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chefster
June 24th, 2009, 10:22 AM
I was just wondering;
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/contribute/sn/persona?User=mustangchef&plckPersonaPage=BlogViewPost&plckUserId=mustangchef&plckPostId=Blog%3amustangchefPost%3a7581ebf5-f4f8-42c8-b93d-4764ad47f62b&plckController=PersonaBlog&plckScript=personaScript&plckElementId=personaDest

geochuck
June 24th, 2009, 10:56 AM
I am a non believer in Sun Block. I was exposed to sunlight for many years. I never used a protector and still do not use blockers. I take my sun in the mornings and late afternoon until I build up a tan then I sun all day long as my skin color is changed to tan rather then a burn.

Chris Stevenson
June 24th, 2009, 03:43 PM
I am a non believer in Sun Block.

And I'm not a big fan of skin cancer. To each his own.

chaos
June 24th, 2009, 03:49 PM
And I'm not a big fan of skin cancer. To each his own.

i'm not one to subscribe to every conspiracy theory out there (peanut gallery comments here) but; the jury is still out on weather exposure to the chemicals contained in many sunblock products isn't also harmful..... and to what degree.

Chris Stevenson
June 24th, 2009, 05:19 PM
i'm not one to subscribe to every conspiracy theory out there (peanut gallery comments here) but; the jury is still out on weather exposure to the chemicals contained in many sunblock products isn't also harmful..... and to what degree.

Perhaps, and I'm sure they could be safer. But the jury has long ago returned a verdict on the long-term exposure to UV rays in sunlight.

Chlorination by-products in drinking water and swimming pools -- trihalomethanes such as chloroform, for example -- are not very healthy either. And while there are ways to disinfect water that lead to fewer/better DBPs, chlorination sure beats the alternative of unsanitary water.

My own favorite sunblock is: (a) shade and (b) clothes. But when I have to be out there, I'll use the lotion too.

orca1946
June 24th, 2009, 06:36 PM
These "age spots" frpm sun damage should curtain my sun tannig, but istill enjoy the sun. Hte chemicals must be in very small amounts .

pwb
June 24th, 2009, 07:40 PM
I am a non believer in Sun Block. I was exposed to sunlight for many years. I never used a protector and still do not use blockers. I take my sun in the mornings and late afternoon until I build up a tan then I sun all day long as my skin color is changed to tan rather then a burn.

Uhhh ... Vancouver & sun ??

geochuck
June 24th, 2009, 07:48 PM
I do spend 5 to 6 Months in Mexico.

KEWebb18
June 24th, 2009, 09:02 PM
Chlorination by-products in drinking water and swimming pools -- trihalomethanes such as chloroform, for example -- are not very healthy either. And while there are ways to disinfect water that lead to fewer/better DBPs, chlorination sure beats the alternative of unsanitary water.

I'll take the chemistry professor's word on this one :)

fanstone
June 24th, 2009, 09:38 PM
I do it George's way. Maybe sometimes put on sunscreen the third day, or alternate days, when at the beach. I always have a tan anyways from being out in the sun running or swimming all year along. BUT, if George ever gets anything from his sun exposure, I can assure you he will die first of old age, not of the disease itself.

chefster
June 24th, 2009, 10:08 PM
Lol...lol..man i wish i had the time and money to party with you people.

chefster
June 24th, 2009, 10:22 PM
Uhhh ... Vancouver & sun ??
okay, maybe its just me , but I laugh everytime I read this. Sooo funny

ALM
June 24th, 2009, 10:28 PM
Not all sunscreens contain nanoparticles.

You can check your brand here:

http://www.nanotechproject.org/

Select "Inventories"
Select "Consumer Products"
Select "Browse"
Select "Sunscreen"

chaos
June 24th, 2009, 11:03 PM
Not all sunscreens contain nanoparticles.

You can check your brand here:

http://www.nanotechproject.org/

Select "Inventories"
Select "Consumer Products"
Select "Browse"
Select "Sunscreen"

great link!

ourswimmer
June 25th, 2009, 10:33 AM
Not all sunscreens contain nanoparticles.

You can check your brand here:

http://www.nanotechproject.org/

Select "Inventories"
Select "Consumer Products"
Select "Browse"
Select "Sunscreen"

What gets a sunblock on this list seems to be its use of "micronized" zinc oxide to provide physical screening from the sun without turning the wearer Casper-white. Other sunblocks use chemicals that react to UV light, basically absorbing it so that it does not affect the skin. Some use both to cover all bases.

I find the physical sunblocks much more effective, myself, and I am more afraid of melanoma and even just of ugly but non-deadly brown patches on my skin than I am of sunblock chemistry. I do swim in the early AM with sunblock on only my face, not my body, under the theory of balancing my wish to avoid unsightly brown spots against my need to make sure I get enough Vitamin D.

knelson
June 25th, 2009, 10:50 AM
Keep in mind UV radiation was significantly less 50 years ago due to higher levels of ozone in the atmosphere, so sunscreen may not have been as essential in the past.

geochuck
June 25th, 2009, 11:04 AM
Is being in the sunshine that bad. I have a friend who had a severe case of Psoriasis. After spending a couple of months in the sun in Mexico without protector on his Psoriasis would disappear. He would go back to BC in the summer and the Psoriasis would reappear

knelson
June 25th, 2009, 11:17 AM
Is being in the sunshine that bad.

No, I think it's awesome. It's getting a sunburn that's bad.

I'll admit it--I only use sunscreen at the beginning of the season when I'm still white. Once I get tan I don't use it, unless I'm going to be outside all day or something. I'm sure even this is probably not recommended, but I think the bad thing is getting burnt. I think some people go overboard with sunscreen. You do need to get some UV exposure to enable your body to synthesize vitamin D.

sydned
June 26th, 2009, 07:04 AM
My family history is rife with Melanoma and skin cancer issues, and have a skin issue that predisposes us to cancer risk. We are all riddled with little scars from times they've had to "check."

Fortunately, I'm from the side of the family that is more Eastern European, as opposed to my mom's "Irish" skin. I tan without trying, and have to wear at least 50+ to prevent the absorption. I can't seem to avoid tanning.

That being said, I just watched what my mom just went through applying topical chemotherapy to her nose last year, the second time in ten years. Blood, pain, and an open wound on her face for almost two months. And then not knowing if it's going to work?

Combine that with the malignant melanoma scar on her back and I'll take the sunblock please.

JimRude
June 26th, 2009, 12:24 PM
Just my :2cents: - YMMV.

My wife and I are in our mid 40s - grew up swimming, beaching, tanning and burning in CA in the 1970s and 1980s, back when a little baby oil and some Coppertone was all there was. Remember the sunburns when you could peel of layers of burnt skin from your nose and shoulders?

In the late 1980s I had the pleasure of getting to know Dr. Derek Cripps, one of the leaders in the field of skin cancer research, and a major player in the creation of the SPF system. He put the fear of god into me about UV exposure.

Fast forward to 2008, and my wife - who is quite freckly to begin with - visited her dermatologist, to be told that she had a stage II/III melanoma. Depending on the amount of recession, etc it might have already spread through her lymph system - a sentinel node biopsy was required.

Without going into the gory details, you can imagine how a mother of three young children might have handled the news that she had melanoma, and what the survival rates are if it has metastasized.

If you're smart, you will do all you can to keep yourself - and your loved ones - from getting too much UV exposure. Shade, clothing and sunscreen are all part of this.

aquageek
June 26th, 2009, 12:54 PM
My neighbor, the dermatologist, says he thanks all the people who are stupid enough to not wear sunscreen as they will pay for this three daughter's colleges, post grad work and marriages. I think I'll unfortunately be one of his best clients.

lefty
June 26th, 2009, 01:06 PM
Without going into the gory details, you can imagine how a mother of three young children might have handled the news that she had melanoma, and what the survival rates are if it has metastasized.

If you're smart, you will do all you can to keep yourself - and your loved ones - from getting too much UV exposure. Shade, clothing and sunscreen are all part of this.

I am glad that you posted this because I am sort of appalled that there are people saying that they are anti-sunscreen. George do you work for Big Sun?

geochuck
June 26th, 2009, 01:26 PM
I am sorry guys, I am a non user of UV protection, I guess I am lucky. I am a freckled guy but do my first days in the sun very graduale. It seems that I am one who has no problem. I know quite a few friends of that have problems with the sun. I do not say don't use protection, I just do not use it myself.

chaos
June 27th, 2009, 11:06 PM
the nanoparticle issue hasn't been touched in this thread at all. i think it is clear that many people have a well rehearsed response to the sunscreen question... and thats fine, but chefster posed a question regarding specific ingredients in many sunscreen products.
http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/core_product_safety/006259.html
i was in a pharmacy recently looking for zinc oxide and kept getting directed to the wall of sun care products. many included "clear zinc and titanium dioxide" ..... yes nano particles (in order to render them clear. all i wanted was a tube of plain old zinc oxide. there are other carcinogens in many sunscreens .... oxybenzone http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxybenzone

(its possible to be anti-toxic compound without being pro-melanoma)

Chicken of the Sea
June 28th, 2009, 12:58 AM
Geochuck.

you are lucky to be lucky.

I don't know anything about it but does it help to be "gradual" in ones exposure to UV or is it more an absolute exposure that counts (dependent on ones skin type etc)?

I always thought UV rays didn't know how quickly or slowly you absorbed them. I thought it was the amount, not the rate. Isn't it cumulative? I don't know.

All I know is America has nothing on Australia for skin cancer so Oz is probably the best place to look for guidance.

For at least 10 years school children in Australia haven't even been allowed out for recess without a very wide broad brimmed hat on. It'll be interesting to see the skin cancer rates for that generation compared to mine.

Now that I live in Chicago (negligable sun compared to Oz), I never let my kids outside without sunscreen. I hope it helps!

I personally use sunscreen all the time but already have so much damage from growing up on the beach in the 70's it's prbably a little too late...

Leonard Jansen
June 29th, 2009, 08:35 AM
FYI - I posted a review of a new sunscreen I just tried in the Open Water forum.

-LBJ

dwlovell
July 5th, 2009, 12:55 AM
And I'm not a big fan of skin cancer. To each his own.

Some studies are showing something like 1 in 30 are prone to the skin cancer that the sunblocks will prevents (not all melanoma is even blockable using lotions), while the other 29 of those 30 people are developing vitamin D deficiencies due to blocking the sun's rays, causing a range of problems from depression to earlier onset of osteopherosis.

While I don't suggest tanning or excessive pool/beach use without some kind of SPF lotion (or sunblock if you have risk factors for skin cancer), the recommendations by some to wear sunblock any time you are in the sun is turning out to be likely unhealthy for you.

Here are a few articles about this, I cannot find the original one that I read tho.
http://www.nst.com.my/Saturday/National/2552507/Article
http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/depression.shtml