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jim thornton
March 25th, 2009, 03:45 PM
I am about to start researching an article on masters swimming, including its various physical and psychological benefits.

I am wondering if any of my fellow swimmers know of exercise physiologists, sports psychologists, cardiovascular investigators, swimming scientists, etc. who may have looked at the specific benefits of masters swimming.

So far, researchers I am hoping to interview include:

Dr. Steven Blair, leader author of a recent study on swimming and longevity/risk of premature demise

Dr. Dave Costill,legendary emeritus director of the Ball State human performance lab and a great masters swimmer in his own right http://www.usms.org/comp/tt/toptenind.php?SwimmerID=00640

Dr. Joel Stager, another exercise physiologist and great swimmer (I think in my age group, actually) who was the fellow who found that chocolate milk is a great way to renourish yourself right after a workout http://www.usms.org/comp/tt/toptenind.php?SwimmerID=02AHB

Phil Whitten, another legend in the masters community who did some work years ago at performance declines with age (and how you can avoid or dramatically slow them) http://www.usms.org/comp/tt/toptenind.php?SwimmerID=02F47

Aimee Kimball, Ph.D., a sports psychologist here at UPMC in Pittsburgh

I am looking for, among other things, someone who has looked at the effect of adult swimming on:

mood and emotional regulation

cognition,

cardio health

strength, endurance, joint flexibility/range of motion

injury rates and time sidelined in swimming vs. pavement pounding land sports

the reinforcement aspects, and social camaraderie, of team membership (let's face it, there are very few sports you can be on a team as an adult);

finally, something very specifically on competition, which in some circles is a bit maligned these days, but seems to me a very powerful motivator for lots of masters swimmers to keep going.

Thanks for your help! I may post this on the threads, as well, in the hopes of getting some suggested sources.

If you know anybody that might fit any of these bills, or if you have any research associates/friends who might know somebody, please pass on your suggestions.

My email address: jamesthornton1@comcast.net

PS if you happen to be a guy in the Men's Health demographics, i.e., somewhere between 18 and your 40s, and you have found masters swimming to have been a life-changing and/or life-enriching experience, please drop me a line! I need guys who swam in their younger years and have come back to it; I also need guys who perhaps never swam competitively (or at all) and came to the sport as complete rookies in adulthood.

Thanks!

gigi
March 25th, 2009, 05:20 PM
I'm neither a man, nor an expert on anything relating to swimming. I'm just posting to say that I can't wait to read the article when it comes out. I bet it;ll be in the issue that promises "great abs."

pdjang
March 25th, 2009, 05:21 PM
Hi Jim,
At the 2005 National Senior Games, the U.Pittsburg Medical Center (you mentioned a sports psy there), solicted volunteers to undergo a battery of tests. Besides a demographic questionaire, selected volunteers underwent a series of physical tests (coordination, range of motion, etc) and mental tests (memory, flexibility, etc,) which may have been correlated with performance. I don't recall the PI's name, except that she was a very attractive physician. So much for recall.

If your demographic is Men's Heath (18-40 males), the biggest benefit, IMHO, is that exercise, diet and low stress eliminates the need for the little blue pill. Of course, you need a willing partner, so if your partner is interested in an active lifestyle (e.g. be a USMS member), you should (with probability Q-n) have it made.

P

stillwater
March 25th, 2009, 05:32 PM
I don't recall the PI's name, except that she was a very attractive physician. So much for recall.


Seems like your memory is fine.

orca1946
March 25th, 2009, 06:39 PM
Well. I swam in HS & college from 1960 - 64 & 65 - 67.
I am now 63 & still at it!!
I am state ranked in 11 events but not a record holder.
I used to run & do tris till they replaced my right hip TWICE in 7 years???
So something is to be said for swimming!!:applaud:

pwb
March 26th, 2009, 10:05 AM
I am about to start researching an article on masters swimming, including its various physical and psychological benefits.

I am wondering if any of my fellow swimmers know of exercise physiologists, sports psychologists, cardiovascular investigators, swimming scientists, etc. who may have looked at the specific benefits of masters swimming.


Jim,

You might want to talk with Dr. Jim Miller (http://www.usms.org/people/02HNX) of Virginia masters. I don't know if he's done any research, but do know he's been incredibly active at both the local and national level with Masters swimming.

jim thornton
March 26th, 2009, 10:56 AM
Thanks for the great suggestions. I will try to track down both the Sr. Games PI and Dr. Jim Miller. Dr. Jane More also sent me some good tips via PM.

Mr. O: can you send me an email--I'd like to ask you about the hip surgeries and your switch from running to swimming. jamesthornton1@comcast.net

Gigi, I actually used to have sensational abs, but in order to swim better in a B70, I have purposely let myself add flab for buoyancy. If we ever meet, just imagine the chiseled god beneathe the veneer that has become a sad necessity of us masters swimmers hoping to excel.

PS anyone who'd like to see a story I wrote a few years back on Masters Swimming for Best Life magazine, drop me an email and I will send you the .pdf of "Chlorine is My Prozac."

Note: The title is a little misleading. In reality, Chlorine plus Effexor is My Prozac.

pamkick
August 24th, 2009, 09:49 PM
Jim - Ed Nessel, the coach of the Space Coast Aquanauts is a pharmacist, biochemist and swimmer as well as a coach. He has done quite a bit of studies on science of masters swimming. His web site is www.movingthroughwater.com (http://www.movingthroughwater.com) - you can see some of his articles and contact him thru this web site. He is currently on R&R after a torn shoulder from an accident (not in the water!). Good luck.

ande
August 24th, 2009, 10:38 PM
hi Jim,

In my old swimming blog, I documented every workout from
March 2005 to September 2008 at:
Ande's Swimming Blog - U.S. Masters Swimming Discussion Forums

in particular if you follow my training from

2007 South Central SC Zones on Saturday March 24th 2007 (Saturday March 24, 2007)
till
May 2008 USMS SCY Nats (http://www.usms.org/forums/showthread.php?t=4298&page=108)

you'll see I made significant year to year improvements in the
50 free, 50 fly, 50 bk & 100 IM

my 2007 times / my 2008 times
100 IM 55.48 / 53.70
50 bk 25.75 / 24.41
50 free 22.30 / 21.43
50 Fly 23.93 / 23.20

I believe and my blog will show you that I made these improvements by training for speed and strength. The increased weight training helped me get significantly stronger and faster.

hope this help your article. Swim Faster Faster,

Ande Rasmussen

jim thornton
August 24th, 2009, 11:27 PM
Thanks, guys. The last two suggestions came too late. The story has already been written and published. If you want a copy in .pdf form, I would be happy to send you one. Just drop me a line at jamesthornton1@comcast. net (jamesthornton1@comcast.%20net)

Just mention you want the Men's Health story on masters swimming.

I will keep the new info in mind if I get a new story assignment related to swimming.