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View Full Version : Getting EVF to "stick"



smontanaro
October 21st, 2009, 06:44 PM
I like freestyle catch-up drill for working on my EVF zen, and while doing the drill I attain enlightenment. Catch, and that hand drops, the elbow stays up, and ... whoosh! ... strong pull, and I feel myself accelerate (or at least it feels like the water moves past my body faster).

However, that sensation disappears as I get further and further from the catch-up drill (almost catch-up, front quadrant stroke, no pause before catch). How do I stay in the EVF zone as I move from drill to normal stroke? Or should I just always swim (almost?) catch-up???

Sorry, no video...

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Ahelee Sue Osborn
October 22nd, 2009, 09:47 AM
No matter how fast you are swimming, try to feel your hand glide before and at the catch, right at the water's surface.

Make a quick mental check that your hand is near the surface with the fingers beginning to press toward the bottom. That position should put your elbow slightly higher than your hand.

SolarEnergy
October 22nd, 2009, 10:59 AM
However, that sensation disappears as I get further and further from the catch-up drill (almost catch-up, front quadrant stroke, no pause before catch). How do I stay in the EVF zone as I move from drill to normal stroke? Or should I just always swim (almost?) catch-up???

What an interesting little question here.

The mere fact that you're wondering about this kinds of suggest that you're in the right direction. Your issue probably relates to timing.

Timing the FreeStyle isn't as easy as most would think. There are a lot of elements going on in the same time, all of them requiring to be in sych with the others.

Breathing, arm entry, catch, kick timing, body rotation etc.

What probably happens is this.

By slowing down your timing (e.g. slowish catchup pace), you allow yourself enough time to flex the wrist, drop the hand (before the elbow), catch and pull. The first phases are done *unweighted* - that is, with minimal pressure under the palm of your hand. Let me be clear on this. After hand entry, given that you're performing Catchup (one arm at the time basically), you move your hand down with elbow EVF without applying and force, then after the catch is made you apply some force and accelerate the hand throughout the remaining of the pulling path.

When you quit the Catchup Zone, when you swim full stroke, you may loose this. Your hand probably waits little too long in the front (after hand entry). If the hand waits too long in the front, then that leaves you less time to complete the pulling. Bare in mind that the other arm imposes a certain rhythm. After having waited too long in the front, you have little choice but applying more pressure to the early phases of the pulling.

Too much pressure (too much force, or power whatever name you give to it) in the early phases of the pulling path will compromise your ability to EVF (for certain reasons).

The solution is to learn to start pulling little earlier. After hand entry, your hand doesn't have to move rapidly, but it should immediately start its positioning process. Immediately after hand entry think about flexing the wrist then dropping the hand/forearm. You do it slowly - with no weight no pressure no power applied. That way your EVF should stick little more.

ande
October 22nd, 2009, 11:22 AM
Grind it In (http://www.usms.org/forums/showpost.php?p=196569&postcount=1282)

SolarEnergy
October 22nd, 2009, 11:33 AM
Grind it In (http://www.usms.org/forums/showpost.php?p=196569&postcount=1282)very good suggestion Ande, the best way to go IMO.

Myself I draw a link between swim and learning a musical instrument (that's because I am a musician myself). Bottom line is that like golfer, or musicians learning the Violin or the Piano or Guitar (whatever), a swimmer that is learning a new ability should practice it at very slow speed first, then increasing the speed gradually.

funkyfish
October 22nd, 2009, 02:06 PM
For what it's worth, I've found that alternating between methodical catch-up drilling and normal recovery has worked well for me. I'll use the catch-up to grind correct aspects of swimming (body position, evf, kick timing, head position, etc.), then focus on one of those items for every 25yd length. Every once in a while my "regular" swimming will have many of the items click, and it feels "faster with less effort." I've managed to reduce my full-stroke spl from 13 to 11 on average in the course of 2 years. Currently I've been able to reduce my spl to 10 with a little more glide. The stroke rhythm is uniform, just slower paced. This imprinting seems to help with 25yd sprints, when turn-over is much faster my spl goes up to 13-15, and I'm finally able to see some :12s and an occasional :11.5 on my 25yd sprints.
:bliss:

smontanaro
October 22nd, 2009, 03:28 PM
Thanks for the responses. I will start working a bit more on this at practice tonight.

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