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ViveBene
December 5th, 2009, 06:20 PM
And would you travel to Illinois, central or northern part of state, for one?

I. What is a cable swim? I had imagined a nice corruscated bit of cable left over from a pulley operation of some sort, a historic site, if you will, lying on the lake bed, but if the water is disturbed and you can't see your hand in front of your face, how do you identify the course?

II. If everyone is supposed to swim over the cable, or along a string of surface buoys as the visible manifestation thereof, how do you keep from kicking each other?

III. Semi-hypothetically, and assuming a cable equivalent were to materialize, would you participate in a cable swim in a lake in central or northern Illinois? 2 miles? 10 miles? What makes a successful experience?

IV. Would you come out for a nice OW swim, not in Lake Michigan, even w/o the corruscated links? Fireflies, beach food, ice out.
:)

Thanks for all responses.

Chris Stevenson
December 5th, 2009, 06:45 PM
I. What is a cable swim? I had imagined a nice corruscated bit of cable left over from a pulley operation of some sort, a historic site, if you will, lying on the lake bed, but if the water is disturbed and you can't see your hand in front of your face, how do you identify the course?

The "cable" is a straight rope, cable or something similar. It can lie on top of the water (like a lane line) or underneath (like the line on the bottom of the pool). In either case there will be buoys attached floating on the surface, and larger buoys marking the ends.

If the water is clear you can see it underwater easily enough. If not then you use the buoys. It isn't a big issue.

The Chris Greene Lake Swim in Charlottesville, VA is a cable swim. The website is here:

http://www.cableswim.org/

If you go to "About" and scroll down you can see a layout of the course.



II. If everyone is supposed to swim over the cable, or along a string of surface buoys as the visible manifestation thereof, how do you keep from kicking each other?

It isn't different than any other OW swim in this regard. You pay attention and pick your line around or between swimmers that you are passing. Swimmers being passed need to avoid sudden direction course changes.


III. Semi-hypothetically, and assuming a cable equivalent were to materialize, would you participate in a cable swim in a lake in central or northern Illinois? 2 miles? 10 miles? What makes a successful experience?

A cable swim is similar to any other OW swim except:

(a) it is easier to swim straight,
(b) there can be national records, and
(c) you are more likely to run into traffic (since you go around the cable several times and faster swimmers catch/lap slower swimmers).

In some ways a cable swim is a nice way to introduce pool swimmers to the OW experience since it is a little bit of a hybrid of the two: you are less likely to swim off-course (though I have seen people do it) and maybe there is some reassurance to having the cable there.

I guess the same things that make ANY open water race would make it successful.

Since national records are kept, you have to certify the measurement of the course using a surveyor (just like pools have to be measured) if you anticipate submitting any times as records.

And you have to consider the spacing of the waves: far enough apart for the next wave to get to the starting line, but not so far apart that lapping of slower swimmers becomes excessive. If the race size is anticipated to be large, you can have two heats, one swimming clockwise (favoring those who prefer to breathe on the right) and the other counterclockwise (for left-breathers).


IV. Would you come out for a nice OW swim, not in Lake Michigan, even w/o the corruscated links? Fireflies, beach food, ice out.

Probably not, though not because it is (or isn't) a cable swim. Have fun!

ViveBene
December 5th, 2009, 06:57 PM
Thank you, Chris! A huge response.
:applaud:

Marjorie