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ande
August 3rd, 2009, 10:50 AM
NCAA also placing limits on high-tech suits
(AP) – 4 days ago

INDIANAPOLIS — The NCAA is placing restrictions on high-tech suits in college competition similar to the ones swimming's world governing body enacted this week.

The NCAA said Wednesday that its swimming and diving committees for all three divisions have endorsed rules that limit coverage and the type of material used. The Playing Rules Oversight Panel must still approve the changes, which could go into effect for the start of the season in September.

Suits cannot go past the knee; men's suits must stop at the waist, and women's at the shoulder. Materials must be completely permeable to air and water and be no more than 0.8 millimeters thick.

The NCAA said it was not influenced by FINA's decision. Like their counterparts on the international level, college coaches balked at seeing the new high-tech suits rewrite the record books.

Seventy NCAA meet records were set in 2009. But after much discussion, the committees decided not to wipe those marks from the books. Heat sheets at the 2010 NCAA championships, though, will include the pre-2009 records for context.

from:
NCAA also placing limits on high-tech suits (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5h2aDEIYvbrtL_c58IOBbi22plh1QD99O94Q00)


New NCAA Swimsuit Standards Defined
Indianapolis, IN , July 30th, 2009

As the world waits to see whether FINA stands up against suit manufacturers, details from the new NCAA swimsuit recommendations are emerging. The recommendations which were passed by the NCAA swimming and diving committee yesterday are headed for approval by the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel.

Here are the official recommendations:

MATERIAL

Textile –
The material used for the swimsuit shall be a textile (a woven material).

Permeability –
All swimsuit materials must be 100 percent permeable to air and water.

Buoyancy –
The swimsuit shall have a net buoyant effect of not more than .5 Newtons (roughly 51 grams or 1.8 ounces).

Thickness –
The material used shall have a maximum thickness of .8 millimeters. (This measurement is in accordance with International Organization for Standardization 5084 for textiles.)

Ergogenic aids –
The material shall not provide external stimulation or influence of any form (for example, pain reduction, chemical/medical substance release, electro-stimulation, compression of body profile or other performance-enhancing properties).

DESIGN

When used, the material shall follow the body shape.
The design shall not create air-trapping effects.
For men, the swimsuit shall not extend above the waist and below the top of the kneecap.
For women, the swimsuit shall not extend beyond the shoulders and below the top of the kneecap, nor cover the neck.

CONSTRUCTION

Any system providing external stimulation or influence of any form (for example, pain reduction, chemical/medical substance release, electro-stimulation, compression of body profile or other performance-enhancing properties) is prohibited.
The swimsuit shall not have any zippers or fasteners other than a waist tie for a brief or a jammer.
The swimsuit shall be composed of no more than two layers, the sum of which shall not exceed .8 millimeters in total thickness (except in the casing/ribbing in the terminal ends of the swimsuit).
Elastic material may be contained within the casing/ribbing in the terminal ends of the swimsuit (for example, shoulder straps, waist opening, leg openings).

CUSTOMIZATION

All swimsuits must be constructed in an identical fashion with no variation/modification for individual swimmers.
Modifications or alterations (for example, tape or water resistant sprays) are prohibited.
One post-construction impermeable school logo (not to exceed 9 square inches) may be applied to the swimsuit.
Swimmers with physical disabilities may request a waiver for customization from the NCAA swimming and diving secretary-rules editor at least one week before the individual’s first competition.

USE

A swimmer shall be limited to wearing only one swimsuit.

From:

New NCAA Swimsuit Standards Defined (http://www.collegeswimming.com/news/2009/jul/30/new-ncaa-swimsuit-standards-detailed/)
Indianapolis, IN , July 30th, 2009

Jazz Hands
August 3rd, 2009, 11:30 AM
The material shall not provide external stimulation or influence of any form (for example, pain reduction, chemical/medical substance release, electro-stimulation, compression of body profile or other performance-enhancing properties).

Eh? Even a standard lycra suit provides some compression of body profile.

That Guy
August 3rd, 2009, 12:27 PM
Yeah, I'm sure that swimmers will continue to squeeze into suits that are at least one size too small. Compression, yes. Pain reduction, not so much :)

DPC
August 3rd, 2009, 12:41 PM
So this would rule out the FS-Pro vintage suits from Speedo and the similar generation suits from TYR, Nike, etc. The whole issue of being water repellent and the "compression" (aside from trying to squeeze a 36 inch body into a 32 suit). Is this a little overkill - isn't the Pro more like to old paper suits from the 80's?? I don't need another $100 practice suit.

humanpunchingbag
August 3rd, 2009, 01:01 PM
Yeah, I'm sure that swimmers will continue to squeeze into suits that are at least one size too small. Compression, yes. Pain reduction, not so much :)

Funny story: my wife was timing at an age-group meet and overheard two twelve-year old boys discussing their new racing suits. The first asked the second "After this race, its going to be a while until your next one; are you going to get out of your Fast-Skin?" To which the second replied (obviously he did not know that my wife could hear him): " Are you kidding? Of course I am; my balls feel like pancakes this suit is so tight!!"

"Pain reduction not so much": at least for men (an obviously boys too).

lefty
August 3rd, 2009, 01:02 PM
So this would rule out the FS-Pro vintage suits from Speedo and the similar generation suits from TYR, Nike, etc.

The permeablility and ergogenic aid categories really are nonsense. Concrete is permeable to some extent. The only thing that matters is suit thickness and possibly bouancy. I don't know if bouyancy can be measured with any precision. I suspect not.

Before reading this through, I already had it in my mind that some people would take jaked and x-glide suits and modify them into jammers. I guess that cannot be done which is a good thing.

tjrpatt
August 3rd, 2009, 01:05 PM
Funny story: my wife was timing at an age-group meet and overheard two twelve-year old boys discussing their new racing suits. The first asked the second "After this race, its going to be a while until your next one; are you going to get out of your Fast-Skin?" To which the second replied (obviously he did not know that my wife could hear him): " Are you kidding? Of course I am; my balls feel like pancakes this suit is so tight!!"

"Pain reduction not so much": at least for men (an obviously boys too).

How do the female swimmers who aren't flat chested feel about the suits?

humanpunchingbag
August 3rd, 2009, 01:14 PM
How do the female swimmers who aren't flat chested feel about the suits?

My poor daughter who likely ended her racing carreer by expanding several bra sizes in one year can tell you: they get pounding headaches from the straps cutting into them, develop deep chafe marks on their shoulders and "unstrap" the moment the race is over. My daughter? She is already campaigning for a reduction surgery (supported by her mother which suffered the same issue in her youth and settled on the same solution).

DPC
August 3rd, 2009, 01:21 PM
Concrete is permeable to some extent


Don't give them (FINA) any ideas, I have enough to contend with the lead in my a**.

Dolphin 2
August 3rd, 2009, 03:43 PM
Another success story from the campaign headquarters of the Tech Suit Basher's Club of America (TSBCA)!!! :D

Dolphin 2

tjrpatt
August 3rd, 2009, 05:41 PM
My poor daughter who likely ended her racing carreer by expanding several bra sizes in one year can tell you: they get pounding headaches from the straps cutting into them, develop deep chafe marks on their shoulders and "unstrap" the moment the race is over. My daughter? She is already campaigning for a reduction surgery (supported by her mother which suffered the same issue in her youth and settled on the same solution).

Wow, that sounds terrible. yeah, I remember one swimmer who I used to train with in my age group club who had an expanding bra size. She eventually stopped swimming because she was carrying too much drag and was getting slower. There is one woman at my Y who has the same issue but the enhanced bra size doesn't seem to slow her down. But, I am sure that she would experience the same problems that your daughter had if she had a tech suit on. Thank gosh, I never had the desirable to put one of these suits when I was alot heavier last year.

orca1946
August 3rd, 2009, 07:29 PM
So , this means Jammers !!!