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Sharpsburger
September 21st, 2009, 10:32 PM
Howdy.

I'm returning to the pool after many years away.

Since I don't have a coach, I'm attempting to get back into it on my own.

Anyone care to recommend must-have books?

Of course, I'm not going to try to collect a library or anything. So the question is, if you had to do it on your own, which books would you consider essential?

Right now I'm looking at 3 quite seriously:

Mastering Swimming

Complete Conditioning for Swimming

Breakthrough Swimming

Allen Stark
September 21st, 2009, 10:38 PM
Definitely get"Swimming Fastest" by Maglishio(spelling uncertain.)

james lucas
September 21st, 2009, 11:56 PM
Definitely get"Swimming Fastest" by Maglishio(spelling uncertain.)Definitely. Here's the link:
Amazon.com: Swimming Fastest (9780736031806): Ernest Maglischo: Books

"Complete Conditioning..." tells what you need to know about dry-land conditioning and training. It's the only book I've found that has much to say about training the "core" (oh, and by the way, my back hurts, but not as much as it did before I picked up that book).

"Breakthrough Swimming" is best for its history of swimming.

This is useful book for some swimmers:

Amazon.com: Fitness Swimming, Second Edition (9780736074575): Emmett Hines: Books

I got a lot out of this book when I first started swimming again:

Amazon.com: Swimming Past 50 (Ageless Athlete Series) (9780880119078): Mel Goldstein, David Tanner: Books

joshua
September 22nd, 2009, 08:49 AM
When I returned to swimming I found "Total Swimming" by Janet Evans to be very helpful. It has great templates to get you back into shape. Besides, she is such a cutie.

letsrace
September 22nd, 2009, 08:57 AM
In my mind, you should start with Maglischo, because it is the best reference. It covers nearly every aspect of swimming and it does so with a scientific mind.

frankiej
September 22nd, 2009, 08:59 AM
To tell you the truth I just watch people swim and kinda copy what they do. Granted they are people that train year round and are like fishes in the water.

I'm no speed demon but I can hold my own for only swimming for about 5 months.

mattson
September 22nd, 2009, 10:39 AM
I assume you've already looked over the list of titles at http://www.usms.org/merch/bookstore/swimming.php, and are asking people which of those titles they would recommend?

shouldyswimmer
September 22nd, 2009, 11:29 AM
If you are interested in weight training as well I liked:

http://books.google.com/books?id=-Yfra1si--sC&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=5&sig=ACfU3U07I4J9ISWB4K4AEbIwSPHKHvwb1g (http://books.google.com/books?id=-Yfra1si--sC&printsec=frontcover)

hofffam
September 22nd, 2009, 12:18 PM
I'll add another vote for Swimming Fastest. It isn't particularly easy to read because it is science oriented and encyclopedic in nature. But section by section - it is authoritative and clear.

I browsed the Janet Evans book at the bookstore. As much as I admire her - I thought the book was very much a "this is what I did" kind of book. It lacks theory and physiology.

If only Swimming Fastest had an accompanying DVD to watch swimmers instead of looking at B&W photos and drawings.....

Sharpsburger
September 22nd, 2009, 12:18 PM
I assume you've already looked over the list of titles at http://www.usms.org/merch/bookstore/swimming.php, and are asking people which of those titles they would recommend?

No, I hadn't been there. Thanks.

But anyway, yes, I'm asking for recos.

Looks like I should add Swimming Fastest to my list.

Also, I noticed that The Swimming Drill Book was on the also-bought lists for all the other books. Anybody got thoughts on that one?

As for "Weight Training for Swimming", I got the impression that this material would probably be covered by "Complete Conditioning for Swimming". And I might have to wait a few years to crack "Swimming Past 50". ;)

Sharpsburger
September 22nd, 2009, 12:20 PM
To tell you the truth I just watch people swim and kinda copy what they do. Granted they are people that train year round and are like fishes in the water.

I'm no speed demon but I can hold my own for only swimming for about 5 months.

Well, most of the folks at the pool I'm using, at the time I'm there, are seniors who are swimming, kicking, or even walking for fitness. Besides, I can't watch others and train at the same time.

My goal is to get competitive again, if possible. Even if I don't make it, that's what I'm striving for. And a lot has changed since I was competing.

qbrain
September 22nd, 2009, 12:40 PM
Swimming Fastest has got to be the worst recommendation for someone just returning to the sport.

Swimming Fastest is very much a advanced textbook on swimming. If you want to be a student of the sport from a scientific perspective, this is a great book. Plan on spending months with the book. If you try to read the book, decide what you will do, then start training, you may never get back in the pool.

Great book if you want to read about the theory of eddy currents created as your hand passes through the water and how that affects propulsion. Horrible book if you want to know how to get started after a couple hours of reading.

Now that I have panned one of my favorite books, I don't think there is a good book to get you started. What I would do if I were you is take advantage of the USMS video library, and check out some of the DVDs to bring you back up to speed on the state of swimming, ask questions in the forums and grab some planned workouts from the workouts section of the forums.

If you are unsure if Swimming Fastest meets you current needs, read this (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=3&url=http%3A%2F%2Fbooks.google.com%2Fbooks%3Fid%3Dc SSW4RhZOiwC%26dq%3Dswimming%2Bfastest%26printsec%3 Dfrontcover%26source%3Dbl%26ots%3DqjoxbuUX44%26sig %3DP_mqJjh8SvXzWclyzme127CKGJc%26hl%3Den%26ei%3Dnv 24SvvFC87rlAeemqzGDg%26sa%3DX%26oi%3Dbook_result%2 6ct%3Dresult%26resnum%3D3&ei=nv24SvvFC87rlAeemqzGDg&usg=AFQjCNFKpxLCwSsFD8GYv5dMdnF6DPStfg&sig2=0qHDnB8PC2VbnZTaGYfJYA) until you know if you need a copy or not.

Welcome back.

Sharpsburger
September 22nd, 2009, 01:16 PM
Swimming Fastest is very much a advanced textbook on swimming. If you want to be a student of the sport from a scientific perspective, this is a great book. Plan on spending months with the book.

Sounds right up my alley.


If you try to read the book, decide what you will do, then start training, you may never get back in the pool.

I doubt I would try to use it like that. I'm looking for a small group of books that complement each other.

I'm already back in the pool using workouts I'm finding via the forum.



Great book if you want to read about the theory of eddy currents created as your hand passes through the water and how that affects propulsion.

You bet! I have found, to my surprise, that I haven't lost much of my basic stroke. I guess it was so ingrained (after 2hrs/day, 6 days/wk -- at least -- for 7 years) that it's like riding a bicycle.

But I'm sure I've lost many finer points (e.g. on my 3rd workout I realized my fingers weren't fully together) and there have been many advances I'm completely unaware of.

I don't even know how to do a backstroke turn now, because we used to have to go to the wall on our backs, and my breaststroke is based on keeping my head from going underwater.



Now that I have panned one of my favorite books, I don't think there is a good book to get you started. What I would do if I were you is take advantage of the USMS video library, and check out some of the DVDs to bring you back up to speed on the state of swimming, ask questions in the forums and grab some planned workouts from the workouts section of the forums.

Thanks for the tip. I haven't looked at the vids yet, or checked out any of the DVD options. That should help a great deal!

qbrain
September 22nd, 2009, 02:23 PM
Sounds right up my alley.

Oh... disregard all my commentary on Swimming Fastest. It is probably the perfect book for you.


Thanks for the tip. I haven't looked at the vids yet, or checked out any of the DVD options. That should help a great deal!

No problem, but when I give good advice, it is purely by accident.

frankiej
September 22nd, 2009, 03:55 PM
Well, most of the folks at the pool I'm using, at the time I'm there, are seniors who are swimming, kicking, or even walking for fitness. Besides, I can't watch others and train at the same time.

My goal is to get competitive again, if possible. Even if I don't make it, that's what I'm striving for. And a lot has changed since I was competing.


Ya, I'm lucky to have college/highschool swimmers that train year around in the pools I swim at. Every once in awhile the coaches will come over and give me little pointers on how to improve.

Also helps if you have friends that swam a lot and were pretty good in their highschool years.

Sharpsburger
September 22nd, 2009, 04:01 PM
Also helps if you have friends that swam a lot and were pretty good in their highschool years.

There are only 4 old teammates I'm still in touch with, and none of them swim anymore. :(

qbrain
September 22nd, 2009, 08:36 PM
There are only 4 old teammates I'm still in touch with, and none of them swim anymore. :(

If you want live examples, why don't you ask one of the USAS coaches if you can watch a practice and ask some questions about things you see that are different now? Watching a practice won't take any of their time, and they can probably answer all your questions in a few minutes. Even if there isn't a team nearby, it would be worth a one time trip.

Sharpsburger
September 23rd, 2009, 12:42 AM
If you want live examples, why don't you ask one of the USAS coaches if you can watch a practice and ask some questions about things you see that are different now? Watching a practice won't take any of their time, and they can probably answer all your questions in a few minutes. Even if there isn't a team nearby, it would be worth a one time trip.

Thanks for the tip.

I think for now I'll start with the vids and books, see how I do. I'll probably get a better perspective that way than watching a practice from the deck. And I'm extremely shy about barging in one someone else's time -- it makes me feel very awkward and uncomfortable.

There's actually a team here, and I intended to start out with them, but for various reasons I've opted to do it on my own at the gym. I've got a 25 yard indoor pool I can use. The big downside is, no blocks and no diving. So I might get a guest pass from time to time at the aquatic center in the town where I work to practice that.

I might decide to join up with the team later. As it is, I can pick my times and my workouts, adjust my schedule around my work, and not have to pay any more than I'm already paying for gym membership, plus I have my own lane which is nice at this point when I'm still slow.

That sounds like a good way to begin.

Herb
September 27th, 2009, 06:44 PM
I personally got a lot out of Janet Evan's book. It was at the perfect level for myself coming off a 27 year lay off from competitive swimming since age group.

I would like to expand on that a bit and learn more about training for certain events. I guess I will try Mags book unless there is something in between. I find the technique stuff mostly useless as I am unable to follow it.

EricOrca
September 27th, 2009, 09:28 PM
Your doing what I did a year ago, although I never swam in age-group or college and started late in life...
I started with the Janet Evans book and followed the workouts for a few months and watched a lot of the video's on YouTube, I learned freestyle from emulating Ian Thorpe as viewed on YouTube. I did it so well that a local USA coach complemented me on my execution of it. Which proves that watching and imitation do work.I needed a coach to learn backstroke, breaststroke and Im still learning the fly! As these stroke are highly technical, so unless your gifted I strongly suggest finding a good coach that has an eye for stroke.
You don't want to build bad habits (like I did ) into your routine. (btw stay away from the 'expert' on "Expert Villiage" on YouTube.:))
Ive read most of the books mentioned and in my opinion;
1. Janet Evans Total Swimming is a great way to ease into a workout routine, in small steps. The heart of the book is Janet's workouts, these kept me challenged as a beginning competitive swimmer for the first few months. It also contains some simple dryland exercises.
2. The Fit Swimmer (Marianne Brems) has 120 workouts that are separated into Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced. This is good book, again for beginning workouts and getting a routine going.
3. The Swimming Drill Book was a waste of money for me
4. Mastering Swimming (Montgomery/Chambers) is a little more advanced, it basically teaches the hows and whys of the modern workouts. Some basics of stroke, but its not a book of workouts, Its a lot of talk about what most every day USA/USMS swimmer takes for granted.
5. Complete Conditioning for Swimming (Salo / Riewald) This is a dryland exercise book.

I have read other books, however there really is no substitution for a coach...If you can, even a private lesson or two will save you hours of frustration and wasted effort.

My books now sit silent and gathering dust...

Midas
September 27th, 2009, 09:53 PM
My advice would be to see if you can get these books from your local library first before investing in them. I currently have Complete Conditioning for Swimming checked out and based on what I've read I will probably buy it when the book comes due.

Bobinator
September 27th, 2009, 10:26 PM
I like to u-tube or go to flo-swimming and WATCH the concept I'm trying to work on at the moment. You have to be careful on u-tube, there are lots of great clips but there are also some bogus advice.
Swim Smooth is another resource online with plenty of tips and visuals. I'm not sure of the address; just type "swim smooth" in your SE and I think you'll find it. They have some free and useful downloads and they send weekly updates with different topics.
You don't need to spend any money in this age of technology! :)

Gdavis
September 28th, 2009, 04:11 PM
Has anyone mentioned the Swim Coaching Bible?
Amazon.com: The Swim Coaching Bible (9780736036467): Dick Hannula, Nort Thornton: Books
It offers a nice range of articles by great coaches.

jgale
September 28th, 2009, 08:08 PM
I don't have a swimming background and started swimming five years or so ago after a knee injury curtailed my running career. I agree with and have used some of the websites such as Swim Smooth and Go swim as well as youtube. I swim with a masters group three days per week. I have found the following books by Blythe Lucero to be helpful:

The Lucero's 100 Best Swimming Drills (good photos, nice drill progression)
Technique Swim Workouts (Coach Blythe Swim Workouts 1)
Shape Up!: 100 Conditioning Workouts (Swim Workouts 2)

The first book provides a very good set of drills and progressions for ech of the four strokes as well as clear photos. The next two provide workouts for each of the four competitive strokes with a specific focal point per workout with a nice progression per stroke. The Technique Swim Workout book is more heavily technique oriented and has work outs up to 2,500 yards/meters. The second book is more conditioning oriented with workouts up to 3,500 yards/meters although it still contains progressive workouts for all four strokes. I use them to put together workouts on the day that I don't swim with our Masters group. I find that I have to supplement the workouts a little to get the yardage up, especially with the Swim Technique book. The last two books also uses/reference specific drills in from her drill book so they all tie together. I understand that she is putting together a more advanced workout book which I will buy when it comes out.

I also like Salo's Complete Conditioning for Swimming for dryland training and Hanson, Hanson, and Bernhardt's Workouts in a Binder for Swimmers, Triathletes, and Coaches for addditional workouts. The latter has distance, middle distance, and sprint freestyle workouts as well as workouts for individual strokes and IM. The workouts are typically longer distance than the Lucero books and some top out at 6000 yards/meters for the distance workouts.

geochuck
September 28th, 2009, 08:18 PM
If you are a former swimmer do what you did when you were at the top of your game. There is so much on this forum you don't need to purchase a book. Some great workouts, some good videos and lots of advice.

ande
September 28th, 2009, 09:09 PM
what are your goals?

swim faster faster (http://www.usms.org/forums/showpost.php?p=191987&postcount=1269) can help you improve

follow usms blogs (http://www.usms.org/forums/blog.php)

Sharpsburger
October 6th, 2009, 01:14 AM
As these stroke are highly technical, so unless your gifted I strongly suggest finding a good coach that has an eye for stroke.

As it turns out, I am gifted. My coach, who was also Steve Lundquist's coach, predicted I'd make it to the Olympics, but life hands you what it hands you, and I left swimming in my teens to go to work to help support my family.

Another coach offered to take me to Florida to train (when the team disbanded he took a position with a university there) but my mother refused. I can understand why, and honestly, I probably wouldn't have been happy.

I don't regret my decision. But now that life is a bit more stable for me, I want to get back in the pool.

The only stroke I wasn't competitive in was butterfly, and dammit, I still can't swim that stroke worth a lick! Very frustrating. I might need to find a coach to get me on the right track with butterfly.


My books now sit silent and gathering dust...

Well, I have mine now, and I'm devouring them. I've taken a stroke off my pool length in freestyle right off the bat, and I'm adjusting my strength training routine. More to come!

Sharpsburger
October 6th, 2009, 01:17 AM
My advice would be to see if you can get these books from your local library first before investing in them. I currently have Complete Conditioning for Swimming checked out and based on what I've read I will probably buy it when the book comes due.

I prefer to own books so that I can mark them up and refer to them whenever I like and carry them wherever I please without worrying about keeping them too long or damaging them.

Besides, where I live, the libraries are horrible.

So I got 4 of the books, and I only wish I had more time in the week to read and apply what I'm learning.

Sharpsburger
October 6th, 2009, 01:19 AM
If you are a former swimmer do what you did when you were at the top of your game. There is so much on this forum you don't need to purchase a book. Some great workouts, some good videos and lots of advice.

I agree, but I do like the books, too, because they're portable. I can't always be online. I like to use a variety of sources.

Excellent forum, tho! Wonderful resource.

Oh, btw, doing what I did when I was at the top of my game doesn't work anymore. It's been too long. The sport has advanced while I have not.

Sharpsburger
October 6th, 2009, 01:25 AM
what are your goals?

Honestly? My goal is to compete nationally. I don't care if it takes 10 years.

I would like to be competitive at the state level in 2 years. (I've spent the previously 2 years getting in shape again generally, with walking, hiking, cycling, and strength training.) and competitive nationally before I'm 50.

I may not get there, but if not, so be it. That's what I'm shooting for.


swim faster faster (http://www.usms.org/forums/showpost.php?p=191987&postcount=1269) can help you improve

follow usms blogs (http://www.usms.org/forums/blog.php)

Thanks for the links! There's so much to absorb. My challenge now is triage -- choosing what to focus on first, second, third, etc.

qbrain
October 6th, 2009, 08:42 AM
Well, I have mine now, and I'm devouring them. I've taken a stroke off my pool length in freestyle right off the bat, and I'm adjusting my strength training routine. More to come!

Well, do share. What books have benefited you and how?

Sharpsburger
October 6th, 2009, 03:03 PM
Well, do share. What books have benefited you and how?

Breakthrough Swimming took the stroke off my 25yds. I was pulling too shallow. Gave me some nice visualization to get a feel for where I needed to be.

Just got done with my first modified dry-land workout, based on Complete Conditioning for Swimming. It feels good. Will take some time to see how it works out. But I'm optimistic.

I've also expanded my warm-ups and cool-downs based on Mastering Swimming, and will be incorporating some of the drills and more kicking next time I'm in the pool.

Swimming Fastest is going to take more time to absorb before I start using it. I'll likely begin by shaping my general workouts (pool/land) and improving my basic stroke forms with the 3 shorter books first -- along with resources on this site/forum -- then tackle Fastest to improve over that.

I've had the books less than a week, so I'm still working my way through. It'll be a while before I'm able to get all the juice out of them.

Sharpsburger
October 8th, 2009, 09:35 PM
Well, do share. What books have benefited you and how?

An update: I've started changing up my dry-land workout, and I like it so far. The only objection I have to CCFS's recommendations is the vertical row, which is a common item on lists of exercises to never do. So I've dropped that.

I really like the posterior chain. Hadn't seen that one before. I've never been quite satisfied with back/shoulder exercises, but this one hits all the right spots!

I've also started incorporating some drills from MS, and they're helping.

ande
October 8th, 2009, 11:02 PM
ok
go for it



Thanks for the links! There's so much to absorb. (http://www.usms.org/forums/showpost.php?p=191987&postcount=1269)
My challenge now is triage -- choosing what to focus on first, second, third, etc.
+ pick specific goals, events
+ find a meet enter it
+ train often
+ swim fast in practice
+ time yourself or have some one time you on fast swims in practice
+ work on kicking faster
+ ask yourself "what do I need to do to swim faster?"

Sharpsburger
October 8th, 2009, 11:46 PM
ok
go for it


pick specific goals events
find a meet enter it
train often
swim fast in practice
time yourself or have some one time you on fast swims in practice
work on kicking faster
ask yourself "what do I need to do to swim faster?"

I'm a sprinter. In order -- backstroke, crawl, breaststroke.

Or I should say, that's what I was.

(Although I did win a state-level 500 once -- the only 500 I ever entered. They gambled on me when there was no alternative. I mis-paced it, coming out too strong early, but as it turned out I gained a lead no one else could close. Dumb luck.)

We'll see if the years have made any changes.

I'm not yet at the point of picking specific goal events. There's a lot of groundwork yet to be done. First, I have to get in swim-shape, rather than just general shape. I have to establish my training routine.

Then, I have to judge my performance relative to current times. Once I've done that, then I can start to get more specific goals for competition.

But I'm not in any hurry. I'm not going to slack off, either, but it will happen as I make it happen.

As for training, right now I have an hour in the pool every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and an hour in the gym every Tuesday and Wednesday, and one weekend day I get 2 hours which I plan to split between gym and pool. One day a week I'll rest.

I started with 2000 yard workouts, but this week I bumped it up to 3000 yards. After 3 weeks back in the water, that's comfortable for me in an hour.

I'm still figuring out my workout pace. Unfortunately, I can't have anyone time me. I'm doing all this on my own. I have to keep track of it all in my head. A limitation, yes, but not one that I can't overcome.

I've added more kicking to my regimen just this week. Leg cramps are turning out to be the bane of my existence. Any advice on stretching would be greatly appreciated.

As for "What do I need to do to swim faster?", that's on my mind literally every second I'm in the water, and a lot of the time that I'm out of the water, too. I'm entirely focused on that. There's no way I can do what I intend to do otherwise.

5out6aintbad
October 9th, 2009, 09:47 AM
I love this resource and love the stories. Here's mine - so far!

I swam a bit as a youngster but was sent to a British boarding school aged 13 where going to church and wearing a suit were the two foremost technical skills taught outside of maths, English and Latin! Consequently I didn't swim much thereafter.

My four kids are all in a swim squad and through a stroke of luck (a drop out) i was given a pair of briefs and asked to join the parent's race at a gala. I felt the competitive spirit rise and swam a 25 meter leg for the first time in 30 years. I felt awesome and came in pretty fast. I have been blessed with a swimmers physique which had gone south a bit.

The head coach asked me to consider swimming with the masters and whilst I have the confidence I knew my fitness was woeful. I started lap swimming 20 minutes at first up to 90 minutes and four weeks ago started training with the masters.

Here is my learning;

1. I was technically so poor no amount of books or youtube videos could or did help. I needed a coach to pick up and prioritise the amends to my stroke.

2. Lap swimming gave me too many excuses to ease off, coached swimming seems to work better for me.

3. The team spirit with the masters is great, we all have different goals and go different speeds but enjoy it.

4. Maglischo Swimming Fastest has been by the bed for a month and is invaluable at helping me understand why I am being asked to do what the coach asks.

5. My kick is horrible - like a dad, in a holiday swimming pool, showing off!!!!

6. I find this website invaluable - damn it - why are American things always better than British things!!!


And back to the thread--------Swimming Fastest!!

Richard

Sharpsburger
December 18th, 2009, 10:31 AM
Just an update... I'm still digging the books.

When I cleaned off the kitchen table a while back, I moved them, then realized I'd stopped reading, so I started again.

ETA: I carry them in my briefcase now.

Just picked up another tip from "Mastering Swimming" -- listen to the arm entry on the freestyle.

I thought my entry was fine, but I listened, and sure enough heard a "plop".

So I changed my hand angle to match some of the photos, and used my own water sense and my ears to adjust.

Immediately took a stroke off my pool length.

Awesomeness!

qbrain
December 18th, 2009, 10:42 AM
Just an update... I'm still digging the books.

When I cleaned off the kitchen table a while back, I moved them, then realized I'd stopped reading, so I started again.

ETA: I carry them in my briefcase now.

Just picked up another tip from "Mastering Swimming" -- listen to the arm entry on the freestyle.

I thought my entry was fine, but I listened, and sure enough heard a "plop".

So I changed my hand angle to match some of the photos, and used my own water sense and my ears to adjust.

Immediately took a stroke off my pool length.

Awesomeness!

Very cool.

Kristen
December 18th, 2009, 10:55 AM
Thanks for the post... I totally relate!

I swam competitively for 8 years as a kid. 5 of those years I was training 5 hours a day, 6 days a week. At one point I moved to Florida to swim for Mark Schubert at Mission Bay. I was swimming at a very high level, but got totally burnt out, and quit when I was 16. I'm now 34 and just started swimming again. I am loving being in the pool again... and trying to figure out how to get myself back into shape. I'm also 'sans coach' as the masters swim team in my area practices at 5am (I am currently a graduate student working on my thesis... 5am is just TOO early).

These forums are a great place for inspiration and motivation. Thanks again!

Sharpsburger
December 30th, 2009, 03:27 PM
Another breakthrough from Mastering Swimming.

Over the past week I used their method to teach myself butterfly!

What a great book. I highly recommend it to anyone who's starting out, moving from fitness to competition, or getting back in the pool after a long time out.

I haven't delved into Breakthrough Swimming much yet, and am looking forward to exploring that one more thoroughly.

I have Swimming Fastest on my kitchen table and am slowing making progress.

Just got Swimming Anatomy, too, and am quite impressed.

ande
December 30th, 2009, 04:02 PM
I always recommend Swim Faster Faster
It's simple direct helpful and the tips really work.
Hope to have an actual book for folks in 2010.

in a different thread I mentioned these.

here were some suggestions for books about swimming:

Jon Urbanchek recommended the Talent Code (http://tr.im/talentcode) but it's not about swimming

Here's several that caught my eye as I browsed


Swimming Fastest
~ Ernest W. Maglischo (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0736031804?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0736031804)


Age Is Just a Number:
Achieve Your Dreams at Any Stage in Your Life
~ Dara Torres (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0767931904?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0767931904)


Complete Conditioning for Swimming
~ Dave Salo (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/073607242X?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=073607242X)


Triathlon Swimming Made Easy: The Total Immersion Way for Anyone to Master Open-Water Swimming (Paperback)


Extraordinary Swimming For Every Body - a Total Immersion instructional book ~ Terry Laughlin


Slow Fat Triathlete: Live Your Athletic Dreams in the Body You Have Now ~ Jayne Williams


No Limits: The Will to Succeed
~ Michael Phelps (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002BWQ4VE?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=B002BWQ4VE)


Beneath the Surface
~ Michael Phelps (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1596703520?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=1596703520)


Mastering Swimming (Masters Athlete)
~ Mo Chambers (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0736074538?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0736074538)


Young Woman and the Sea: How Trudy Ederle Conquered the English Channel and Inspired the World ~ Glenn Stout


The New Rules of Lifting: Six Basic Moves for Maximum Muscle
~ Lou Schuler (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/158333338X?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=158333338X)

The Ultimate Guide To Weight Training For Swimming (Ultimate Guide to Weight Training for Swimming) (Ultimate Guide to Weight Training for Swimming) (Ultimate Guide to Weight Training for Swimming) ~ Robert G. Price


Gold in the Water: The True Story of Ordinary Men and Their Extraordinary Dream of Olympic Glory ~ P. H. Mullen


Fitness Swimming, Second Edition
~ Emmett W. Hines (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0736074570?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0736074570)


Golden Girl: How Natalie Coughlin Fought Back, Challenged Conventional Wisdom, and Became America's Olympic Champion
~ Michael Silver (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1594862540?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=1594862540)


Masters Swimming: A Manual
~ Blythe Lucero (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1841261858?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=1841261858)


The Swim Coaching Bible
~ Dick Hannula (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0736036466?ie=UTF8&tag=ifsande-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0736036466)


The Man Who Swam the Amazon: 3,274 Miles on the World's Deadliest River ~ Matthew Mohlke

That Guy
May 12th, 2010, 04:08 PM
http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/lane9/news/24155.asp

Check it out, Jeff Commings' autobiography! Order through that site and get an autographed copy. How many other Masters swimmers have written books about swimming? Terry Laughlin... Jim Montgomery... it's gotta be a very short list.

Lui
May 12th, 2010, 04:47 PM
Does anybody know this book?
Amazon.com: The 100 Best Swimming Drills (9781841262161): Blythe Lucero: Books

Sharpsburger
May 14th, 2010, 09:50 AM
I asked about that book once before, but got no responses.

If anyone can recommend a good drills book (one or two, please, not a dozen) I'd appreciate it b/c I need to concentrate on form for the next few months.

SolarEnergy
May 14th, 2010, 01:14 PM
I asked about that book once before, but got no responses.

If anyone can recommend a good drills book (one or two, please, not a dozen) I'd appreciate it b/c I need to concentrate on form for the next few months. What strokes are you interested in? What's your level (e.g. PB over 100m, PB over 1500)?

Sharpsburger
May 16th, 2010, 03:35 PM
What strokes are you interested in? What's your level (e.g. PB over 100m, PB over 1500)?

All 4 strokes.

Just now learning butterfly. Never did get the rhythm down when I swam competitively as a lad, but "Mastering Swimming" allowed me to teach myself how to do it. But I still splash around too much and can't do any distance to speak of.

I don't know what "PB" means. If you're asking about racing distance, endurance is not my strength, but I'd like to get better at it.

TriBob
May 16th, 2010, 05:14 PM
All 4 strokes.

Just now learning butterfly. Never did get the rhythm down when I swam competitively as a lad, but "Mastering Swimming" allowed me to teach myself how to do it. But I still splash around too much and can't do any distance to speak of.

I don't know what "PB" means. If you're asking about racing distance, endurance is not my strength, but I'd like to get better at it.

I just got a copy of "Mastering Swimming." Glad to hear it was helpful.

androvski
May 16th, 2010, 05:14 PM
I don't know what "PB" means. If you're asking about racing distance, endurance is not my strength, but I'd like to get better at it.
Personal best.

Sharpsburger
May 17th, 2010, 08:18 AM
I just got a copy of "Mastering Swimming." Glad to hear it was helpful.

It's been very helpful. I love that book. "Breakthrough Swimming" as well.

Sharpsburger
May 17th, 2010, 08:22 AM
Personal best.

I don't know. I'm not timing myself at this point.

I'm using a 4-stage plan to get myself back up to competitive level. The first 6 months I just acclimated myself to in-water workouts again. Now I'm focusing on form. (That was supposed to last 6 months, but may be extended since a heart procedure interrupted my progress.)

I'm not going to start working on speed until the next 6-month phase, which will be roughly the first part of 2011. Following that, I'll spend another 6 months developing power.

I figure at that point, I'll be ready to start competing again.

Sharpsburger
May 25th, 2010, 04:05 PM
Hmm. That must've been the wrong answer.

jgale
May 27th, 2010, 09:11 PM
I have been using Blythe Lucero's swim drills book and like it alot. Good progressions, excellent photos, and good tips.

Sharpsburger
May 28th, 2010, 04:56 PM
Cool. Thanks.