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gobears
July 1st, 2009, 01:52 PM
I've been trying to beat what should be a minor bout of bursitis in my shoulder due to an un-swimming-related activity about 3 weeks ago. It was initially so stiff I had problems raising my arm to the side without pain. Now, after active rest and a little bit of swimming with fins, I can lift my arm fine but I have twinges when I move it certain ways. The funny thing is that it really bugged me a couple of days ago after I had sat at a swim meet the previous day without using it at all.

I'm beginning to wonder if I should try ART but am afraid of all things chiropractor-related after a few lame experiences with different DC's. Is there such a thing as only needing one or two ART treatments or am I likely going to be given the hard-sell to be treated three times a week for the next three months? The only providers are 30+ minutes away in traffic and I'm not sure I want to drag 3 kids with me to a bunch of appointments. Any thoughts???

The Fortress
July 1st, 2009, 05:25 PM
I've been trying to beat what should be a minor bout of bursitis in my shoulder due to an un-swimming-related activity about 3 weeks ago. It was initially so stiff I had problems raising my arm to the side without pain. Now, after active rest and a little bit of swimming with fins, I can lift my arm fine but I have twinges when I move it certain ways. The funny thing is that it really bugged me a couple of days ago after I had sat at a swim meet the previous day without using it at all.

I'm beginning to wonder if I should try ART but am afraid of all things chiropractor-related after a few lame experiences with different DC's. Is there such a thing as only needing one or two ART treatments or am I likely going to be given the hard-sell to be treated three times a week for the next three months? The only providers are 30+ minutes away in traffic and I'm not sure I want to drag 3 kids with me to a bunch of appointments. Any thoughts???

I asked my ART doc this question today. He thought that only someone in acute pain or prepping/fine tuning for a major competition would come in 3x per week. He said a case of bursitis should, with a skilled provider, show substantial improvement going 2x week for 3 week or 6 sessions. You must have someone who is experienced and knows what they're doing though.

Oh, my shoulder always bothers me more when I'm inactive!

gobears
July 1st, 2009, 05:59 PM
Thanks, Fort. I looked the guy I'm thinking about seeing up on the ART provider site. He specializes in upper extremities and Ironman competitors so he should be good, I would think...

Thanks for asking your doc! I guess it can't hurt to go once and see what they say, huh?

The Fortress
July 1st, 2009, 07:06 PM
Thanks, Fort. I looked the guy I'm thinking about seeing up on the ART provider site. He specializes in upper extremities and Ironman competitors so he should be good, I would think...

Thanks for asking your doc! I guess it can't hurt to go once and see what they say, huh?

Nope, can't hurt. My doc likewise has many elite runners and triathletes as patients. I can't imagine seeing someone who didn't treat athletes. But perhaps we're some of the ones that benefit most from ART?

ALM
July 1st, 2009, 11:24 PM
My ART guy (a chiropractor and sometime Masters swimmer) does NOT want to see his patients repeatedly. He is way too busy. Just a few sessions is all you'll probably need to do.

One tip - when you do an ART session, don't plan on doing anything athletic for the rest of that day and maybe even part or all of the next day. I made this mistake once - swam in the evening after an ART session. My muscles tightened up and pretty much "undid" the treatment.

Anna Lea

gobears
July 2nd, 2009, 09:46 AM
My ART guy (a chiropractor and sometime Masters swimmer) does NOT want to see his patients repeatedly. He is way too busy. Just a few sessions is all you'll probably need to do.

One tip - when you do an ART session, don't plan on doing anything athletic for the rest of that day and maybe even part or all of the next day. I made this mistake once - swam in the evening after an ART session. My muscles tightened up and pretty much "undid" the treatment.

Anna Lea

OK, thanks--I'll keep that in mind...:)

Chris Stevenson
July 2nd, 2009, 09:52 AM
So...according to all-acronyms.com there are 169 usages of the acronym ART, 57 of them medical. Out of moribd curiosity, what are you all talking about here and what is involved?

The Fortress
July 2nd, 2009, 10:02 AM
My ART guy (a chiropractor and sometime Masters swimmer) does NOT want to see his patients repeatedly. He is way too busy. Just a few sessions is all you'll probably need to do.

One tip - when you do an ART session, don't plan on doing anything athletic for the rest of that day and maybe even part or all of the next day. I made this mistake once - swam in the evening after an ART session. My muscles tightened up and pretty much "undid" the treatment.

Anna Lea

Definitely agree! (Although, if your ART doc is focusing on the shoulders, running is probably fine.)

Chris,

We're talking about active release therapy, http://www.activerelease.com/

letsrace
July 2nd, 2009, 01:54 PM
Awwww. I guess I will put away my canvas and brushes.

qbrain
July 2nd, 2009, 07:19 PM
Awwww. I guess I will put away my canvas and brushes.

Fort totally ruined a couple dozen creative posts.

sydned
July 2nd, 2009, 07:54 PM
My ART practitioner is known at our house by the initials MW, for Miracle Worker. She has done things for both my husband and I that no regular chiropractor, or any kind of doctor, was able to do--and many of my teammates have begun going to her. (I hesitate to tell people about her lest she lose time for me!)

I also love and appreciate the fact that the system is so different--decidedly NOT the visit 3x a week thing I was accustomed to. I have a problem, she fixes it, I move on and call when the next issue arises.

I heart her.