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View Full Version : Hansen pulling a "Gary Hall, Jr."



tjrpatt
September 9th, 2009, 02:02 PM
Now, Hansen doesn't want to train/compete during non-Olympic years. Well, at least, he is staying in good shape with the triathlon training/competing. I wouldn't like his "Gary Hall, Jr." approach this if he wasn't doing the tri stuff. But, since he is doing some kind of training, it can't hurt to try new things at 28. He has probably tried everything else to win that Olympic gold. Overall, I think that Shanteau is the future of American Breaststrokers. Hansen had his day back in 2004 to 2006. But, who knows what can happen. Dara Torres is America's best sprinter right now and she is in her 40s.

http://reachforthewall.com/2009/09/09/hansen-wont-compete-in-2009-2010/

lefty
September 9th, 2009, 04:13 PM
Now, Hansen doesn't want to train/compete during non-Olympic years. Well, at least, he is staying in good shape with the triathlon training/competing. I wouldn't like his "Gary Hall, Jr." approach this if he wasn't doing the tri stuff. But, since he is doing some kind of training, it can't hurt to try new things at 28. He has probably tried everything else to win that Olympic gold. Overall, I think that Shanteau is the future of American Breaststrokers. Hansen had his day back in 2004 to 2006. But, who knows what can happen. Dara Torres is America's best sprinter right now and she is in her 40s.

http://reachforthewall.com/2009/09/09/hansen-wont-compete-in-2009-2010/


looking at his tri results: he is a very good runner but an average biker

DanSad
September 10th, 2009, 12:09 PM
I don't think we'll see him or Crocker ever again.

Ahelee Sue Osborn
September 10th, 2009, 01:20 PM
looking at his tri results: he is a very good runner but an average biker

The cycling takes time to develop.

Usually swimmers turning to triathlon are able to run pretty fast, but their bodies are not ready for the pounding. Early injuries are common mainly due to impatience to get fast quickly.

But cycling can be worked from the begining.
That is if the athlete can take sitting on a bike seat for long stretches of time! Lots of strategy and variations of training make it pretty darn fun.

I would not say that co-existing as a triathlete and competitive swimmer makes one faster in the pool.
But that is just my own personal experience.

If Brendan likes triathlon, I imagine he could be quite good with his reputation for meticulous training and planning.

orca1946
September 10th, 2009, 07:57 PM
Can't he try some thing else for a while ?

tjrpatt
September 10th, 2009, 08:20 PM
I don't think we'll see him or Crocker ever again.


Crocker who?? :) I think that Hansen might give it another shot but I doubt that Crocker will. I wish Hansen well but enough for the articles every six months about your sabbatical or when you are or aren't going to get back to competitive swimming. But, I guess that he does these interviews to keep him relevant or something.

lefty
September 11th, 2009, 02:52 PM
I would not say that co-existing as a triathlete and competitive swimmer makes one faster in the pool.
But that is just my own personal experience.


I agree and am trying to figure out why. I was going to start a post called "cross training doesn’t help" I have swam 15-18K pretty consistently this whole year. I added running to my routine 2.5 months ago and since then my swimming has deteriorated. It might be because I am physically tired but I think the real reason is reduced flexibility.

stillwater
September 11th, 2009, 05:54 PM
I would not say that co-existing as a triathlete and competitive swimmer makes one faster in the pool.

True.

Sports are specific. There is a generality to many sports, yet at elite levels, there aren't many who can excell at more than one.

Nolan Ryan may be able to throw a baseball 90 miles an hour but I'll bet a dozen donuts he couldn't throw a football anywhere near NFL caliber.

Remember Michael Jordan's attempt at MLB?

Why aren't the ranks of masters golf filled with ex-pro athletes? Why can't Ion win at swimming? (ok forget the last one).

Specificity of sport.

Hansen will do just fine as a tri-athlete. Chances are he won't be world class, but more power to him for trying. It is triathaloning after all.

jonblank
September 15th, 2009, 01:51 PM
True.

Sports are specific. There is a generality to many sports, yet at elite levels, there aren't many who can excell at more than one.


2 words: Neon. Deion. Scored an NFL touchdown and hit a MLB home run in the same week.

Very few others. In our sport, I believe Matt Biondi was a superb water polo player; I'm sure there are other swim/polo stars whose names I'm forgetting at the moment. John Moffitt was a very good cyclist, and Mike Barrowman tried out for the US Canoeing team, though I'm not sure how far he got in that quest. There must be other examples of swimmers who excel at other sports. I for example play a mean game of beer pong.

pwb
September 15th, 2009, 05:32 PM
There must be other examples of swimmers who excel at other sports.

I don't think so ... isn't that why we're swimmers in the first place? :)

aquageek
September 15th, 2009, 06:40 PM
Swimming doesn't leave a lot of time for other sports.

elise526
September 15th, 2009, 08:53 PM
World class female triathletes usually have a DIV. I swim background and are usually excellent runners. Laura Bennett is a good example. She was an All-America in swimming in high school and college. She also was the Florida State High School Track Champion in the 1 mile and 2 mile.

Laura Bennett

Athletic Background: Was an eight-time All-American and member of the 1997 NCAA Champion 400 Medley Relay while swimming at SMU... Was the co-captain of the team her senior season (1996-97)... While swimming for the Mustangs, was on the team with six 1996 Olympians from six countries, including 1997 NCAA Swimmer of the Year Martina Moravcova (Slovakia)... While at Cardinal Newman High School in West Palm Beach, Fla., earned All-America honors in 1993 in swimming... Was also the 1991 (So.) and 1992 (Jr.) Florida High School Track Champion in the mile and 2-mile... Team won the 1990 (So.) and 1992 (Jr.) High School Cross Country Championships... Began swimming competitively in sixth grade (age 12)... While growing up, enjoyed playing football with older brother.

http://www.usatriathlon.org/athlete/athlete/979

SCOFIELD
September 16th, 2009, 03:21 AM
True.

Sports are specific. There is a generality to many sports, yet at elite levels, there aren't many who can excell at more than one.

Nolan Ryan may be able to throw a baseball 90 miles an hour but I'll bet a dozen donuts he couldn't throw a football anywhere near NFL caliber.



First of all Nolan Ryan threw for 100 miles and hour. Secondly, Nolan Ryan used to throw footballs all the time during the off-season to keep his arm strength. I'm pretty sure he can "throw" a football just as good as any NFL quarterback during his prime if not even better.

Just about any MLB pitcher can throw a football just as good as an NFL quarterback. Now, can they avoid getting tackled and run while throwing a football, that's a whole different skill set.

stillwater
September 16th, 2009, 11:08 AM
I don't think even Nolan Ryan could throw a baseball 100 miles.

While your pretty sure he could match (or better) throwing a football with the best of the NFL, I'm pretty darn sure he couldn't.

Argument solved.

lefty
September 16th, 2009, 11:13 AM
While your pretty sure he could match (or better) throwing a football with the best of the NFL, I'm pretty darn sure he couldn't.


There is anecdotal evidense that he could. I think on the back of a baseball card that depicts him throwing a football (again reading defenses etc is a different matter. I am just talking about the mechanics of throwing a football).

The Fortress
September 16th, 2009, 11:14 AM
I agree and am trying to figure out why. I was going to start a post called "cross training doesn’t help" I have swam 15-18K pretty consistently this whole year. I added running to my routine 2.5 months ago and since then my swimming has deteriorated. It might be because I am physically tired but I think the real reason is reduced flexibility.

I love to run, but essentially gave it up except for a few post meet runs the last 10-11 months. My swimming improved. The running caused a lot of leg fatigue for me. And running in the heat caused too much general fatigue. Now some of this is no doubt because I already pound my legs in the pool and weight room, but still ...

On the other hand, Vlad P runs 5 miles a day ...

Spinning is less fatiguing than running for me. But running is hands down the best exercise for weight control.

Caroline Krattli was a superb beach volleyball player before she became a swimmer. But doing 2 sports at a high level simultaneously? Unlikely.

TRYM_Swimmer
September 16th, 2009, 11:38 AM
But doing 2 sports at a high level simultaneously? Unlikely.

Absolutely. But I think the whole sports culture has changed significantly over the years. In the 60's it wasn't that unusual for a Div I football player to play basketball and/or baseball, or even wrestling (until many schools dropped it). I can remember a defensive tackle for a major Div I school in 1964-5 who was an All-American for three years and also lettered in Basketball and Baseball his Sophomore year. But he broke his leg sliding into a base and was thereafter only allowed to play football, which eventually got him into the NFL. Now, you see that rarely, and normally not to the delight of the respective coaches. There just isn't any off-season now. And the training has gotten to be so specific, that being prepared in one can often negate the preparation for another, as several have pointed out here from their own experiences.

But I have found that athletes good in one sport usually have a bit of talent in another; there just isn't time to develop that.

knelson
September 16th, 2009, 02:36 PM
Just about any MLB pitcher can throw a football just as good as an NFL quarterback. Now, can they avoid getting tackled and run while throwing a football, that's a whole different skill set.

And throwing it accurately to a moving target at some variable distance downfield. Totally different than throwing a baseball the same distance and pretty much to the same spot every time.

DPC
September 16th, 2009, 05:02 PM
I don't think even Nolan Ryan could throw a baseball 100 miles.

While your pretty sure he could match (or better) throwing a football with the best of the NFL, I'm pretty darn sure he couldn't.

Argument solved.

Ryan has recorded the fastest offical pitch at a little over 100 mph. I think it was in a game.

As for football - he did throw footballs as an arm strengthening exercise, and if you saw the video, he was very acurate and the sprial was tight. Could he throw as well as Brady, P. Manning, Rivers or Brees? I doubt it, but then again their skill really lies in accuracy, touch and ability to make decisions. Lots of QBs can throw long passes, but can't hit open receivers. Could he have competed effectively in those bogus made for TV competitions? Sure, maybe even been in the top 5. Then again most QBs couldnt break 80 mph with a baseball I bet, so each has a special skill to be exceptional.

If it was just throwing a football vs playing the game, Ryan would/could excel because he worked hard and was a terrific athlete.

knelson
September 16th, 2009, 06:40 PM
Ryan has recorded the fastest offical pitch at a little over 100 mph.

Stillwater is correct, though. He said Ryan couldn't throw a baseball 100 miles. 100 miles, not 100 mph!