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geochuck
October 10th, 2009, 11:21 AM
In the 50s I was tested along with several Canadian swimmers. They tested many things to measure the body conditioning to determine the reason we were able to swim. They found that I was the not best conditioned person there, as a matter of fact they said I was not fit at all. They checked for floating ability and I was a level floater. When streatched out my heels showed at the top of the water, bum showed, back showed, back of head showed, arms showed.

They tested my lung capacity and they told me that I had the largest lung capacity that they had ever tested. I am sure they found many after that that had a larger lung capcity.

The Olympic trials came up in 1956 and I had been out of the water for several weeks. My coach entered me in the trials to swim in a few events, relays etc. I was selected for the 1956 Olympic team to swim the 100 free and the 200 Fly as I won both trial events.

Did I swim well because I was considered to be a floater? Did my large lung capacity help? Was it my stroke technique that helped? or was it just luck?

qbrain
October 10th, 2009, 12:10 PM
Did I swim well because I was considered to be a floater? Did my large lung capacity help? Was it my stroke technique that helped? or was it just luck?

Because you were Canadian?

geochuck
October 10th, 2009, 12:20 PM
It was Northwestern University that did the testing of the Canadian swim team.

In 1956 I would have also qualified for the USA team for the 100 free.

notsofast
October 10th, 2009, 08:09 PM
Did I swim well because I was considered to be a floater? Did my large lung capacity help? Was it my stroke technique that helped? or was it just luck?
Yes, but not necessarily in that order.

SolarEnergy
October 11th, 2009, 12:32 PM
Lung capacity is something that makes a big difference on buoyancy. Buoyancy makes a big difference on performances (ask swim suit manufacturers).

For what it's worth, and it only applies to myself I do not coach or recommend this, I am a breath holder. I blow as little bubbles as possible especially when swimming 2beat kick free style. I know I know... It's bad. But it helps me staying at the surface which comes in handy when using minimal kicking.

So I rather take little more time in breathing position to inhale/exhale in favor of a little more buoyancy.

Don't do this though.:oldman:

geochuck
October 11th, 2009, 12:38 PM
I held my breath then just before taking in a breath I did explosive exhalation then I took my breath in.

SolarEnergy
October 11th, 2009, 12:48 PM
I held my breath then just before taking in a breath I did explosive exhalation then I took my breath in. Ha ha!!!! You too cheat!!!

This is exactly what I do in fact.

Who knows, maybe this big bathing suit debate will have the tendency to bring more swimmers to consider embracing this shameful flaw :)

In the meantime, you certainly won't see me defending this position though.

__steve__
October 11th, 2009, 07:28 PM
I bet severe intestinal gas can really help performance (not a joke). It places the bouancy fulcrum further back.

funkyfish
October 12th, 2009, 08:17 AM
I bet severe intestinal gas can really help performance (not a joke). It places the bouancy fulcrum further back.
Note to self: Eat more beans and radishes before next swim meet.
:bliss:

geochuck
October 12th, 2009, 09:05 AM
East Germans used injected air in the lower regions in the 70s.

SolarEnergy
October 12th, 2009, 09:21 AM
Note to self: Eat more beans and radishes before next swim meet.
:bliss: food for thoughts


East Germans used injected air in the lower regions in the 70s. How so, with a bicycle pump?

swim4me
October 13th, 2009, 05:57 PM
East Germans used injected air in the lower regions in the 70s.


Ewwwwwwwwwwwww.:eeew: