PDA

View Full Version : Eat or not before swimming in Early Morning?



nhc
February 16th, 2010, 04:46 PM
Is there any harm if you don't eat anything before swimming at 5am, 6am (though I suppose that's what most early swimmers do)?

Speedo
February 16th, 2010, 04:58 PM
I think there was a similar thread on this recently. Either that or I tend to blabber on regardless of the thread topic.

I only have a cup of coffee before a 445-615am workout, and never feel hungry until about 7:30am or so. I don't feel like the system can digest anything at that hour anyway, and I don't want it coming up during practice.

qbrain
February 16th, 2010, 04:59 PM
Are you asking for medical advice? :angel:

I am not going to answer your question, sorry, but I do believe I have read, and it makes sense, that you do want to consume something before workout. This is not to prevent harm, but provide more energy for the workout.

You are in a fasted state, so your circulating blood sugar is fairly low, especially when you could have cake for breakfast (http://i.ytimg.com/vi/4K5YBNQq-Qo/0.jpg). In an ideal situation, fat can provide you with 480 calories/hour, and then the rest has to be in your liver and muscles already. If you assume a very hard workout burns 1200 calories/hour, a long hard workout might be a problem if you don't eat first, and I don't think you achieve max fat burn rate as easy as hopping into warm up.

I drink orange juice pre workout now. I have been warned against this because its acidic nature, but I have an acidic nature at 4am when I am drinking it, so it happens to work for me.

qbrain
February 16th, 2010, 05:01 PM
Speedo is correct, this thread has been started before.

http://www.usms.org/forums/showthread.php?t=14374 (http://www.usms.org/forums/showthread.php?t=14374&highlight=breakfast)

Lump
February 16th, 2010, 05:12 PM
I eat nothing. Drink a Gatorade or water during my workout. Eat bowl of cereal when I get to work followed by a mid-morning protein bar.

nhc
February 16th, 2010, 05:37 PM
Thanks, I didn't know there was an earlier thread on this. However this thread is slightly different. The previous thread simply asks what each person eats. I would like know what science says :) .

Some factors to be considered:

-Swimming immediately or too soon after eating is not good (for digestion and maybe other reasons). But I doubt anyone who gets up at 5am would wait an hour after eating to go swimming. :cool:

-If you don't eat anything, will the high intensity swim deplete your muscles (if you don't have too much fat)? I seem to have read somewhere along this line.

-One of the wikiAnswers linked by a post in that previous discussion says that even if you eat shortly before swimming, your energy would still come from what was already in your digestive system, rather than what you had just eaten. Not sure if this is so, but possible.

debaru
February 16th, 2010, 05:50 PM
If I eat anything other than half of a banana just prior to my weekday 6:00 AM workouts (I get up at 5:15) I feel sick. If I eat before I swim (for example, whole-grain cereal w/milk and fruit), I usually wait 2 hours before hitting the pool. Two hours seems to be my threshold.

After my workout, I consume a protein shake within 45 minutes while still in the gym. I then consume the other half of my banana that is waiting for me in the car, followed by granola bars at work. This weekday routine seems to be working for me. I feel great and am steadily improving in my workouts.

aquageek
February 16th, 2010, 06:03 PM
I eat nothing. Drink a Gatorade or water during my workout. Eat bowl of cereal when I get to work followed by a mid-morning protein bar.

Exactly the same here, weird.

pwb
February 16th, 2010, 06:09 PM
I would like know what science says :) . Science is great for what works on average or in most cases, but you should do what works for you. For me, it's a high fat yogurt (Brown Cow cream top!) with fruit in it (to make me believe there's something healthy happening) and 1 or 2 shots of espresso. Works wonders most times. Sometimes, 3 shots of espresso have been required.:anim_coffee:

makesense
February 16th, 2010, 06:12 PM
Science is great for what works on average or in most cases, but you should do what works for you

A pearl of wisdom.

As for food....got to eat.

knelson
February 16th, 2010, 06:18 PM
-Swimming immediately or too soon after eating is not good

Are you sure about that? Always seemed like an old wives tale to me. If eating immediately before swimming doesn't bother you then I see no reason not to.

ande
February 16th, 2010, 06:24 PM
i prefer to not eat before practice

uknick
February 16th, 2010, 06:25 PM
At 5am before a 6am swim I have a large cup of tea with two spoons of sugar (the only hot drink of the day I take with sugar) This I believe helps to wake me up and get my brain working...

I am not sure that there is consensus around pre training food and studies show a mixed results from both complex and simple carbs pre workout. It does depend on the type of workout as low intensity will burn predominantly fat and high intensity glycogen... You can consume sugars during the workout as the body will metabolise without the unwanted insulin reaction.

Of course post heavy exercise good to initially load with some simple carbs (high GI) I eat bread sandwiches with peanut butter and marmite - then after that a protein shake! :bump:

hedgehog
February 16th, 2010, 06:49 PM
In an exercise phys. class i took recently we were taught that the food you eat the day/night before is what you are using for energy the next day. The food you eat right before a workout will not be used by your body until later on in the day.

There have been studies done on eating and performance. The studies show that digesting food inhibits performance. The blood that would be going to your muscles is now going to your digestive organs when you eat close to exercising.The subjects with the longest fasting times had the best performance.

Anything high intensity will deplete your muscles regardless of your body fat. A "recovery drink" is recommended after a workout with a ratio of 4:1 carbs/protein 15-45 minutes after finishing. A drink is best because is does not take a lot of energy to digest.The timing is crucial because it will speed up your recovery. your muscles are aching to be fed. A higher protein shake should be follwed in a hour.

I had a hard time finding this type of information on my own so I took some exercise sciene classes at the local community college.I am glad I did. Though I will say, as with anything, different people have different things that work for them.

Lump
February 16th, 2010, 07:29 PM
Exactly the same here, weird.

I go with the Special K Red Berries. And I prefer the Orange Gatorade:D

nhc
February 16th, 2010, 10:17 PM
Science is great for what works on average or in most cases, but you should do what works for you.

True. It's just that I hope to make whatever is scientific work for me. :D


Are you sure about that?

I've read it in many places. Most say don't swim/exercise within 1 hour after a meal (perhaps snacks is ok). You will probably stumble upon them one day.

hedgehog, thanks for sharing what you learned from your class. That's just the kind of things I was trying to find.

funkyfish
February 16th, 2010, 11:32 PM
On the rare occasion that I do a 5 or 6 am workout, I've done some swims on an empty stomach and some with a light snack eaten 20 minutes before (the time it takes me to get to the pool). I haven't had problems either way. Lately I've been drinking a sports drink before my swim, but even before that I've always drank about 8-12 oz of water to hydrate a bit before my swim (this is for the morning swims). If I do eat anything it's just because my stomach "feels empty," not really for any kind of energy.:D

joshua
February 17th, 2010, 12:23 AM
I have been doing 05:00 w/o's for years. I get up at 04:30 and eat nothing. I have had absolutely no energy problems. I do eat a good breakfast after the w/o. Most of us have enough energy reserves to take us through a 60-90 minute session.

swimshark
February 17th, 2010, 07:32 AM
I have been doing 4:30am workouts for about 4 years now. If I don't eat something before, I die during the workout. I eat a banana as soon as I get up, which is about 30 min before the workout begins.

qbrain
February 17th, 2010, 11:47 AM
Are you sure about that? Always seemed like an old wives tale to me. If eating immediately before swimming doesn't bother you then I see no reason not to.

If you don't wait 30 minutes after eating, you will sink to the bottom of the pool.

qbrain
February 17th, 2010, 11:53 AM
In an exercise phys. class i took recently we were taught that the food you eat the day/night before is what you are using for energy the next day. The food you eat right before a workout will not be used by your body until later on in the day.


If you take a blood sample in a fasted state, drink a high glucose beverage, then take a series of blood samples, what happens to the blood glucose?

I agree that the food you ate several hours ago or more provides the stored energy, but you can dump energy into your blood stream almost instantly via your stomach.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Suckale08_fig3_glucose_insulin_day.jpg

Sharpsburger
February 17th, 2010, 12:04 PM
Waking up and working out without eating would be impossible for me.

Even doing my swim (or lift) at mid-day, I have to have some oatmeal with walnuts and maple syrup a couple hours before, on top of my breakfast (which I eat as soon as I get up in the morning). Otherwise, I run into serious blood sugar problems.

I'll check our databases when I have a chance and see if I can find any hard research on this.

It doesn't seem to me that a hard workout while fasting is a good idea for anybody, but I may very well be wrong.

knelson
February 17th, 2010, 12:51 PM
If you don't wait 30 minutes after eating, you will sink to the bottom of the pool.

I always thought the line was that you'd get a cramp!

qbrain
February 17th, 2010, 12:57 PM
I always thought the line was that you'd get a cramp!

I think we might have had different moms. Is your mom named Mom too?

Hmm...

Stevepowell
February 17th, 2010, 01:06 PM
From the old thread:
http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/sportsnutrition/a/EatForExercise.htm

USA-S:
http://www.usaswimming.org/USASWeb/ViewMiscArticle.aspx?TabId=144&Alias=Rainbow&Lang=en&mid=4348&ItemId=3467

Does anyone put butter on their oatmeal?

funkyfish
February 17th, 2010, 03:27 PM
If you don't wait 30 minutes after eating, you will sink to the bottom of the pool.
I was always told that the effect was more long term, as in, "if you don't wait 30 minutes after eating, you will die 80-90 years down the road".

debaru
February 17th, 2010, 05:08 PM
I always thought the line was that you'd get a cramp!

Add to that "and you'll drown", and that's what I was told as a kid, over and over again. I can still hear my Mom say "You just ate, don't go in the water for an hour!"

In all my years of swimming (pool, ocean, lakes, whatever), I have never experienced a cramp. I am either just not prone to getting them, or maybe I'm doing something right (for me) by not eating much before I work out.

2fish&1whale
February 17th, 2010, 05:58 PM
My kids have evening practices and usually eat a mid size meal an hour before-I try to keep the food light,but one is a teenage boy and he puts food away like there is no tomorrow.I always worry that whatever they eat will end up floating in the gutter halfway through practice, but they have never complained of feeling sick or getting stomach cramps.
I on the other hand swim in the AM and in the past had to swim 'empty'-only fluids during swimming and then a decent breakfast.I have finaly conditioned myself to keep down coffee and a banana or half a bagel, but even then I have to wait 1 hour or I feel like stuff is sloshing around my stomach.
My feeling is, regardless of what science recomends here, if you need something(liquid or solid) to help your body work and your mind to focus then do it-but if it makes you feel sick it will reflect in the quality of your workout.

pendaluft
February 17th, 2010, 06:14 PM
Twice, when I was 14, and attending a swim camp where practice came after breakfast, I ate a big meal before the pool and puked during practice. It only happened twice...

These days, at 5:00am I have a cup of coffee and (maybe) a banana or a cracker.. I started drinking water during my swim which helps a lot...if its a longer workout than 45 minutes, I drink gatorade during my swim-- otherwise I eat when I come home.

It was 2 hours after eating before you were allowed in the lake when I was a kid -- but I always ignored it. I never puked in the lake, just at swim camp.

Sharpsburger
February 17th, 2010, 09:33 PM
Surprisingly, so far I've come up with nothing on this.

I did run across an interesting entry in Richard Nikoley's blog in which he reports no ill effects from heavy workouts while fasting, and notes that this should not be surprising, since it would be odd if mammals evolved in any other way, considering that hunting is usually done when hungry.

Which reminded me of an article I read recently via Science Daily which reports that mammals actually are more energetic when hungry, presumably for exactly this reason.

That logic doesn't work for me personally, but then again I know that my system is all messed up.

But I find the evolutionary logic compelling.

I'll keep scrounging for research.

I am surprised that it's so difficult to find studies on this.

knelson
February 18th, 2010, 01:49 AM
I don't know, maybe it's as simple as: if you're hungry eat. I know I wouldn't want to start a workout feeling hungry. And I think there's also a difference between what you'd want to eat before a workout as opposed to (pool) competition where we're talking about events lasting seconds to minutes, not hours.

magick17
February 18th, 2010, 11:52 AM
we start at 5:15 am soo not b-fast for me.. i eat a good dose of protein with some fats the night before. I have to take a pill 1hr in the am before i eat so eating at 3:30am is no fun!!
I always eat after swimming.. usually a kaski roll bar..and lotsa of water

orca1946
February 20th, 2010, 01:03 AM
Something will fuel the practice, as long as it feels OK when you swim.

sjstuart
February 20th, 2010, 08:41 PM
I don't know, maybe it's as simple as: if you're hungry eat.

Good advice. You won't swim well if your gut isn't happy.

Personally, I don't eat anything before an early morning workout.

I have no doubt that I'd swim better if properly fueled, but I can't do it. My stomach is in no more mood to do any work before dawn than the rest of me is. When I try to make myself eat, the bagel or banana just sits on my car seat mostly uneaten on the way to the pool. If I'm exercising long enough to get hungry (I usually don't), I just opt for something with calories in my water bottle.

Science provides some constraints on personal preference, though.

Any pre-workout calories will take 30+ minutes to do you some good, depending on the type of food. Liquid sugary drinks (OJ, Gatorade, energy drinks, gels) are easily digested, and can contribute to muscle glycogen within 30 minutes. Eggs Benedict would take longer.

Digesting food does draw blood away from muscles, and decrease performance. If you doubt this, try sprinting on a full stomach. So you may not get cramps or drown, like our mothers warned us, but eating a big breakfast too soon before swimming could be counterproductive.

orca1946
February 21st, 2010, 05:02 PM
I did notice that too much orange juice causes me to have an upset feeling. After swim practice at home it is great .

Herb
February 22nd, 2010, 11:11 PM
This is part of the reason I just decided to give up swimming in the morning (again). It sucks because it is the most efficient time for me to do it but my body just can't handle it. I need coffee, potty, a nice long shower to wake up, food and then time to digest it. I had made it several months of early morning workouts this time - and I had never made it more than a couple weeks before in several other failed attempts over the years. I thought I really had a routine going this time and then one day a couple of weeks ago I just couldn't swim at all. Somedays feel better than others and I might cut a set short, but this was the only time I just could not do it - at all. Maybe it was just a bad day but I decided enough was enough.Sorry for my own lame story. I say do whatever works for you.

__steve__
February 23rd, 2010, 12:42 AM
Anyone try beer before a workout? It's a terrible thing.

nhc
February 23rd, 2010, 01:39 AM
Herb's reply reminds me of a question that sometimes occurs to me. Even though many people swim and do exercise in early morning, I wonder if it is really good to do intensive physical exercises right after you just got up from a long night's complete rest? I mean, from the most restful 8 hours or so, to suddenly engaging the most intensive physical activities? :rolleyes:

swimshark
February 23rd, 2010, 07:47 AM
Herb's reply reminds me of a question that sometimes occurs to me. Even though many people swim and do exercise in early morning, I wonder if it is really good to do intensive physical exercises right after you just got up from a long night's complete rest? I mean, from the most restful 8 hours or so, to suddenly engaging the most intensive physical activities? :rolleyes:

Personally, I love it. I'm a morning person so a good, early morning workout is perfect for me. Late night ones give me migraines the next day lately.

I swim at 4:45am. I get up at 4:10, go straight in to the bathroom to go, eat a banana, get dressed, brush my teeth and then I head out the door. I'm at the pool by 4:35, stretch and in the water with my team by 4:45. I don't think I could make it through such an intensive workout without a banana. I did once go to a later, on my own workout and had forgotten to eat and I crashed hard!

jgale
February 23rd, 2010, 08:44 AM
I swim at 5:30 or 6 AM depending on masters practice and/or pools schedules. I typically have coffee on the ride to the pool along with a piece of toast and PB or an energy bar. I am a big believer in having a light pre-workout snack. I don't have too many problems if I don't eat but I hate to miss my AM coffee!

aztimm
February 23rd, 2010, 02:45 PM
Herb's reply reminds me of a question that sometimes occurs to me. Even though many people swim and do exercise in early morning, I wonder if it is really good to do intensive physical exercises right after you just got up from a long night's complete rest? I mean, from the most restful 8 hours or so, to suddenly engaging the most intensive physical activities? :rolleyes:

There's an article in the march 2010 Runner's World about just that. Getting used to working out at different times, eating for it, adjusting for winter, etc. I'd strongly advise reading it.

As for me, I mostly swim in the mornings. When I take a break, it takes my body about 2 weeks to fully readjust to getting up early and working out. But if I'm not swimming early, I'm doing something else.

After reading this thread, and the book Racing Weight, I've tested myself with eating before morning workouts. For running, I get up an hour before my start, eat right away, and am ready to go when I plan. For swimming, I've been eating in my car on the way there. Depending on the set it either feels great or like I'm going to throw up. Before I tried this, I'd always be starving 30 min into a swim workout.

I always take a Gatorade type drink for workouts of around 75 min or more, especially with warm temps. I start drinking it about 40 min in; lots of water before that and even with it. Shorter than 75 min it just seems like empty calories (which I don't need) to me.

If you haven't read the Racing Weight book, I'd highly recommend it, as it covers this topic rather well.

Sharpsburger
February 25th, 2010, 04:51 PM
Herb's reply reminds me of a question that sometimes occurs to me. Even though many people swim and do exercise in early morning, I wonder if it is really good to do intensive physical exercises right after you just got up from a long night's complete rest? I mean, from the most restful 8 hours or so, to suddenly engaging the most intensive physical activities? :rolleyes:

Some very interesting recent studies have shown that there actually are "morning people" and "night owls". And our bodies are different.

Morning people have a fairly flat strength response across the day. They can hit the gym or pool first thing and they're fine.

Night owls, like me, have a strength response curve that's lowest in the morning and increases through the afternoon through evening. For me, morning exercise is difficult and painful. I imagine you're in that group, too.

knelson
February 25th, 2010, 08:39 PM
Some very interesting recent studies have shown that there actually are "morning people" and "night owls". And our bodies are different.

This reminds me of the book Le Morte d'Arthur by Thomas Malory. There's lots of talk about how such and such a knight had the power of "three men," but only in the morning or whatever. The book was published in the 1400s, so apparently we've known about morning people and night owls for a long time!

The Fortress
February 25th, 2010, 10:35 PM
Some very interesting recent studies have shown that there actually are "morning people" and "night owls". And our bodies are different.

Morning people have a fairly flat strength response across the day. They can hit the gym or pool first thing and they're fine.

Night owls, like me, have a strength response curve that's lowest in the morning and increases through the afternoon through evening. For me, morning exercise is difficult and painful. I imagine you're in that group, too.

That's why I just hate getting up early for early swim meets. :afraid::afraid: I swim just fine in the afternoon and evening. Do you have links to any of those studies?

As I recall, Racing Weight, the book Tim referred to, says that you need 100 grams of food before working out to get the max benefit from the workout. Or else you won't have enough energy. I don't seem to have much of a problem eating before I swim. If hell froze over and I was an early morning person, I'd at least eat a banana and some sport drink on the way to practice.

nhc
February 25th, 2010, 11:38 PM
I just found an article that may be one Sharpsburger was referring to:

Morning People And Night Owls Show Different Brain Function (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090623150621.htm)

I never had problem swimming late in the day (anywhere from noon to evening). Occasionally I did get up 5am to go swimming, trying to become a "morning person", but that never lasted long, and I would be back to my feel-at-home late swimming. :)

Another factor is that I can't relax so much in morning swim than evening swim. In the morning, there is a whole day's work ahead, you would just want to finish in time so as not to be late for something important. In the evening, no time pressure, swimming is a great way to end a busy day.

Perhaps the morning swimmers do not need relaxation from swimming? :rolleyes:

aztimm
February 26th, 2010, 12:06 AM
I think this may be the article I read in the magazine--

Runner's World--Get over it (http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-238-267--13440-0,00.html)

aztimm
February 26th, 2010, 12:17 AM
I never had problem swimming late in the day (anywhere from noon to evening). Occasionally I did get up 5am to go swimming, trying to become a "morning person", but that never lasted long, and I would be back to my feel-at-home late swimming. :)

Another factor is that I can't relax so much in morning swim than evening swim. In the morning, there is a whole day's work ahead, you would just want to finish in time so as not to be late for something important. In the evening, no time pressure, swimming is a great way to end a busy day.

Perhaps the morning swimmers do not need relaxation from swimming? :rolleyes:

I've swam at all different times of the day, 6am, noon, 6pm for formal workouts, and some other odd times on my own at the gym. It does take about 2 weeks of morning workouts before your body adjusts. Even now if I take a break (vacation), it takes me a couple days to adjust back.

Yes sometimes I do have morning appointments, meetings, or if nothing else, normal work. When I have an 8am (or earlier) meeting, especially if it is a distance away, I'll sometimes leave workout early. A few times I've even worked out in other parts of town (such as Scottsdale) to be closer to an early meeting. If I'm leaving early, I try to tell the coach ahead of time, and they'll usually let me know when it is time to get out. Generally, as long as I get my work done, my boss doesn't care if I start work at 6am or 10am. I may work through lunch, work some evenings, weekends, etc so it's all a wash in the end. Remote access and a work issued BlackBerry can be both a blessing and a curse.

I've been doing other workouts (weights, running, etc) after work, so I get my post-work stress relief that way. In the heat of the AZ summer, I'll flip some days and run before work, swim after. Again, it took my body some time to adjust to working out 2x a day, but after a couple of weeks I adjusted.

Sharpsburger
February 26th, 2010, 01:39 PM
I just found an article that may be one Sharpsburger was referring to:

Morning People And Night Owls Show Different Brain Function (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090623150621.htm)

I never had problem swimming late in the day (anywhere from noon to evening). Occasionally I did get up 5am to go swimming, trying to become a "morning person", but that never lasted long, and I would be back to my feel-at-home late swimming. :)

Another factor is that I can't relax so much in morning swim than evening swim. In the morning, there is a whole day's work ahead, you would just want to finish in time so as not to be late for something important. In the evening, no time pressure, swimming is a great way to end a busy day.

Perhaps the morning swimmers do not need relaxation from swimming? :rolleyes:

That's the one I would have linked to, specifically this part:


Using magnetic resonance imaging-guided brain stimulation, scientists tested muscle torque and the excitability of pathways through the spinal cord and brain. They found that morning people's brains were most excitable at 9 a.m. This slowly decreased through the day. It was the polar opposite for evening people, whose brains were most excitable at 9 p.m.
Other major findings:


Evening people became physically stronger throughout the day, but the maximum amount of force morning people could produce remained the same.



I tried working out in the morning for a while, and just couldn't. As a kid, for a time I was forced to do morning and evening swims -- the morning swims in an unheated outdoor pool, no less -- and it was extremely difficult for me, and I absolutely hated it.

If I let my body do what it wants, I'll go to bed around 1:00 a.m. and get up about 9:00 a.m. Once I'm trained to it, it's pretty easy to sleep from 9:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m., but I just cannot make my body perform in a workout during the morning.

That Guy
February 26th, 2010, 02:03 PM
That's why I just hate getting up early for early swim meets. :afraid::afraid: I swim just fine in the afternoon and evening. Do you have links to any of those studies?

As I recall, Racing Weight, the book Tim referred to, says that you need 100 grams of food before working out to get the max benefit from the workout. Or else you won't have enough energy. I don't seem to have much of a problem eating before I swim. If hell froze over and I was an early morning person, I'd at least eat a banana and some sport drink on the way to practice.

I consider myself a morning person and have no trouble working out in the morning. I eat breakfast before I work out. However, I also swim faster later in the day, it's just a fact. So for morning meets, I drink 16-24 ounces of coffee. I normally don't drink coffee so the effect is significant.:weightlifter:

swimrocket
February 26th, 2010, 02:07 PM
I wouldn't get out of bed if I didn't bribe myself with some food.

The Fortress
February 26th, 2010, 02:22 PM
If I let my body do what it wants, I'll go to bed around 1:00 a.m. and get up about 9:00 a.m.

Yep, that's my natural rhythm as well. I had a chance to test this out when school was cancelled for a 10 day period, and that was my sleep schedule. Otherwise, I'm forced to get up at 7:30, which isn't that bad. I've forbidden my kid to attend 4:45 practices, at least if I am the intended driver. My body just can't hack it. I don't think it's particularly swell for her either, as teenagers tend to stay up late naturally.

Leonard Jansen
February 26th, 2010, 02:44 PM
I am a morning person to a ridiculous degree - usually wake up at 4 AM without an alarm, absolutely bouncing off the walls to go. I can't eat, however, before my 5 am swim - It's just too upsetting to my stomach. I do drink about a quart of water on the way to the Y, though. If I have a long open water race in the AM, I've found that eating 1 or 2 PROTEIN bars (not carb/energy bars) no later than 2 hours before a race is tolerable. The protein seems to help keep the blood sugar level whereas the carb bars seem to provoke a blood sugar rush followed by a drop and consequent sluggishness.

Your mileage may vary.

-LBJ

sjstuart
February 27th, 2010, 02:55 PM
I don't know if I'm a morning person by disposition, but I definitely exercise better in the morning.

It's not that I enjoy getting up at 4:45 am, and I can definitely sleep in if I have the opportunity. But I definitely perform better in a morning workout or race. Repeat times, mental effort, everything suffers in an evening practice.

I also don't like to eat before the morning workouts. I wonder if there's a correlation? It seems so, from the handful of responses above.

nhc
February 27th, 2010, 07:31 PM
I am a morning person to a ridiculous degree - usually wake up at 4 AM without an alarm

There may be two kinds of morning people. Do you need ridiculously few hours of sleep, or do you go to bed ridiculously early? :rolleyes: (The former would be enviable :D)

Leonard Jansen
February 27th, 2010, 11:23 PM
There may be two kinds of morning people. Do you need ridiculously few hours of sleep, or do you go to bed ridiculously early? :rolleyes: (The former would be enviable :D)

I usually get 5-5.5 hours of sleep a night. (i.e. it's 11:15 PM as I type this and I'm not ready for bed yet.) I also often take a 15 minute nap at lunch. The only gotcha is that my night's sleep has to be uninterrupted and deep. I can also shut my eyes anywhere/anytime and get a few minutes sleep whenever I want. The bad part is that The Court Without Appeal is a total night person who needs lots of sleep, so I can't do things like build stuff in the basement at 4:30 AM.

-LBJ

nhc
February 28th, 2010, 09:25 AM
so I can't do things like build stuff in the basement at 4:30 AM.

So instead of building stuffs, you go swimming. :D

You live longer by sleeping less.:)

sjaeggi
March 2nd, 2010, 02:12 PM
I went 6:00 am work outs for a while and from my experience if I didnt eat anything I would completely burn out like an hour into them

RJCurwen
March 5th, 2010, 12:20 PM
Always eat. Unfortunately not enough variety. Two eggs and two pieces of toast w peanut butter plus plenty of water. I try and get it in by 5:25am, but most of the time (like this morning) last bite is 5:45am as i hurry down to the car to get to practice at 6.

I don't have issues with this at all. I eat very healthly 95% of the time. I think between the 15 minute drive and 15 - 20 minute warmup at the pool, that i have plenty of time to digest. 10 mins of drills or easing into a harder set and I can hammer by 6:30.

My guess for some of those who can't seem to eat in the morning is that it's more of a nutritional and efficiency issue, but i'm no expert and i'm guessing.

Bobinator
March 6th, 2010, 12:20 AM
I have a couple cups of coffee on my way to the pool. I still usually feel full from the night before dinner.
After swimming I have an apple in the locker room. Once I arrive at work I have a big bowl of yogurt with raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, and granola waiting for me. More coffee is good too! :coffee:

hawk43
March 6th, 2010, 08:18 AM
Thanks for the book recommendation. I ordered it today. I am at a stage in my training where I need to focus more on my body structure in order to make a significant improvement -- lean... Thanks again.

joshua
March 7th, 2010, 01:52 AM
I have alway been a morning person and as I've gotten older this is even more so. The reason is that I need less sleep. I usually fall asleep by 22:00-22:30 and wake up without a clock at 04:30-0:500. I feel fine with 6 hours sleep. I usually swim between 05:00-06:30 on an empty stomach. On the weekends (which btw is Friday and Saturday in Israel) the pool opens up later so I may have a cup of coffee and a piece of toast with a cheese spread.
After swimming I am very hungry and have a big breakfast: 2-3 eggs, 2-3 slices of whole wheat toast, tuna fish salad, vegetable salad, water, coffee.
After all this I'm ready to kick ass (I should mention that I am a high school principal) :D

Herb
March 7th, 2010, 05:34 PM
I'm guessing most of the morning people don't drink a lot of booze?

Mary R.
March 7th, 2010, 08:52 PM
I just found an article that may be one Sharpsburger was referring to:

Morning People And Night Owls Show Different Brain Function (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090623150621.htm)

I never had problem swimming late in the day (anywhere from noon to evening). Occasionally I did get up 5am to go swimming, trying to become a "morning person", but that never lasted long, and I would be back to my feel-at-home late swimming. :)

Another factor is that I can't relax so much in morning swim than evening swim. In the morning, there is a whole day's work ahead, you would just want to finish in time so as not to be late for something important. In the evening, no time pressure, swimming is a great way to end a busy day.

Perhaps the morning swimmers do not need relaxation from swimming? :rolleyes:


Well, maybe we so need the relaxation that we get our dose first thing in the morning! Yes, it's true, in the morning there is time pressure to keep moving to get to work, but the tasks and conflicts and problems of the day haven't started to colonize my brain. On the days when I swim at 6 AM swim, it's slightly rushed but a happy rushed to get to the pool. And, the clearness of thinking that swimming gives me (and actually a better ability to sort priorities among numerous demands) keeps me going all day.

Now evening swimming is difficult. First, the pressures of the day mean that there is always another demand on my time. Second, I am tense so it takes longer to warm up. Third, sometimes the swimming doesn't relax me as much as rev me up -- and so I can't get to sleep as early as I need.

It helps that I really, really enjoy watching the sun rise. By the crack of dawn in winter I am done with my laps and back home walking dogs.

And yes, I have coffee with lots of low fat milk and toast before I get to the pool.

qbrain
March 8th, 2010, 09:38 AM
I'm guessing most of the morning people don't drink a lot of booze?

There is little difference between waking up early with a hang over and waking up late with one.

RJCurwen
March 8th, 2010, 10:11 AM
I'm guessing most of the morning people don't drink a lot of booze?

zero booze.

joshua
March 9th, 2010, 09:07 AM
I'm guessing most of the morning people don't drink a lot of booze?

Correct. :chug:

aztimm
March 9th, 2010, 07:13 PM
Since I noticed this thread and since I've read most of the Racing Weight book, I've been experimenting with eating before morning swim workouts.

If I eat one of my, "100 Calorie Bar," snacks I seem to last longer in workout and even get a second wind about 3/4 way through. When I don't, I putter out about 30-45 min into a workout (my workouts are around 75 min).

Just my very unscientific observations.

qbrain
March 9th, 2010, 08:47 PM
Since I noticed this thread and since I've read most of the Racing Weight book, I've been experimenting with eating before morning swim workouts.

If I eat one of my, "100 Calorie Bar," snacks I seem to last longer in workout and even get a second wind about 3/4 way through. When I don't, I putter out about 30-45 min into a workout (my workouts are around 75 min).

Just my very unscientific observations.


Maybe someone should suggest an end of practice 50 from the blocks to your coaches, with and without breakfast, as a test? :bolt:

aztimm
March 10th, 2010, 12:43 AM
Maybe someone should suggest an end of practice 50 from the blocks to your coaches, with and without breakfast, as a test? :bolt:

Maybe all forumites should do such a test, same day, and post the results ;)

qbrain
March 10th, 2010, 10:39 AM
Maybe all forumites should do such a test, same day, and post the results ;)

Honestly, that would be SWEET.

RJCurwen
March 10th, 2010, 01:03 PM
I'll do it. But its going to be hard for me not to eat. Differenceworkouts would also be an issue, and weekly training load.

However, results may be close enough. Maybe i can even get some of my teammates to do it too.

Muppet
March 10th, 2010, 02:42 PM
This very subject, more specifically, finding the best food to eat before morning workouts, was the topic of March's Guest Article in the Terrapin Masters Newsletter

read online here: http://www.terrapinmasters.org, click on newsletter.

qbrain
March 10th, 2010, 02:45 PM
I'll do it. But its going to be hard for me not to eat. Differenceworkouts would also be an issue, and weekly training load.

However, results may be close enough. Maybe i can even get some of my teammates to do it too.

Hey John,

It was a joke. Someone already emailed aztimm's coaches and asked them to stand him up on the blocks and swim all out 50s. He is a distance person. His coaches, like all swim coaches, enjoy human discomfort, and thought it was a great idea.

I don't think the experiment would be very accurate, since the preceding workout would vary a lot between the to time trials.

RJCurwen
March 11th, 2010, 12:28 PM
Hey John,

It was a joke. Someone already emailed aztimm's coaches and asked them to stand him up on the blocks and swim all out 50s. He is a distance person. His coaches, like all swim coaches, enjoy human discomfort, and thought it was a great idea.

I don't think the experiment would be very accurate, since the preceding workout would vary a lot between the to time trials.


Thanks for clearing that up lol. Just trying to contribute.

qbrain
March 11th, 2010, 04:21 PM
Thanks for clearing that up lol. Just trying to contribute.

Sorry, I didn't mean to dissuade you from trying it.

You SHOULD try the forum 50 :)