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Blade
September 1st, 2009, 06:13 PM
Apologies if this makes me sound like a troll.

In all my experience of indoor swimming pools, despite all the swimming I do to warm up, the pool seems cold.

At the pool I visit every week, there is an electronic LED board with the temperature and the pool I swim in (for average swimmers who can't tread water - deep end about 5ft to 6ft, shallow end suitable for a youngster of 4+ years) is 27 or 29 degrees celcius. This swimming pool is local to where I went to school and I remember having to use the baby pool (when I was young enough!) which was 31 degrees celcius and this was warm enough to not shiver.

I try to tackle this by always keeping my shoulders below the water and always keeping on the move at pace to keep warm but I can't help but find the water is cold. This is a real shame as it takes away my enjoyment and satisfaction that I am benefitting my health because it prevents me from covering some real distance and pushing myself (within reason).

To make things worse, I have looked at other pools on google local to where I live and for the ones with websites and which state the temperature, it is 27 degrees celcius which seems to be the norm so it looks like I won't be able to find the right pool (all pools mentioned in this pool are indoor). :(

What can I do?

Syd
September 1st, 2009, 08:09 PM
And I thought I was a ninny when it came to cold water. You take the cake! 27 - 29 degrees, by most peoples' standards, is hardly cold. A lot of people would find that waaaay to hot to train in. The indoor pool I go to is also kept somewhere between 27 and 29 and, for me, that is just right. But everyone's perception of what is cold is different. Surely after a brisk warm up you don't feel cold any more? The only thing I can think of to suggest is to wear a wetsuit. Is it perhaps because you have only started swimming recently? Water temperature is something the body acclimatizes to. And, if it is the case, after a while, you won't feel cold at that temperature any more.

__steve__
September 2nd, 2009, 01:14 AM
80F for me just feels cool at first and anything below 75F will make me dizzy and causes headaches after a workout. I usually wimp out before others when it comes to cool water. But the water temps your swimming in should not be unbearable. I am not a MD but I would guess it could be one of 3 things: 1) just hate cold water 2) hypothalamus 3) metabolic.


Try thinking about the guy that swims 1000M in artic water in just a speedo to remind you how warm it is

Jazz Hands
September 2nd, 2009, 01:41 AM
http://www.getsnuggie.com/

frankiej
September 2nd, 2009, 07:27 AM
The pool I swam in the summer was at a consistent 70-72F. It was nice after a full day of work out in the sun and only was cold until I got to swimming a bit.

Kick sets always warm me up since I work hard while doing them.

swimshark
September 2nd, 2009, 07:39 AM
Maybe try getting one of the sun shirts to keep you warmer. To me, 27-29 would be way too warm to train in. I would feel sick after a few minutes. But if you are getting cold from it, sounds like you need to cover up more.

hnatkin
September 2nd, 2009, 10:12 AM
Maybe I'm a toughie but I've always believed that if you are cold while working out in 80+ degree water, then you are not working hard enough. Have you tried speeding up your pace or working harder intervals to get your heart rate up? Your body should get warm from the exertion.

Gdavis
September 2nd, 2009, 10:43 AM
Maybe try getting one of the sun shirts to keep you warmer.
I sometimes use a neoprene surf shirt in cold water. Good for extra resistance too! Wearing multiple swim caps also helps. Why not go to a surf store and try something like this?
http://www.oneill.com/#/men/americacanada/collection/men/wetsuits/surf/tops_and_bottoms/gooru_ss_crew_1/black_grey/

Anyone feeling cold in 29deg C must have reptilian tendencies.:D

knelson
September 2nd, 2009, 11:46 AM
To me, 27-29 would be way too warm to train in.

You sure? The vast majority of (lap) pools are in this range. That's 80-84 in Fahrenheit. 80 can definitely feel pretty cool unless you are working hard.

To answer the OP's question I think the best advice is to keep moving. If you stop you will get cold. Work hard and your body will produce lots of heat to keep you warm. A warm cap and ear plugs can help, too.

DeskJockeyJim
September 2nd, 2009, 01:08 PM
You could always try something like this:
http://www.desotosport.com/products/product.asp?Category=bp&ProdID=SV9

Designed for swimming (well, triathons:bolt:)...anti-chlorine treatment, and de soto is known for having some of the best customer service in the biz.

Laura 33
September 2nd, 2009, 01:13 PM
I'm curious if you swim before breakfast. Try eating protein two to three hours before you swim. This can add heat to the body. I eat protein before open water cold swims and it really makes a difference, so it should work for pool swimming, too.

aquageek
September 2nd, 2009, 01:32 PM
These seem to help the folks at our pool who don't like cooler water:

lefty
September 2nd, 2009, 04:02 PM
These seem to help the folks at our pool who don't like cooler water:


I don't know that it helps in fact I think it is a cause. If you are noodling you are not working hard enough to warm up. I don't mean that as an attack against noodlers. I am stating it as fact.

aquageek
September 2nd, 2009, 04:57 PM
I don't know that it helps in fact I think it is a cause. If you are noodling you are not working hard enough to warm up. I don't mean that as an attack against noodlers. I am stating it as fact.

I thought noodles might have secret warming powers given the how they are hugged upon.

Jazz Hands
September 2nd, 2009, 05:05 PM
80 can definitely feel pretty cool unless you are working hard.

Emphasis added for benefit of the OP.

nkfrench
September 2nd, 2009, 06:25 PM
We had a very thin swimmer with us for a while but the 82F water temps were too cold for her. She was very low fat and only lightly-muscled with a tiny body frame. Not sure if that was just her genetics or if she was anorexic. She ended up getting a full-body lycra bodysuit, which helped a bit but her hands and particularly her feet still would get painfully cold.

Her circulation was impaired by the cold so she was building up lactic acid during her warmup, which forced her to slow down ... and then a workout with long-rest intervals made things even worse. She was a triathlete and had a good work ethic and had good conditioning, just no cold tolerance. I am guessing she was very good as a long-distance runner.

Belle vie
September 3rd, 2009, 09:02 AM
Hello Blade, Do you wear a cap when you swim? Caps trap a lot of heat and may be of help to you. Try a long hot shower befor enterng the pool. Also, try swimming a very fast first lap if you can or a first length. If I feet too cool that gets my heart rate up and I feel nice and warm. Then I slow down for a proper warm-up.

The three of four public swimming pools here in France all stay at between 27-28 degrees Celsius. I assume that is the accepted norm. Sometimes I feel cool when I first get in but am good and warmed up after the first lap.

Good Luck,

Elizabeth

jennifer
September 8th, 2009, 12:51 AM
Hello Blade, Do you wear a cap when you swim? Caps trap a lot of heat and may be of help to you.

I second this one!

freeflower1963
October 16th, 2009, 04:49 PM
The biggest problem I have is getting into the pool at 6am when the water is 72-74 degrees. When I first started swimming, May 2009, it took me 15 minutes to get up my nerve to get in and just swim to warm up. Now it only takes me 5-10 minutes to get in. I question sometimes why I do this shock to my body so early in the morning, but once I get going I love it and would not change anything. I am running into the same thing. I live in florida and when it starts to get cooler, will I be able to get into the pool? This will be my first winter swimming. People tell me that the water will be warmer than the air, but I have to admit, I get cold in the summer in the water. Just inspiring words would be great!!
:cheerleader:

BR KnuckleDragger
October 16th, 2009, 04:55 PM
I love a pool that is around 85F to swim in, my muscles get warmed up quicker and my knees hurt less (Breaststroker)

:bliss:

I hate when I jump in a pool and I scream french obscenities under water...

:afraid:

Fight on and beat the Domers...

__steve__
October 16th, 2009, 05:11 PM
I seem to swim fastest in about 77-78˚F. Unfortunately the pool I train in is 86˚F (set by noodlers), which even though I can tolerate, makes it shocking to jump into faster pool's. My coordination goes south if I'm not used to it.

ViveBene
October 16th, 2009, 07:21 PM
The biggest problem I have is getting into the pool at 6am when the water is 72-74 degrees. When I first started swimming, May 2009, it took me 15 minutes to get up my nerve to get in and just swim to warm up. Now it only takes me 5-10 minutes to get in. I question sometimes why I do this shock to my body so early in the morning, but once I get going I love it and would not change anything. I am running into the same thing. I live in florida and when it starts to get cooler, will I be able to get into the pool? This will be my first winter swimming. People tell me that the water will be warmer than the air, but I have to admit, I get cold in the summer in the water. Just inspiring words would be great!!
:cheerleader:

I would recommend doing something like jumping jacks or toe touches or vigorous arm swings or running in place to warm up your body before you immerse yourself in water. :)

spell_me
October 17th, 2009, 09:44 AM
I would recommend doing something like jumping jacks or toe touches or vigorous arm swings or running in place to warm up your body before you immerse yourself in water. :)

I second this motion!

spell_me
October 17th, 2009, 10:00 AM
Something I've been wondering about-- The pool I usually swim at is 79 or 80F, which I would say is just about ideal. But in the summer I sometimes swim at a pool that is a lot warmer. I don't know the temp, but it's definitely a lot warmer, and anyway, I've noticed that my shoulders don't hurt when I swim there. Is colder water worse for swimmer's shoulder-type problems?

smontanaro
October 17th, 2009, 11:43 AM
I would recommend doing something like jumping jacks or toe touches or vigorous arm swings or running in place to warm up your body before you immerse yourself in water. :)

Or ride your bike to the pool...

S

Lui
October 18th, 2009, 04:20 AM
The average pool temperature is 27-29 degrees. If it is warmer it gets too warm after you swim for about 10 minutes. I always hate that first momnet when you jump into the pool but after 10 minutes of warming up it feels just right.
When I lived in La Paz for 5 years until 2008 I had difficulties finding a pool. Bolivia is a poor country and doesn't just have public pools. I contacted a triathlon club and they got me the membership of the military school pool which was a brand new pool on the military school base. The pool, the changing rooms and the showers were great and everything was new and in a brilliant shape but after a while they couldn't afford to heat the pool to more than about 22 degrees Celsius. Apparently heating those extra 5-6 degrees cost a couple of thousand dollars more a month.
No matter how long and how hard I swam I was always freezing. I'm not sure if the body gets used to it but after 6 months I stopped going there and bought a spin bike instead which was a pity because otherwise the pool was so good.