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humanpunchingbag
July 12th, 2009, 12:51 PM
I have noticed that some (many?) of you swimmers have the opportunity to train with age-group swimmers. How did you manage to arrange that?

I typically train early mornings (5:30, as soon as the pool opens). The local Masters club only trains in the evenings while I am still at work, so the majority of my sessions are solo, trained in the "public lanes". This works out fairly well; I am a fast enough swimmer that I usually end up with my own lane or sharing with other like-minded people. The problem is that, left to my own devices, my work-outs are all about the same. Same times, same strokes, same distance. I always go about 4000 to 4500 meters, one half swim, one quarter kick, one quarter pull. I do some sprints and tons of traditional short-rest interval training. Ho hummmmm...

It would be nice to periodically (or routinelly) swim with the age-group swimmers of my speed calibre, but I just cannot see how to arrange that without coming across as just plain kooky (and not in a good kooky way either) Maybe it is just the very traditional, old fashioned culture in this area that makes this difficult.

As an example: I once asked why the masters swimmers do not share swim meets with the age group swimmers more often to defray the costs of pool rental and increase the number of paying competitors. The major answer was that many parents do not want a bunch of "dirty old men" warming up in the same pool as their young impressionable daughters. This took me aback: at the time my daughter was a competitive swimmer and I just could not fathom that anyone could have such a dirty mind that they could imagine anything sexual happening in a crowded warm-up pool.

For the swimmers that have the opportunity to swim with age group teams: was this opportunity offered-up voluntarily by the club, or did you have to campaign the club to allow you to join as a master swimmer?

agingpentathlete
July 12th, 2009, 01:42 PM
Our age-group club welcomes masters swimmers to swim with the age-group swimmers. Depending on your level, you may end up in a lane with 8 year olds, or you might find yourself with 17 year olds. At our local club - once you put on a swim-suit, you are just like everybody else.

My best advice would be just to talk to the coach, voice your concern, and tell him your motive. Some snooty parents might look at you funny during the first workout, but give it a week, and the lanes will seem strange without you, should you miss a practice.

tjrpatt
July 12th, 2009, 01:53 PM
I train with my former age group club every once in a while but it is only because the same head coach is there. I tried swimming with the age group club at my Y and the head coach said no. Find out what local age group clubs are in the area and talk with the head coach or something. Plus, they might have better training hours that are more accomodating to your working schedule. Maybe they have a 5:30 workout, just as an example. Some Masters swimmer just train with an age group club.

Chris Stevenson
July 12th, 2009, 02:00 PM
I have noticed that some (many?) of you swimmers have the opportunity to train with age-group swimmers. How did you manage to arrange that?

I think the number of masters swimmers who do this is fairly small, but it does happen.

I have trained with 3 different age group clubs and 2 of them did not end very well.

In one case, I was living in Knoxville, TN and there was no masters swim team. Me and one other masters swimmer practiced with an age-group team. The swimmers didn't seem to mind and the coach liked it a lot. But after about one year, some parents complained because we did not pay the full team rate (we also didn't swim at all the practices; our fees were essentially prorated). We were given the option of paying the full team fees, or leaving. We left.

In another case, here in Richmond, I was swimming with the Poseidon team and everything was okay for a little while. But the team was renting the pool from a health club (of which I was a member) and the club was concerned about insurance/liability because the team practice began at 4:45am, before the health club opened. I offered to join USS as a member of the team, and I told the coach I would be willing to pay a reasonable rate based on the number of practices I swam. But the health club was pretty adamant, and the team didn't want to make waves with them b/c their relations have been strained enough.

The team I swim with now (NOVA) started a masters group of their own initiative. They own the pool they practice at. After seeing me swim, the coach invited me to participate in their age-group workouts whenever I wished because he thought it would be inspiring to the kids. That's the situation as it stands. I prefer to train with the masters group almost exclusively, but during the hard training part of my season I probably swim with the age-groupers once/week and I always try to ask first b/c I don't want to contribute to overcrowding.

I am always acutely aware that it is all about the kids. I always choose the least crowded lane and I try not to ever put myself in a position where I slow down or otherwise negatively impact the practice of an age-grouper. I should point out that the coaches, however, are uniformly VERY positive and encouraging about swimming in the pratices. I have never heard complaints from parents either. The swimmers are either indifferent (a few) or supportive and friendly (the majority). Sometimes one will ask when I'm going to practice with them again.

About meets: I have heard from a reliable source that the concern you describe about "dirty old men" has been voiced here in the US as well. But I have never experienced this attitude directly either in practices or meets. I have swum in quite a number of USS meets with nothing but overwhelmingly positive feedback. I know of others around here who have had similar experiences, including masters swimmers who have had the pleasure of competing with their sons and daughters.

Bottom line: I think that swimming with an age-group club depends very strongly on the circumstances. I hope this helps.

nkfrench
July 12th, 2009, 09:20 PM
I've heard the "dirty old men" comment at our local club as well. Some of the swim moms have too much time on their hands.

Some of our adult swimmers will ask the head coach for permission to swim with the elite USAS group if they can make the sets. Generally they are not getting sufficient quality of training swimming the coached Masters workouts, or their schedule conflicts with the USMS practices. Some are fast enough to focus on higher-caliber USAS and FINA meets. Anybody doing these workouts is probably focused on survival. The swim moms so worried about their "impressionable young daughters" probably could use a reality check and stick to worrying about the other teenagers.

Slower adult swimmers do not swim with the age group kids. They stick to the Masters practices. If there is lanespace but no masters coach, they can swim uncoached in an empty lane but don't share a lane with the kids.

In our LSC any meet offering competion for 15-16 year olds must allow any older USAS-registered swimmer to compete as long as they have the qualifying time standards (unless it is a Junior meet for 18&Under). Typically timelines are a problem so it is not typical for slower USMS swimmers to dual-register and make the meets even longer.

chaos
July 12th, 2009, 10:04 PM
In another case, here in Richmond, I was swimming with the Poseidon team and everything was okay for a little while. But the team was renting the pool from a health club (of which I was a member) and the club was concerned about insurance/liability because the team practice began at 4:45am, before the health club opened.

usms members are insured as participants in usas practices.

humanpunchingbag
July 12th, 2009, 10:21 PM
Great Replies. One can only ask I guess.

Mr. Stevenson: I checked your blog out and I checked out some of your incredible performances. I rather doubt that you obstruct many age group athletes. I suspect that you embarass many, challenge most, and a select few bask in the glory of beating you once in a while. Even these days, with the new turns and the new suits, very few swimmers are going 2:06 and change for a 200 meter back. I know that there is not even one age-group swimmer in the province of Saskatchewan that can go sub 2:08 for a 200 back. You, sir, are no slouch.

Chris Stevenson
July 13th, 2009, 09:30 AM
usms members are insured as participants in usas practices.

This was brought up to the health club. It didn't matter to them. Their club, their rules, they just didn't like me swimming there before the club opened to regular members.

It all worked out in the end, I think I am happier in my current situation than I would have been in that one.


I rather doubt that you obstruct many age group athletes. I suspect that you embarass many, challenge most, and a select few bask in the glory of beating you once in a while.

Thank you for the kind words. The age group team I occasionally swim with now (NOVA of Virginia) is a real powerhouse, though; I saw that they recently did a "virtual national championship" of club teams in the USA, and NOVA was in the top five. They have girls faster than me in freestyle and butterfly; one of them just crushed me in a 2-mile OW swim.

qbrain
July 13th, 2009, 10:09 AM
After seeing me swim, the coach invited me to participate in their age-group workouts whenever I wished because he thought it would be inspiring to the kids.

If I had a nickle every time this happened to me... I would be flat broke.

My thought is to see if you can get some like minded swimmers together and start a masters team.

As for more competition, joining USAS and participating in their meets sounds like a solid idea, and I am planning on doing so starting in the fall.

swimshark
July 13th, 2009, 10:10 AM
I moved to my area 3 years ago and started working out pretty much on my own with an occasional "coach" in the water. Then one day I started talking to one of the age group coaches and he invited me to join him. I did so soon after that and really enjoyed working hard with kids who were a lot younger. I was prorated in my payments as well since I was not swimming as often as they were. Sadly when a new coach came in he told me that I was "taking up lane space" (due to not paying as much). I have now joined a new team and am enjoying getting to know a whole new group of kids. Rarely does my age (38) come in to play with the kids and I am usually treated like one of them. But, being a female I don't get the "dirty old man" issue. I am the only adult on the team that practices in my pool so I don't know how they would feel about a male being there. Oh and I am now no long prorated so no one can tell me I'm taking up lane space any more :applaud:

As for doing it periodically, I don't know how many teams would go for that. I know my coach expects us to be there 4-5 mornings a week and the kids to do doubles (I have a 4 year old so he understand that I can't come in the afternoons). I'd ask the local team if you could join them but make sure you are ready to jump in fully, not half way.

SLOmmafan
July 13th, 2009, 12:40 PM
I occasionally swim the the age-group teams that works out at the local health club I swim masters at too. They are allotted a certain amount of lanes but tend to spill over if the pool is not to crowded. Their coach is always encouraging me to swim with the team (especially if they are using lanes not under contract to use) and I am well received by young swimmers.

mctrusty
July 13th, 2009, 12:44 PM
Good discussion.

The USS coach here invited me to swim with the kids several times before I actually jumped in and swam with them. Their practices often coincide or come after our USMS practices and I guess I looked like I wanted to swim more. I declined for a while because I was unsure about a.) being perceived as the dirty old man and b.) getting my butt handed to me.

Fortunately, there are a couple of dads that swim with the USS team sometimes. 1 guy, a master's swimmer, actually does their workouts a couple times a week and the other guy just swims on his own while his son is swimming, in a lane next to the kids' lanes. So that did a lot to alleviate fears related to (a.) above. I usually get in ~1 practice a week with them now.

WRT dual-sanction meets: there are a couple of coaches around here who do set up dual-sanction meets in this area. I try to support those as much as I can because I think it is a great opportunity to open up some more meet options for USMS here. I've always had a great experience with these meets, the kids have been very nice, and I've never gotten any dirty looks from disapproving parents. Just some ribbing from my wife. But she calls me old man all of the time.

If there is a team there that you're interested in practicing with, talk to the coach. If they work out at the same time, you might just start BS'ing with them about swimming and general and get to know them a bit before you broach the subject of practicing with the team. Or approach them about organizing a master's team.

knelson
July 13th, 2009, 02:31 PM
The swim moms so worried about their "impressionable young daughters" probably could use a reality check and stick to worrying about the other teenagers.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking. The teenaged boys in the workouts are just as "dirty" as any adult. The only difference is there's actually the possibility that the boys will date their daughters! If any adult swimming with age groupers did anything even remotely inappropriate I'm pretty sure the'd be tossed out on their butt very quickly.

Since my current masters team seems unlikely to continue past the summer I've been thinking about where I'll swim next. I've been looking at USA Swimming clubs as a possibility. One thing that concerns me, though, is they are much more expensive.

swimmj
July 13th, 2009, 03:36 PM
Our masters team is under the umbrella of an organization with an age group team. Before there was a masters team, a few people worked out with the kids team - one of them had kids on the team. Now that we have a masters team, most folks work out with the masters, but sometimes the kids have a Saturday practice when masters does not, and we are welcome to join the kids practice as long as there is lane space. Many of the age group team parents are masters swimmers and we let some age group swimmers swim our workouts if they need to (have to miss an afternoon practice or want to do doubles). The key is having coaches who understand the needs of both groups and a willingness to make things work. I've swam with the kids and in general, they are pretty positive about having older swimmers in the pool with them. I also coach the age groupers and I don't think it hurts at all for them to see me apply myself in a practice.

--mj

Swimmy83843
July 13th, 2009, 04:40 PM
I'm lucky enough to be able to swim with the age group team. I help out coaching the younger kids, but I swim a couple of nights a week and on saturdays with the high school age groups. I mentioned once to the coach about not getting enough long/hard sets with masters. He invited me to swim with them. The kids have been great with it. There is teasing and a bunch of 'old man' coming from them, but I know they don't like getting beat by me. There was a guy at the last meet that was my age, 38, and they were teasing me because I was not swimming in it. I will probably dual register next summer and swim in some meets with them.

CreamPuff
July 13th, 2009, 05:32 PM
Yeah, that's what I was thinking. The teenaged boys in the workouts are just as "dirty" as any adult.

LOL! I've had zero problems with the teenage boys I swim with on my USA-S team. Some of them even go out of their way to be courteous to me - both on the deck and during sets. I'm not complaining. Now. . . I can't say I have had zero problems with the masters men. . . :angel:

CreamPuff
July 13th, 2009, 06:05 PM
I have noticed that some (many?) of you swimmers have the opportunity to train with age-group swimmers. How did you manage to arrange that?

I got to know the club, the coaches, the swimmers and the masters program (swam on it for a few years) prior to asking about swimming with the kids. By the time I asked about it, I was told that "they would love to have me."

Some clubs and coaches are open to it and others are not.

I'm fortunate in that the head coach in my area (along with the rest of the coaches on his team) welcome adults who want to swim with the kids (and in total honesty, very few adults can hang with these kids). I've actually witnessed 20 to 30 something year old ex- Senior National top 8 finalists try and do a couple of practices with the SRI/ National team and not be able to do it. They did not return. So, if you can hang, you can work out a schedule with the coach. If you can't, you won't want to practice with them anyway. So it all really works itself out.

I would like to stress that I swam 6x/ week at 1.5 hours a pop for a few years (and mostly did distance sets coming in around 5,000 yds per practice) with masters prior to even thinking about swimming with the kids @ 2 hours a practice. Only when the masters practices felt EZ (and I could easily average 1:15 to 1:10 per hundred on free sets - and I would not be tired week after week), did I think about swimming with the kids. I think that as adults, we tend to think, oh what's another 30 minutes. But it is a HUGE difference b/c not only are you adding 30 more minutes, you need to remember that often the intervals are faster (it's more intense) and the kids don't die as easily as adults and they can really work the back half of sets/ races. PLUS, much of their 2 hours of swimming does not involve using equipment like paddles, buoys, and fins. Instead, there is more swim and more kick work.

I also pay the full price b/c I don't want anyone thinking I'm getting special treatment. However, compared to other sports I was in (triathlons for a short time), the price seems very reasonable. And I look at it as an investment in my health.

Can't comment on the dirty old man thing. I'd personally shop for another club if that's the kind of comments you've heard. Yuck.




The problem is that, left to my own devices, my work-outs are all about the same. Same times, same strokes, same distance. I always go about 4000 to 4500 meters, one half swim, one quarter kick, one quarter pull. I do some sprints and tons of traditional short-rest interval training. Ho hummmmm...
Same for me. Give me an inch and I'll take a mile. I needed/ wanted/ craved a more boot camp type workout. There is always something that not only challenges me but often shocks me during USA-S practices. :)



It would be nice to periodically (or routinelly) swim with the age-group swimmers of my speed calibre, but I just cannot see how to arrange that without coming across as just plain kooky (and not in a good kooky way either) Maybe it is just the very traditional, old fashioned culture in this area that makes this difficult.
I worried about being kooky for about 5 minutes. Change can be good.


For the swimmers that have the opportunity to swim with age group teams: was this opportunity offered-up voluntarily by the club, or did you have to campaign the club to allow you to join as a master swimmer? I knew that a couple of the masters men swam with the kids on occasion. So, I made sure to get myself in the best shape possible; proved myself in the pool during masters practices and meets; and then asked if I could join in. Then the hard work began. Although I must give credit to my coach for reigning me in and not allowing me to overdo it. He's made it clear I just don't recover like the kids. Ain't that the truth!

humanpunchingbag
July 13th, 2009, 10:14 PM
Same for me. Give me an inch and I'll take a mile. I needed/ wanted/ craved a more boot camp type workout. There is always something that not only challenges me but often shocks me during USA-S practices. :)



Funny thing is that I am not terribly worried about keeping up with the kids training. I know which group I would fit into (not the National Quaifiers: they are slightly faster than I for the most part) but the Junior National Team I would keep up with and bury most of them. Swimming is a poor cousin sport around here: hockey is the real religion. This is Canada after all. Any kid that shows Olympic potential ends up either at the national training center in Vancouver or Calgary.

I am terrified of trying to keep up with the kids doing kick. They do tons of kick around here and that is something I just cannot do. My feet move, so do my legs. Really fast. Its my body that stays in place. All I can say is thank God I have tremendously powerful arms and bullet-proof shoulders. I can just see me getting the nick-name "road-kill" after the first kick session.

All the coaches know me around here; think small community, then get out the microscope so you can see my community. Swimming is tiny here: they cannot even hold a swim meet without every official from all the local cities and towns turning up. I am one of the perrenial "stroke and turn" guys that officiates at least one session at every meet. Furthermore, at 5:30 in the morning all the coaches notice the old grey fart doing 4500 meters of low rest reps over in the public lanes.

One of my issues is that my daughter's departure from competitive swimming was nothing short of incendiary. There was a boy on her team, he was offended when she dumped him, violent threats were made and things went downhill from there. Most of the local swim families followed the spectacular soap opera that ensued and now just about all the swim community takes a wide berth to avoid dealing with my daughter and I. The silence was deafening back when my daughter would come and train with me in the early mornings when she thought she might still take a run at competing.

CreamPuff
July 13th, 2009, 10:31 PM
Funny thing is that I am not terribly worried about keeping up with the kids training. I know which group I would fit into (not the National Quaifiers: they are slightly faster than I for the most part) but the Junior National Team I would keep up with and bury most of them.

Then no worries! The only additional thing I can add that I noticed for myself is that my beating certain kids in competition did not necessarily equate to my being able to do what they do in practices. . . Competing and training USA-S are two different animals IMO.



I am terrified of trying to keep up with the kids doing kick. They do tons of kick around here and that is something I just cannot do.

I'm happy to say this *was* my situation as well. For the first year I trained distance (did a 25K OW), so we did not do much kick. After that I switched to mid distance and became *road kill* for a while (we did LOTS of kicking) until I got sick of almost being lapped all the time. I fixed it and I now have a kick. Still working on making it better but I swim much faster now with a kick. I never learned how to kick as a kid but finally have added it in as an adult. It's awesome. Watch out for kick/ swim sets as well - things like 8x150 with 50 kick/ 100 swim free on fast intervals. Very tough because you must kick fast on the 50 kick and then the real test comes into play during the 100 FR swim (your heart rate is already higher from the kick part) b/c you must then do a 6 beat kick and fast pull on the swim to make that interval! You can really see who can and cannot kick during these test sets. At my USA-S practices, you MUST learn to kick.
If ya can't kick. . . you'll want to quit. . .


. . . the swim community takes a wide berth to avoid dealing with my daughter and I. The silence was deafening back when my daughter would come and train with me in the early mornings when she thought she might still take a run at competing. No one's perfect. I've seen people forgive and forget over time. Sorry that happened to you. Must have been hard on your daughter and you.

aquageek
July 14th, 2009, 09:29 AM
Personally, if you can train with appropriately aged kids, you should go for it. Puff and Chris are studs and can hang with the heavy hitters. Unfortunately for me, I max out at about our 13/14 year old teams and would be quite uncomfortable swimming with them.

However, when the age groupers or college kids join us due to school or work conflicts they all comment, "Dang, you old guys/gals can bring it." But, we do about 1/4 the kicking they do and about half the yardage.

swimshark
July 14th, 2009, 03:24 PM
One of my issues is that my daughter's departure from competitive swimming was nothing short of incendiary. There was a boy on her team, he was offended when she dumped him, violent threats were made and things went downhill from there. Most of the local swim families followed the spectacular soap opera that ensued and now just about all the swim community takes a wide berth to avoid dealing with my daughter and I. The silence was deafening back when my daughter would come and train with me in the early mornings when she thought she might still take a run at competing.

I'm sorry this happened. I would hope that those involved have moved on so you can train with those you need/want to.

As for your kick.... I see training with age group as a good opportunity to work on your kick a lot. Two weeks ago I got a cortisone shot in my ankle from a year old injury. I'm lucky that my coach is understanding so when we do a kick set, I wear one fin (on the food foot) and I can keep up and pass some of them. I bet if you talk to the age group coach, he would let you start off with some light fins on and work up to staying with them. There are days when hanging with the kids is hard on my body but I know it will help me over all in my swimming. Today we did 50 LCM races at the end and I did 35.1 free from a push. That's not something I'd expect to do a few months or years ago. So, go for it with the kids team. I think you'll surprise yourself.

CreamPuff
July 16th, 2009, 06:05 PM
I'm sorry this happened. I would hope that those involved have moved on so you can train with those you need/want to.

As for your kick.... I see training with age group as a good opportunity to work on your kick a lot. Two weeks ago I got a cortisone shot in my ankle from a year old injury. I'm lucky that my coach is understanding so when we do a kick set, I wear one fin (on the food foot) and I can keep up and pass some of them. I bet if you talk to the age group coach, he would let you start off with some light fins on and work up to staying with them.

I so identify with the one fin thing (I hope your ankle is better now)!
When I was *road kill* I seriously considered asking the coach to let me wear 1 fin as a compromise; however, I wasn't injured in ANY capacity so I chickened out! :D

What is working for me in terms of developing (or getting) kick -
1. 6 Beat Kick the Warm Up (that's anywhere from 1000 to 2000 meters) - moderate kick and then
2. 6 Beat Kick the entire 1 hour masters practice and then
3. 6 Beat Kick key free sets during the longer 2 hour USA-S practices (strategically) - so if we were doing 400s or 300s or 200s, I would 6 beat kick (hard) the 2nd half of each distance.
I found I could then do kick only sets and kick/ swim sets.
The first month was the worst as I felt I could not breathe. I would say by month 3 things really started to fall in place. I adapted to it and I can't imagine not kicking. It may look crazy to 6 beat kick the warm up, but warm up is the best place to try and break bad habits.

qbrain
July 16th, 2009, 06:26 PM
It may look crazy to 6 beat kick the warm up, but warm up is the best place to try and break bad habits.

I think this is good advice. I tend not to kick during warm up and this probably carries over to not six beat kicking most of practice. If you start with warm up it would be silly not to keep it up.

funkyfish
July 16th, 2009, 08:25 PM
I so identify with the one fin thing (I hope your ankle is better now)!
When I was *road kill* I seriously considered asking the coach to let me wear 1 fin as a compromise; however, I wasn't injured in ANY capacity so I chickened out! :D

What is working for me in terms of developing (or getting) kick -
1. 6 Beat Kick the Warm Up (that's anywhere from 1000 to 2000 meters) - moderate kick and then
2. 6 Beat Kick the entire 1 hour masters practice and then
3. 6 Beat Kick key free sets during the longer 2 hour USA-S practices (strategically) - so if we were doing 400s or 300s or 200s, I would 6 beat kick (hard) the 2nd half of each distance.
I found I could then do kick only sets and kick/ swim sets.
The first month was the worst as I felt I could not breathe. I would say by month 3 things really started to fall in place. I adapted to it and I can't imagine not kicking. It may look crazy to 6 beat kick the warm up, but warm up is the best place to try and break bad habits.
Man, this is not the news I wanted to hear, but based on my limited exposure to swimming and swimming hard (for me anyway), I have to concede agreement. I used to rarely do flip turns in practice as a kid, but now do it every practice (it took me about 6 months of forcing the habit). Maybe by working my kick more the same thing will occur for me.
:bliss:

swimshark
July 17th, 2009, 07:16 AM
I so identify with the one fin thing (I hope your ankle is better now)!
When I was *road kill* I seriously considered asking the coach to let me wear 1 fin as a compromise; however, I wasn't injured in ANY capacity so I chickened out! :D
.

Cream, I'm happy to report that I kicked 150 m without a fin yesterday for the first time since Oct!! Finally. And I can kick breast again. :banana:

Funky, good luck. Your kick will get better. Just keep working on it.

Animal
July 17th, 2009, 07:52 AM
I train with my son's age group team two or three times a week, and it has been a wonderful experience. I get to swim different sets than I would normal do. Just ask the coach and hopefully, that person is open to the idea.

CreamPuff
July 17th, 2009, 09:36 AM
I think this is good advice. I tend not to kick during warm up and this probably carries over to not six beat kicking most of practice. If you start with warm up it would be silly not to keep it up.

Thanks Q. I saw one of the national kids use warm up to learn how to do 5 to 6 SDK's off each wall (and he's now really good at SDK SCY), so I felt that the same thing could apply to 6 beat kick. After the LCM season in 2 weeks, I will use warm up to do the same thing with SDK. I'm not looking forward to it but it's just a necessary evil now.

CreamPuff
July 17th, 2009, 09:37 AM
Cream, I'm happy to report that I kicked 150 m without a fin yesterday for the first time since Oct!! Finally. And I can kick breast again. :banana:

Funky, good luck. Your kick will get better. Just keep working on it.

Great news Shark! It's such a nice feeling to be able to kick and 150 is a good distance. Did you feel a bit lopsided with the one fin only?

swimshark
July 17th, 2009, 03:35 PM
Great news Shark! It's such a nice feeling to be able to kick and 150 is a good distance. Did you feel a bit lopsided with the one fin only?

I did with fly. I would go crooked doing fly kick. hee-hee. But after months of this, I got used to it. Most of the time that I had the one fin on (on my good foot) my bad foot was just dragging behind anyway. Now let's hope the bad foot holds up for this Sunday's meet and 400 IM.

CreamPuff
July 17th, 2009, 03:55 PM
I did with fly. I would go crooked doing fly kick. hee-hee. But after months of this, I got used to it. Most of the time that I had the one fin on (on my good foot) my bad foot was just dragging behind anyway. Now let's hope the bad foot holds up for this Sunday's meet and 400 IM.

Good luck at the meet! Makes sense on the fly kick. I run screaming from the 400 IM!

swimshark
July 18th, 2009, 06:56 AM
Good luck at the meet! Makes sense on the fly kick. I run screaming from the 400 IM!

Thanks.