want to be nowhere near a pool, and if you go after them too hard, you'll scare them off. In my experience, it often takes several years before these types want to be back in the pool at all.

One great way to spread awareness is to get these varsity swimmers to work at masters meets. It can be setup as a fundraiser for the varsity team (or their "friends of" group)... i.e., the kids work the meet, and money goes to the team, not individually. We've done this a bunch, and then these varsity swimmers get to see first hand that there is swimming life after college, and that there are even fast swimmers in masters.

-Rick

osterber
March 24th, 2009, 09:48 AM
For a data point of one... it took me about 5 years after graduating college before I had any desire to get back in the pool with a team. Very happy that I did... but I definitely needed that time away.

-Rick

ViveBene
March 24th, 2009, 09:54 AM
I found the article hokey and unconvincing (and matronizing). College is a time for changes and transitions. The end of a piece of work in college often has some emotional content. I burst into tears during my last German exam! That did not mean I wanted the tenured profs to rush into the room and tell me in how many different ways I could continue with German.

There are other things to explore in the world. Taking a break and marching resolutely in a different direction is fine, and also useful for personal growth.

hofffam
March 24th, 2009, 10:51 AM
I thought the article sounded desperate and (I'm sorry) too emotional.

Lines like "...And each of us has the responsibility to share our experiences with these athletes..." are just dumb. We do not have any such responsibility.

I would rather see college graduates focus on getting a head start on their career. They may have been swimming competitively for 15 years and are just in no mood to train again. The intensity of college swimming is so high - that burnout is common. I suspect that many finish their college swimming career without love for the sport - they do it out of loyalty for their team, their school, and an ego that says they can't quit.

My son swims in college now. When graduation comes around - I will spend little time trying to convince him to swim Masters. I'll remind him it exists and might be a good way for him to stay fit. But most of all I want him to get the best job he can in a tough, competitive job market.

tjrpatt
March 24th, 2009, 10:56 AM
I am pretty sure that these swimmers will need a break from the pool if they aren't Nationally ranked(top 2% percentile or something) and trying to make a World or Olympic team in the future. When I left college swimming, I didn't want to be nowhere near a pool. Of course, I did the occasional lap swimming once every 6 months. Heck, I didn't want to compete ever again. But, after watching Phelps in the 2003 World Champs, I sort of got the urge to compete again and did in 2004.

Dacsus65
March 24th, 2009, 11:00 AM
I was actually recruited to USMS by a NCAA swimmer. He is the son of a friend who has been asking why I wasn't swimming with Masters since he was a senior in High School. :cane:

knelson
March 24th, 2009, 11:07 AM
I'm sure there are lots of college swimmers who need a total break from swimming, but there are many more who would still want to swim if it was a low stress activity they could do on their own terms. These are the ones USMS can reach out to. There's no reason to just assume they all need or want a break from swimming.

Aqua Jock
March 24th, 2009, 11:25 AM
Rumur has it, that there's a splinter group of vigillantes called the USMS Cougar Committee, (USMS CC.) They forumulated aggressive "enticement" plans years ago. Various USMS members confirm sightings of successful implementation as their prey "racks up points" at meets in the pool & other places like hotel hot tubs. Further the USMS CC creates an annual target list & most wanted posters. They are a highly effective covert operation doing most of their work under covers.

AJ



What else can we do to entice them to join our clubs (rack up points at the championship meets) and begin the rest of their healthy fit lives?

SLOmmafan
March 24th, 2009, 11:45 AM
I would think that even more than NCAA swimmers, we should look to ex high school and USAS swimmers. Just because someone did not swim college does not mean that they are not good swimmers who have room to improve times and stay in shape. A relatively small portion of swimmers ever go on to swim college, and even fewer can compete at a D1 level school and go to NCAA's.

smontanaro
March 24th, 2009, 12:56 PM
One great way to spread awareness is to get these varsity swimmers to work at masters meets. It can be setup as a fundraiser for the varsity team (or their "friends of" group)... i.e., the kids work the meet, and money goes to the team, not individually.

UIC's mens and womens teams work Big Shoulders. They are kind of bleary-eyed at the start of the day, but wake up after a couple cups of coffee. ;)

Skip

hofffam
March 24th, 2009, 02:50 PM
I'm sure there are lots of college swimmers who need a total break from swimming, but there are many more who would still want to swim if it was a low stress activity they could do on their own terms. These are the ones USMS can reach out to. There's no reason to just assume they all need or want a break from swimming.

I didn't mean to imply they ALL want a break from swimming. I just think the front page article is kinda dumb. I think most NCAA swimmers know that "Masters" swimming exists. I'm not gonna "plea" for more USMS swimmers from the NCAA ranks.

knelson
March 24th, 2009, 02:57 PM
I didn't mean to imply they ALL want a break from swimming. I just think the front page article is kinda dumb.

See, I thought the article was pretty good. I think a lot of us assume that either a. college swimmers already know all about USMS, and/or b. college swimmers aren't interested in masters swimming. The "plea" may have been a little overblown, but I think the author brings up a good point that it can't hurt for current masters swimmers to reach out to the kids who might otherwise be thinking they are done with swimming.

pwolf66
March 24th, 2009, 04:12 PM
I didn't mean to imply they ALL want a break from swimming. I just think the front page article is kinda dumb. I think most NCAA swimmers know that "Masters" swimming exists. I'm not gonna "plea" for more USMS swimmers from the NCAA ranks.

While the use of the word 'plea' is a little over the top, from my experience most younger (22 and under) swimmers have no idea that Masters swimming exists and those that might know 'of' Masters swimming don't realize exactly what it is.

aztimm
March 24th, 2009, 04:22 PM
Back when I did meets, our coach at the time (Ron Johnson) made some deals with the ASU team. They let us use the competition pool, they provided timers (the swim team), and he gave the team any profits from the meet. It was a great system. We had very knowledgeable people timing us, who would sometimes even cheer us on. I remember some of them asking how long I had been swimming, how often I swim, etc. Was a great way to mix us up.

Currently our head masters coach is an assistant women's team coach, and we have a bit of interaction with both the men's and women's teams. I'm sure they're aware we exist, but I don't know how well they know about masters swimming in general.

Seagurl51
March 24th, 2009, 04:31 PM
As a 20-something the biggest "issue" (if you could call it that) I have with Masters is that it doesn't really cater to us. I think out of all the people on my team maybe 6 are under 30, and we have a pretty big team. And as nice as everyone is on the team (they're GREAT wonderful people) it's awkward to go to team social events where everyone brings their kids and talks about work. Other than swimming it's hard to find common interests. I think that is the biggest challenge when you're talking about recruiting new grads to swim. You need to overcome the stigma that Masters is for old people before you can try to recruit younger people.

Jason Marsteller
March 24th, 2009, 05:22 PM
As a 20-something the biggest "issue" (if you could call it that) I have with Masters is that it doesn't really cater to us. I think out of all the people on my team maybe 6 are under 30, and we have a pretty big team. And as nice as everyone is on the team (they're GREAT wonderful people) it's awkward to go to team social events where everyone brings their kids and talks about work. Other than swimming it's hard to find common interests. I think that is the biggest challenge when you're talking about recruiting new grads to swim. You need to overcome the stigma that Masters is for old people before you can try to recruit younger people.

When I was in the sports information field, this same issue came up a lot at CoSIDA events (the national association for sports information). But, an interior, informal group was created called Young CoSIDA. Maybe something similar could be done within Masters? It's really difficult to try to get everyone from 20 to 100 on the same page. Might not hurt to have some informal groups catering to the various larger age groupings within the sport.

Not sure how you would go about putting something like that together, but it could at least be a discussion to be had.

SLOmmafan
March 24th, 2009, 06:09 PM
I am the youngest member of my team at 25. A few issues I see off hand with recruiting the "under 30 crowd" in general:

- Money; a lot of us in my age group don't feel like spending the extra $30 +/month it takes to be on a team (in addition to gym fees, etc.)

- Fitness; a lot of 20 somethings either feel they are in good enough shape currently or do not have the motivation yet to swim for health/fitness reasons.

- Competition; generally the 20 something swimmer falls into one of two categories - really fast ex-swimmer or new adult swimmer. The age group is not very conducive to "middle of the road" type swimmers.

All this is my opinion, based on my experience swimming in USMS. On my team, I fall into the "really fast" category - though I don't feel this would be true at the state and National level Master's competition. It does tend to be hard to get overly motivated when the majority of my teammates are 25+ years older than me and not really at my ability level. Recruiting additional ex college or high school swimmers to my team would certainly up my level of swimming and be good for things all around.

abc
March 26th, 2009, 11:37 AM
When I lived in Flagstaff I had contact with the NAU women's team swimmers and tried to encourage them to continue swimming after college (at the time, I believe none of them made the Div I cuts). Mostly the response was, 'hey, I'm just swimming because I have a scholarship and can't wait to be done with it.'

My take on this is that there IS major burnout associated with college swimming that needs to be overcome before USMS can make much of an impact on this potential group of master's swimmers.

I would definitely agree with this statement. Also, not to sound elitist or anything, but I don't necessarily want to work out with a bunch of 22 year old kids either. I'm beyond the age of discussing how much alcohol I consumed the night before and the stupid things I can't remember doing. I kind of like things the way they are. Most of the college swimmers I know took several years off before joining a masters team, if they joined one at all. Pool space is also a problem where I train. For me, many college swimmers would be better off taking some time away from the pool and returning to masters at a later date. Recruiting these swimmers seems absurd to me. If they want to swim with a team, they'll find one. Hanging out at NCAAs and promoting masters swimming would have been viewed very negatively in my day. We went to NCAAs to kick butt, not to talk to old swimmers we'd never heard of.

Jazz Hands
March 26th, 2009, 11:49 AM
Also, not to sound elitist or anything, but I don't necessarily want to work out with a bunch of 22 year old kids either. I'm beyond the age of discussing how much alcohol I consumed the night before and the stupid things I can't remember doing.

You don't appear to be beyond the age of judging people based on how old they are.

smontanaro
March 26th, 2009, 12:07 PM
Warning: I never swam in college.

I think the main reason to encourage post-collegiate swimmers to keep swimming is that it is an excellent lifetime exercise. How many of you ex-collegiate swimmer types got back into the pool after a long hiatus in part because you were now N pounds overweight? Even if they don't compete or swim 5000yds per practice, there is a valuable benefit to just keep the motor running.

Skip

quicksilver
March 26th, 2009, 12:19 PM
I guess it's nice for college swimmers to know that the option to workout and compete still exists.
But in retrospect, if I knew that a masters team existed near my hometown 25 years ago...I may have taken a pass on it, just due to burn-out.


That said, Master swimming isn't just about the competition. There's a connection to be made by people of all ages who share the same enjoyment of getting wet and staying fit.

Our group has always been very welcoming of young people. And we support and encourage them in whatever they may be doing outside of the pool. A network of life experienced adults can be a plus for many younger people who are just figuring out the ups and downs of life.

scyfreestyler
March 26th, 2009, 12:29 PM
I would definitely agree with this statement. Also, not to sound elitist or anything, but I don't necessarily want to work out with a bunch of 22 year old kids either. I'm beyond the age of discussing how much alcohol I consumed the night before and the stupid things I can't remember doing. I kind of like things the way they are. Most of the college swimmers I know took several years off before joining a masters team, if they joined one at all. Pool space is also a problem where I train. For me, many college swimmers would be better off taking some time away from the pool and returning to masters at a later date. Recruiting these swimmers seems absurd to me. If they want to swim with a team, they'll find one. Hanging out at NCAAs and promoting masters swimming would have been viewed very negatively in my day. We went to NCAAs to kick butt, not to talk to old swimmers we'd never heard of.


I suspect you have your reasons for feeling this way and that is fine. Having said that, I have been swimming with some kids in the 19-22 range over the past few years who are nothing at all like you describe.

swimgrl45
March 26th, 2009, 01:52 PM
i think i may have missed it but anyone know who wrote this article?

Knightswimmer2
March 26th, 2009, 04:49 PM
Warning: I never swam in college.

I think the main reason to encourage post-collegiate swimmers to keep swimming is that it is an excellent lifetime exercise. How many of you ex-collegiate swimmer types got back into the pool after a long hiatus in part because you were now N pounds overweight? Even if they don't compete or swim 5000yds per practice, there is a valuable benefit to just keep the motor running.

Skip


I just graduated from college last may and I really didn't take any time off from when college ended to beginning post collegiate swimming career...As soon as school was done, I watched the olympics and I just knew I had to be back in the water competing.

But I do feel kind of out of place at meets...Usually being the youngest or one of the youngest there really limits how much participation you want to do with masters swimming. If there was more geared to our age group then I could see the 18-24 age group growing in numbers, and having a larger turn out. If they keep the appeal up for the younger crowd then you would have more ex college kids comming out.

Jazz Hands
March 26th, 2009, 05:10 PM
I just graduated from college last may and I really didn't take any time off from when college ended to beginning post collegiate swimming career...As soon as school was done, I watched the olympics and I just knew I had to be back in the water competing.

But I do feel kind of out of place at meets...Usually being the youngest or one of the youngest there really limits how much participation you want to do with masters swimming. If there was more geared to our age group then I could see the 18-24 age group growing in numbers, and having a larger turn out. If they keep the appeal up for the younger crowd then you would have more ex college kids comming out.

I agree with this. A lot of people have the attitude that if you're in your 20s you're not a "real" Masters swimmer. Very unwelcoming. But if we got more young people competing, there would be a snowball effect, where you feel more like you belong at the meets, which would bring in even more people. Getting the process started is the hard part.

smontanaro
March 26th, 2009, 05:25 PM
Be careful, you might get what you wish for. If too many 20-somethings join USMS the old farts might feel outnumbered and follow CremePuff to USS where we would all swim in the 18-and-over age group! ;)

aquageek
March 26th, 2009, 05:34 PM
I agree with this. A lot of people have the attitude that if you're in your 20s you're not a "real" Masters swimmer. Very unwelcoming. But if we got more young people competing, there would be a snowball effect, where you feel more like you belong at the meets, which would bring in even more people. Getting the process started is the hard part.

Now, Jazzy, don't get all up in arms. Of course you are a real master's swimmer and a welcome member of the gang. However, I contend that the competition in masters doesn't really get going until 35-39, when the college studs have burned out, gotten fat, had a kid or two and need to change their evil ways and come back. You are fast by any standard.

chowmi
March 26th, 2009, 06:53 PM
As a 20-something the biggest "issue" (if you could call it that) I have with Masters is that it doesn't really cater to us. I think out of all the people on my team maybe 6 are under 30, and we have a pretty big team. And as nice as everyone is on the team (they're GREAT wonderful people) it's awkward to go to team social events where everyone brings their kids and talks about work. Other than swimming it's hard to find common interests. I think that is the biggest challenge when you're talking about recruiting new grads to swim. You need to overcome the stigma that Masters is for old people before you can try to recruit younger people.

I sympathize. A lot depends on the mix of ages of the team partyers. I won't show up to a masters swim party unless Santa is going to be there, or if there will be a bounce house. Thinking only of myself (actually, for my girls), I was somewhat offended that this past year's Halloween party explicitly said No children allowed!!! heeheehee!

Paul Smith
March 26th, 2009, 06:56 PM
I see a fair amount of recently graduated college swimmers come and go with Sun Devil Masters as well as Brophy...Although a lot of us really enjoy having them around and the stepped up intensity they can bring I also see how there is a bit of a genertional gap for some folks...given how much Laura and I like to rpestend we are still in college we seem to have far less of a problem with that!

I'll go back to what I've said a few times before on this topic. To me the "low-hanging fruit" if you will is not the recent college grad but rather the high school senior who swam but may not be good enough to swim in college...I've seen far more of these come on board at ASU and they tend to stick around.

2fish&1whale
March 26th, 2009, 07:14 PM
I'll go back to what I've said a few times before on this topic. To me the "low-hanging fruit" if you will is not the recent college grad but rather the high school senior who swam but may not be good enough to swim in college...I've seen far more of these come on board at ASU and they tend to stick around.[/quote]


Couldn't agree more with this!
Many high school kids are either not good enough to join their college team or their school has no team. But that does not mean that they don't love to swim(exercise) or be part of a team. Whether that means they compete or not is really not that important. But this is the group that is pretty much unaware that masters exists and would be more inclined to participate. Especially when faced with the freshman 15!

From talking with the 20 something swimmers at our pool I have learned that they miss the structure of their former practices and the routine it gave them (maybe not the intensity), having the motivation of working with a group of people and for some -the competition.

I do believe though that cost is a huge factor, for a college student or grad, and that maybe that should be taken into consideration.

aquageek
March 26th, 2009, 07:30 PM
No children allowed!!!

As a father, these are the three most beautiful words in the English language in regards to a social outing.

chowmi
March 26th, 2009, 09:23 PM
As a father, these are the three most beautiful words in the English language in regards to a social outing.

Mine are "kids eat free"!!

Jason Marsteller
March 26th, 2009, 09:31 PM
Was joking with Josh Davis that if he interviews someone this weekend after a race who just finished their NCAA career, he should phrase it "What's next for you now that you finished your pre-Masters career?"

Not sure he's going to do it, but never know! Keep your ears open! *grin*

Muppet
March 27th, 2009, 12:30 AM
Very interesting responses here. In general, I think we need a Paradigm shift in thinking - both of the "older" crowd and the younger crowd. Some thoughts from someone who fits the 20-something label...

Burnout -
I saw an awful lot of "oh, they're burned out, they don't want to swim after XX years of swimming..." statements in the responses so far. It is a very valid response. BUT... Just because that was your reason, or what you hear on deck, not everyone wants to - or can - give it up that easily. Chris already pointed out that after 9 months, he was back in the water; the blue muppet switched from swimming to water polo to masters swimming without ever leaving the water. Chris and Kirk alluded to it earlier - there are plenty of kids out where who get the itch to come back, but they don't always know how to scratch it.

Maturity -
This topic works for both the old and young crowd. For you geezers, not every college or post college kid goes out and gets hammered every weekend and then talks about only about beer and babes. For you puppies, not every older person sits around talking about work and their kids. Sorry to call you guys out on that, but that is just lame. Go out on a limb and get to know your teammates, young and old, outside the pool. Doing that, I have found plenty of good masters friends who are older, employed, married and with child, and somehow we all get along.

I know plenty of adults who will get hammered and talk about beer and babes to no end... while I converse about work, and/or play with their kids, and then at the end of the night, it is me wrestling away keys (because they're too immature to admit they're too drunk to drive) and driving their drunk asses home. Who's the mature one now?

Costs -
I hear a lot about how masters swimming costs too much for young people. Different teams work out costs differently, but the amount I tracked having spent in '08 on workouts, gear and meet entry fees came out to what I consider to be reasonably on or below par with what someone would spend annually swimming in a USS program. The only difference is that mom & dad aren't paying for it anymore - YOU are!

Also, I just swam with a peer who spent several hundred dollars on a whim buying ski's last weekend. Not all 20-somethings leave college cash-strapped. Now we all have different amounts to start with, and there are plenty of more important things to allocate funds towards than swimming, but nonetheless, if you are smart about how you manage your personal finances, making swimming work is a lot easier.

Competition -
Masters swimming is not all about meets. Our esteemed webmaster posted stats on the forums a while back... something like 19% of the membership does a meet of any kind in a year. No one other than yourself is forcing competition anymore, and in fact there are plenty of 18-29 year olds who are just working out. The ski guy mentioned above swims an OW event every couple years when he gets around to signing up for one. I used to swim with a 2-time 400IM d3 champion. He told me once he'd do a meet when he got back to his college weight. But that leads to another paradigm...

Fitness -
You can't compare your college self to your masters self! Too many times I hear about "oh, well i swam xx time back in college...", "i'm not as fast as I was in college..." Wake up - it is a whole new ballgame. You work for a living, you have kids and family obligations. Once you start swimming masters, you get to start over with a clean slate.


A lot of the topics I've addressed here, there are plenty of things that can be said that will rightfully fit a majority of younger swimmers; and yes, there are always exceptions. But if we change the way we think by shifting our expectations (or even leaving them open for later interpretation), good things will happen.

Muppet
March 27th, 2009, 12:35 AM
I'll go back to what I've said a few times before on this topic. To me the "low-hanging fruit" if you will is not the recent college grad but rather the high school senior who swam but may not be good enough to swim in college...I've seen far more of these come on board at ASU and they tend to stick around.

FYI, Paul, I am one of your low-hanging fruits, and have been swimming with my Masters team since I first arrived at college 10 1/2 years ago.

Can I be a strawberry?

Ahelee Sue Osborn
March 27th, 2009, 03:38 PM
Very interesting responses here. In general, I think we need a Paradigm shift in thinking - both of the "older" crowd and the younger crowd. Some thoughts from someone who fits the 20-something label...

A lot of the topics I've addressed here, there are plenty of things that can be said that will rightfully fit a majority of younger swimmers; and yes, there are always exceptions. But if we change the way we think by shifting our expectations (or even leaving them open for later interpretation), good things will happen.

Nice post on the transition into masters swimming :)

I really don't think all of the responders had the big picture vision of masters swimming in their sight when they posted.

Even I, who loves to get everyone and anyone to come out and give masters practices a try... gets an occasional reminder that masters has the goal of inclusiveness.
I like that a lot and its one of the reasons I'm stickin with it!

That and the water.
Even when I didn't want to race in swim meets, I still wanted the water.

ViveBene
March 28th, 2009, 06:54 AM
The flip side of encouraging more ppl (any age) to join masters swimming is where to put them. Pools are closing right and left. (Has the drain cover issue been resolved?)

Ripple
March 28th, 2009, 08:57 AM
The flip side of encouraging more ppl (any age) to join masters swimming is where to put them. Pools are closing right and left. (Has the drain cover issue been resolved?)
We don't have the drain cover issue here, or pools closing, but a lot of the more popular masters clubs have waiting lists to get in. The ones that don't tend to meet at peculiar times of day that don't suit the average office worker. A lot of people end up at the club-like workouts put on by the city pools program, or the two "Y"s (YM and YW). Which is okay, I guess, but I doubt many of them end up in meets.

knelson
March 28th, 2009, 12:39 PM
Thinking only of myself (actually, for my girls), I was somewhat offended that this past year's Halloween party explicitly said No children allowed!!!

Thinking of only myself, I'm offended when people bring their kids to what is ostensibly an adults only social event.

orca1946
March 28th, 2009, 03:26 PM
I would think that they will take some time off to enjoy life without swimming . Later they will find out they miss it & return.