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Surferboy
September 25th, 2009, 11:56 AM
I'm happy with the progress I have made after about 5 weeks in the pool. However, as a newbie, I feel terrible for the other swimmer that gets stuck with me in their lane. One program I joined is made up of moderately serious swimmers and the club I joined is a 5:30-6:30 AM group of serious swimmers.

All the swimmers are very pleasant and helpful, but am I'm I viewed as a major distraction and barely tolerated? And if so, am I better off swimming by myself until I can keep up? I'm hesitant to go to the Sat. morning 5:30 club training because there may be more than 2 swimmers per lane. Thanks for your honest answers. Steve

aquageek
September 25th, 2009, 12:03 PM
Just go, it all gets sorted out.

Chris Stevenson
September 25th, 2009, 12:18 PM
Keep going.

One team I practice with on occasion will set aside an entire lane for an elderly woman who used swimming to recover from rhumatoid arthritis. No one ever complained in the least. (Probably worried about thunderbolts from above if they were so churlish.)

swimmj
September 25th, 2009, 01:01 PM
Keep going. Ask any questions you have. As long as you are reasonably pleasant, you will be welcomed with open arms. And soon you will one of the ones answering "newbie" questions.

dorothyrde
September 25th, 2009, 01:32 PM
Keep going! As long as you are not swimming down the middle and allowing no one to pass, they are not bothered by you! Chlorine is universal with swimmers. We love anyone who loves it.

__steve__
September 25th, 2009, 02:23 PM
am I'm I viewed as a major distraction and barely tolerated?
You got to start somewhere. I went to my first team practice last week.

Bobinator
September 25th, 2009, 03:30 PM
What makes you think you bother people?
If you are lots slower just modify the distances of the intervals so you still feel like part of the group...example: If the fast people are doing 10 X 100 on the 1:20 interval I would do 10 X 75. You would be stopping at the opposite end every other time but you could still experience the workout with the team and on their signals. Gradually you would start building into doing parts of the workout at their pace, then as you tire revert back to distance reduction.
ALSO, if you stick with it you may motivate another NEWBIE to join the team. If that happens a few times you could qualify to have a whole lane. :applaud:

ourswimmer
September 25th, 2009, 05:01 PM
Nobody whose opinion should matter to you is going to think you are a pain just because you are slower than they are. They may not share a lane with you, but that wouldn't be because they "barely tolerate" you. It would be because if you have (say) three people at one speed and one at another, everyone will probably get a better workout if you divide up 3/1 than 2/2.


I think being pleasant and not swimming down the middle are necessary, but not sufficient, to fit into a crowded workout. I have a few other tips.

If you do have to share a lane with people who are faster than you are, make sure you are in the right position in your lane. That position might usually be "last," but maybe not always depending on what everyone is doing.
If you have to skip some to keep up (which is not the best compromise, but maybe it is the only thing that will work in your particular group), don't get in the way at the wall.
Be sure that you understand the set, even if that means asking about the jargon, but don't hold up the entire group if you are not ready to go when they are.
Learn to do breaststroke without kicking way wider than your body, or don't do it when you are sharing a lane. (Kicking your teammates in the ribs over and over again does build ill will.)
Get to practice on time so that people can sort themselves into appropriate lanes right from warmup.
All these tactics plus being pleasant at 5:30 am should make you a respected and valued member of your team regardless of speed.

jim clemmons
September 25th, 2009, 06:01 PM
I think being pleasant and not swimming down the middle are necessary, but not sufficient, to fit into a crowded workout. I have a few other tips.

If you do have to share a lane with people who are faster than you are, make sure you are in the right position in your lane. That position might usually be "last," but maybe not always depending on what everyone is doing.
If you have to skip some to keep up (which is not the best compromise, but maybe it is the only thing that will work in your particular group), don't get in the way at the wall.
Be sure that you understand the set, even if that means asking about the jargon, but don't hold up the entire group if you are not ready to go when they are.
Learn to do breaststroke without kicking way wider than your body, or don't do it when you are sharing a lane. (Kicking your teammates in the ribs over and over again does build ill will.)
Get to practice on time so that people can sort themselves into appropriate lanes right from warmup.
All these tactics plus being pleasant at 5:30 am should make you a respected and valued member of your team regardless of speed.

We should especially share the point about arriving on time with our own team. Not only does it make it more palatable for the swimmers, it helps float the coaches attitude, as well. Almost nothing can crash a coaches 'tude than trying to fit in late swimmers at oh dark thirty.

orca1946
September 26th, 2009, 04:44 PM
We are not ALL going to be fast forever !! Stay with it, the coach will adjust for you & others.

Surferboy
September 26th, 2009, 06:17 PM
I greatly appreciate all the comments and suggestions - particularly re: arriving at practice on time. I didn't feel so guilty yesterday when I was dog paddling in the slow lane by myself and there were 3 in the lane next to me. I was 15 minutes early, though. It helped, too, that I bought one swimmer coffee after practice.

Oz, I'd love to pick your brain some time. I live in Batavia and recently turned 63. And although Chris Colburn is one super coach and very patient with my stupid questions, he's one busy man. Maybe we can get together some time. I swim at Delnor a few days a week.

Thanks,
Steve