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View Full Version : Knowing how to swim, and when not to



ViveBene
September 27th, 2009, 08:17 AM
Knowing how to swim could save your life, as could knowing when not to.

From:cool: the National Park Service's Morning Report:

On August 14th, off-duty surfguard Kelly Werner and off-duty visitor use assistant James Keena were involved in an after hours rescue of a family at Jacob Riis Park. Both off duty employees were fully dressed. Werner and another park visitor saved the lives of a mother and child while Keena assisted with the rescue. Werner returned to the surf after the second rescue to rescue the father. Keena then proceeded to give CPR to the victim until medical help arrived.

Riis Park, an ocean beach near Breezy Point, is in the Jamaica Bay Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area. It is estimated that 9 out of 10 visitors to the beaches in the New York area cannot swim."

Another recent NPS Morning Report noted that 3 swimmers were caught in a rip tide off Cape Hatteras, NC. Other swimmers managed to bring them to shore, but one died.

__steve__
September 27th, 2009, 08:29 AM
Yep, doesn't matter how well you swim, a current can easily overcome you and we can't live without air.

Being a good swimmer will increase your chance of survival once in a bad condition, but increases the chance your in the bad condition in the first place.

nyswimmer
September 27th, 2009, 01:38 PM
Yeah. It seems like we were hearing stories like this several times a week all summer in New York. The water's been especially rough this year and some people just don't listen to warnings to stay out, and even go into the ocean with no lifeguard on duty. It seems like in most of the incidents it's people who don't know how to swim who ignore the warnings. (I suppose swimmers understand the danger better.) Unfortunately, there have been a few fatalities.

Georgio
September 27th, 2009, 01:43 PM
And any rescue attempt puts you at great peril.....even when you are well trained.

flyincip
September 27th, 2009, 05:32 PM
It is a shame that more people do not know how to swim especially when they visit waterfronts of any kind. What makes it worse is that some people chose not to heed the warnings because it might affect their good time. There have been several times where kids have gotten in trouble and I have had to go and save them because their parents are not paying attention.

Allen Stark
September 27th, 2009, 05:58 PM
People are amazing in their lack of awareness.Every year in Oregon we have several river drownings of people who don't know how to swim and wade into the rivers on hot days.
By the way,if you can swim and hypothermia is not an issue,"undertow" is not a big issue as long as you know what to do and don't panic.Yes it will knock you off your feet and sweep you out faster than you can swim in,but they are not very wide so swim parallel to shore til it stops and then swim in.

orca1946
September 28th, 2009, 11:51 AM
As a H S teacher, I am amazed at the kids that are allowed not to get their faces wet in swim class!! How do they let kids out of school without being able to save themselves??

knelson
September 29th, 2009, 01:03 PM
As a H S teacher, I am amazed at the kids that are allowed not to get their faces wet in swim class!! How do they let kids out of school without being able to save themselves??

This topic came up here before and I suggested that learning to swim should be a part of every school curriculum. Many people thought this was a waste of valuable educational time and/or impractical. I think swimming is a life skill and just as important as anything else taught in school.

joel schmaltz
September 29th, 2009, 01:50 PM
Living close to the water here in North Myrtle Beach it is very important to respect the water. I have two children that were put in swimmng lessons at a very young age for that very reason. As tourist season comes in, story after story of someones bad fortune playing in the water plaster our six o'clock news. I consider myself a good swimmer and am very comfortable in the water but I have had the current take me right down the beach and there was nothing I could do about it.

swimmj
September 29th, 2009, 02:17 PM
This topic came up here before and I suggested that learning to swim should be a part of every school curriculum. Many people thought this was a waste of valuable educational time and/or impractical. I think swimming is a life skill and just as important as anything else taught in school.

Our local school district has a min 2 week swimming class mandated for all 2nd grade students. Many schools choose to fund swimming lessons for other grades as well. We live in an area of rivers and lakes, so swimming is a basic survival skill. I'm really pleased with the schools. I also taught for the local parks and rec, before I started coaching on the team. Safety was a major focus as well as the basics of how to breath, and do the strokes.