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View Full Version : Different pools, different difficulties?



tygrr94
July 8th, 2009, 05:05 PM
Hi all,
All winter I have been swimming in an indoor 25m pool. I have build up from about 2000 to 4000m per workout over the course of 4 months (April-now). So this summer I found an outdoor pool which I swim in from 6-7:30 pm. I think the water is cooler than the indoor pool, and there are no lane ropes that cut down on turbulence (though there are very few people swimming laps there at this time). I do tend to go to the indoor pool about an hour or so earlier because of the crowd and because the outdoor pool has all-lap-swimmers at that time. But that shouldn't affect anything.

The problem is that I always lack motivation and I have *yet* to finish a workout in this pool--for example, yesterday I was supposed to swim 3800m but only swam 1250 before I got tired and actually quit--and I've done this every time in that pool. I tried swimming the indoor pool the other day to test, and I swam the whole workout--4000m--without issue.

What's the problem? Is it the water temp, the turbulence, both, neither, or something else? Or could it be mental? I love the outdoor swimming idea but if I can't swim my workout, I don't know how to fix it.

Suggestions?

:yawn:

~Wren~
July 8th, 2009, 05:27 PM
I'm in the same situation. Indoors I'm great, but in the outdoor pool . . . if it's not coached, I'm not finishing. :blush: Maybe it's the novelty of being outside (I'm in MN) that is too distracting? I always feel like I'm somewhere else when I'm out there. Our indoor pool is SO boring and uninspiring that there's really nothing else to think about except my workout. LOL

jakeman81
July 8th, 2009, 07:04 PM
Yes, I'm in the same boat. I swim at a pool that is much colder, then my other pool that I swim at is much warmer. I lack motivation to train at the warmer pool. I can also add that I swim at the colder pool 3/4 of the year. It feels to me that the warmness makes me just want to go slow and sluggish.

I dunno, I dont like training at the warm pool. I also find it much harder to train in the warmer one too.

stillwater
July 8th, 2009, 08:45 PM
I need a coach or I have motivation problems, regardless of the water temp.

jakeman81
July 8th, 2009, 09:20 PM
I need a coach or I have motivation problems, regardless of the water temp.

This too.

KEWebb18
July 8th, 2009, 09:29 PM
I had a similar problem when I first started running (by myself), and also when I got back into the pool. I like to be around other folks.

When I started running, I could not run longer than 20 minutes at a time. So I asked my brother-in-law who is an experienced runner and he told me not to wear a watch, and just run. It was easier to think about running instead of what I had to do and how long I had to go. Maybe instead of going in when the "I have to get in x amount of yards" go in with "I am going to swim and relax".

When I am swimming solo and feel like getting out, I just said to myself--how will not finishing this practice affect me? Will I look back on my season and say "I trained as hard as I possibly could" or will there be those days that I slacked off. That is the serious way to do it.
Maybe if you break it down into smaller segments--instead of having in mind this whole practice that you want to finish, then put a goal for each set--a time, a distance, whatever.

However, getting out is much easier when I am uncomfortable due to pool/air temperature.

Hope this helps...

tygrr94
July 8th, 2009, 10:54 PM
I'm in the same situation. Indoors I'm great, but in the outdoor pool . . . if it's not coached, I'm not finishing. :blush: Maybe it's the novelty of being outside (I'm in MN) that is too distracting? I always feel like I'm somewhere else when I'm out there. Our indoor pool is SO boring and uninspiring that there's really nothing else to think about except my workout. LOL

I think that may be part of it...the novelty of being outside. I want to see what's going on, the sun is always out, 10 other things are on my mind (like getting a tan & reading, lol)...but at the indoor pool, I don't care about any of that. None of my workouts are coached since I'm not swimming with the team right now (in school & working full time so no time for their late-evening practices)....so it's hard to maintain focus outdoors. The team I swim with (when I do swim w/them) does practice outside in the summer for the majority of their practices, so really I have no excuse.

tygrr94
July 8th, 2009, 10:57 PM
However, getting out is much easier when I am uncomfortable due to pool/air temperature.

Hmmm, that may be part of it...I always make excuses (The pool is too cold, my fingers are numb, my stomach hurts, I have a split toe...) whatever. LOL

Redbird Alum
July 9th, 2009, 03:59 PM
Maybe you're wearing out because you don't get to do a turn every 25m? The pushoff alone cuts way down on the number of strokes per 100m. (Not that I'm suggesting you love turns, mind you...)

orca1946
July 9th, 2009, 04:35 PM
Maybe you need a talk :blah:with yourself. OK self if we are going to improve , we need to challenge ourselves. So ,let's forget about that wimpy 25 pool & work the entire lap in the BIG pool !!!:applaud:

nkfrench
July 9th, 2009, 08:36 PM
My workouts are best if the other people in the pool are swimming for exercise, not just splashing around or socializing or noodling (or all 3).

The first few times I ever swam long course I was daunted by how long it seemed and I really missed having turns to rest on.

Turbulence demotivates me. I don't like swimming in chop whether it's due to lack of lane lines, butterfliers, people diving/jumping in. It makes it harder to feel the water and it kills my speed.

If conditions are otherwise sub-optimal it also clobbers my motivation. Temperatures, water taste, wind/rain, being hungry, swimsuits or equipment that acts up, interference from other swimmers, funny water currents, odors, you name it. I also don't like swimming backstroke outdoors especially if there are no lane ropes.

FindingMyInnerFish
July 9th, 2009, 10:28 PM
My workouts are best if the other people in the pool are swimming for exercise, not just splashing around or socializing or noodling (or all 3).

The first few times I ever swam long course I was daunted by how long it seemed and I really missed having turns to rest on.

Turbulence demotivates me. I don't like swimming in chop whether it's due to lack of lane lines, butterfliers, people diving/jumping in. It makes it harder to feel the water and it kills my speed.

If conditions are otherwise sub-optimal it also clobbers my motivation. Temperatures, water taste, wind/rain, being hungry, swimsuits or equipment that acts up, interference from other swimmers, funny water currents, odors, you name it. I also don't like swimming backstroke outdoors especially if there are no lane ropes.

I don't live near a 50m pool although I've gone to some meets held in one (not really convenient to travel there on a regular basis). The first time I did a meet in the LCM pool, it felt really strange... did a 50 freestyle as my first event and it felt like I'd never finish! I kept thinking, "who stretched this pool?" :)

Mostly, I swim in a 25 yard pool, but I can relate to the part about no lane lines. Even if others are swimming laps, the boundaries are less defined. During the mid-day lap swim period at my Y, there's only a single lane line to divide the pool in half, because many during that period want to just do water walking or chit chatting. The lap swimmers take the other side, and although we're pretty careful about circling and such, it still is harder to focus if the pool gets crowded.

I don't even like swimming backstroke indoors, but outdoors, I can imagine two major issues: no line on the ceiling to follow (more or less) and (on bright days) sun glare, which I doubt even tinted goggles can adequately correct.

ddl
July 10th, 2009, 12:30 AM
I don't know about outdoor, but I do find that swimming in a 50m pool which is also wider seems harder than a 25m one. The water doesn't seem so "tame". Perhaps it's because the lane lines are further apart from each other thus more turbulence? Prior to my recent vacation I made a plan to practice longer distance in a 50m pool and was very excited about it, but as soon as I was in the pool, the feelings were completely unexpected, swimming was hard (partly due to the pumps), and I barely swam for 20 minutes before I got out. Not to mention that I had wanted to show off to some people about my swimming progress! In the following swims in that pool I think I never swam for more than half hour. When I returned to the 25 yard pool, my swim returned to "normal"; how I wish the people whom I wanted to show off to were here! :shakeshead:

Ripple
July 10th, 2009, 09:20 AM
Swimming in a 50m pool is humbling, all right. I've been doing it once a week for the last three months and my stroke count is only just starting to come down to where I think it should be.
One day when I got there they didn't have the lane ropes up and I had two near-collisions with a fellow who decided to swim cross-wise, since he wasn't strong enough to go 50 meters. (There were 25m lanes available in the other pool that he could have used.) Finishing another lap that same day, I emerged to find a teenage boy wearing my paddles at the end of the lane. Now I only go when I can be sure it will be set up for actual swimming, with actual lane ropes.

swimcat
July 10th, 2009, 09:41 AM
for me different pools make a difference. i am a better long course swimmer.(less turns). well ok, on im or breasstroke sc is preferable
however, if the temp is 2 degrees warmer or the chemicals are off, i am miserable. i used to swim outdoors and have been in for about 2 1/2. if about killed me at first.

Bobinator
July 10th, 2009, 09:59 AM
Be patient with yourself and build up gradually.
Tomorrow head to the lcm with a 2,000 meter workout in hand and finish it.
If that goes well do it again the next time.
Gradually add meterage to your total and before you know it you will be okay.
I have heard some great swimmers say in their blogs that they do no more than 3 lcm workouts a week because it really wears them down. If you are swimming fast that could be true for you.
Once you get used to lcm you will love it. I feel like a REAL swimmer in a long course pool, sometimes I feel like a ping-pong ball in short course yards. :agree:

nkfrench
July 10th, 2009, 04:54 PM
I don't even like swimming backstroke indoors, but outdoors, I can imagine two major issues: no line on the ceiling to follow (more or less) and (on bright days) sun glare, which I doubt even tinted goggles can adequately correct.

There are some concrete peninsulas and ladders in one outdoor pool I swim at that project into the outside lanes. They really hurt if you swim right into them. Even if you can go straight, the other backstrokers in your area may still run into you.

bamueller
July 10th, 2009, 07:31 PM
I have the same issues. I could swear that my outdoor pool is a few feet longer than 25 yards b/c I tend not to make all my sets like I do indoors. I think I just don't have the same motivation w/o my lane buddies and coach pushing me.

So, admitting this, I tend to work on other things when outdoors, like kicking, drills, or distance. Instead of frustrating myself with 20 100s on a fast pace, I might do 20 100s on a slightly slower pace, giving myself more rest. Just get the yardage it, even if its ugly.

frankiej
July 10th, 2009, 08:41 PM
I find the beginning of my workout to be the harshest regardless of the pool. Like I struggle to do my slow 35 sec 50m. Water being cold just takes the air out of my lungs.

By the end I can easily do what drills at the beginning gave me trouble.

nhc
June 2nd, 2010, 06:18 PM
According to Archimedes' principle, buoyancy has nothing to do with the depth of the pool. But when I swam in a 50m pool, which is not only larger but also deeper than a 25y pool, I felt more buoyant, but at the same time it took more strength to move forward. It seems as if the huge volume of the water body (the entire pool) surrounding me has an impact? It's a little intimidating to see the vast pool bottom during a lap, especially near the ends where the bottom slopes to deeper.

Muppet
June 3rd, 2010, 02:26 PM
What pools are you referring to? I'm in the same area as you, and may have some insight on a particular pool...

Are you training for anything in particular (meet, triathlon, OW swim, weight loss, etc.)? If not, I would recommend you set some finite goals. It is hard to train by yourself, but if you're having a rough time either getting to or actually swimming at the pool, having a goal like that will help you through the rough patches.

Personally, telling myself things like "[such-and-such race] isn't going to swim itself" and "you need to work off those 10 cookies you ate last night" help encourage me to make time to swim and to keep plugging away while I'm there.

Also, if you're not using Go-The-Distance, check that out. Seeing the workouts you do (or don't do) in a calendar and getting total mileage is a great motivator, especially if you're not interested in meets or OW races. Simple goals based purely on mileage in the pool or days in the pool will help get you back on track!