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mpmartin
April 9th, 2010, 06:13 PM
Is it wrong to train hard, but not compete?

swim4me
April 9th, 2010, 06:19 PM
Not at all :fish2:

ElaineK
April 9th, 2010, 06:26 PM
Is it wrong to train hard, but not compete?

Do what makes YOU happy! :bliss:

tjrpatt
April 9th, 2010, 07:13 PM
I train with people who train hard but never compete and I just don't get it. If I don't compete, eventually, I won't train very hard. That will lead to not training at all. I need to have goals and train for meets so this way, I will keep the training going.

Glenn
April 9th, 2010, 07:35 PM
For those of us who love to compete, it is hard to imagine not doing so. However, there is certainly nothing at all wrong with working out hard and not competing.

I know I get much satisfaction doing a descending set well or negative splitting a 400 or predicting my time on a repeat to within a tenth of a second. These of course are mini competitions or self competitions that make a swim enjoyable and challenging for me.

Of course there is the fact that swimming hard and swimming well just feels good!

All that said, I am looking forward to my next meet.:D

stillwater
April 9th, 2010, 08:21 PM
Is it wrong to compete hard and not train?

Is it not hard to compete and train wrong?

To train and compete hard, is it not?

jessicafk11
April 9th, 2010, 08:22 PM
If you want to train hard but don't want to compete for whatever reason, there's nothing wrong with that. I like competing although I don't get to do it much. I find it helps motivate me on days when that motivation is lagging although there are days I really push it without a meet in sight! It's all about enjoying your time in the pool, do whatever floats your boat!

floswimmer
April 9th, 2010, 10:13 PM
Do what makes you HAPPY:)

david.margrave
April 9th, 2010, 11:22 PM
It's personal. If you're basically a lazy person, like me, then you won't stay fit unless you have an impending competition or some looming deadline.

Allen Stark
April 10th, 2010, 12:07 AM
I couldn't motivate myself to train hard if I didn't compete,but that's just me.Ultimately swimming is something you do for yourself,so do it your way.

Mark Savage
April 10th, 2010, 04:00 AM
I definitely fall into the category of training hard and not competing.

Rykno
April 10th, 2010, 08:59 AM
I found it difficult to train hard without having a meet to compete in. setting goals for practice is one thing, but having goal times for races is what drives me.

nkfrench
April 10th, 2010, 03:10 PM
I compete with myself and the clock. That is why I like having "benchmark sets" at practice now and then.

I don't enjoy workouts near as much if I am at a facility without paceclocks when I forget my wristwatch.

It does help me to have a future focus meet to help motivation on feeling-lazy days.

E=H2O
April 11th, 2010, 12:04 PM
I think people who can train hard and not need to compete are gifted. Unfortunately I am afflicted with the "must compete or I'll sleep in and have ice cream for breakfast" group. However, while I do most of my swim training in a pool, I only race in open water.

tjrpatt
April 11th, 2010, 01:05 PM
I think people who can train hard and not need to compete are gifted.

That takes discipline to just train and train without anything to shoot for.

osterber
April 11th, 2010, 01:07 PM
I prefer to train hard, and then run meets. :-)

-Rick

nkfrench
April 11th, 2010, 01:47 PM
If I were gifted, I would enjoy going to swim meets more.
Finishing DFL or otherwise finishing slower than people who do much less training lacks appeal.

mpmartin
April 11th, 2010, 01:56 PM
Nancy,

I have to say that's the position I find myself in currently. I think that's why I am questioning whether to compete or not.

Herb
April 11th, 2010, 04:47 PM
I definately compete so I have goals to keep me working hard.

Ironically, most all of my measurable improvement is from workouts and not races. I have dropped my repeat times per hundred about 10 seconds with 30 seconds less rest - yet my 100 race time has only improved 1 second. I hope this improvement will at least manifest when I switch back to distance races this summer!

I don't care that much but I admit it is also a little humbling getting my butt kicked in meets. People at the Y call me Michael Phelps, but I have to explain to them how in reality I really suck.

nkfrench
April 11th, 2010, 05:19 PM
People at the Y call me Michael Phelps, but I have to explain to them how in reality I really suck.

Yeah, I get some of that non-reality-based feedback too. Good grief!

But if I tell people that my swimming is just awful, that translates to them that they REALLY suck, a put-down for them. Most of the population can't even swim at all, so their even more humble abilities may still be something they are proud of (deservedly so). It could be convincing somebody who could enjoy swimming with a Masters group that they aren't good enough.

So it's best to just smile and just tell them they are being nice/generous; and that you've been doing this for a long time, etc.

swim4me
April 11th, 2010, 06:10 PM
I love to be in the water. I like the feel of it. I like how I feel as I swim. I sometimes compete, but I don't have to. I swim because I enjoy swimming. :fish2:

aztimm
April 11th, 2010, 08:10 PM
I fall into the train and non-compete category, like the majority (around 70-80%) of registered USMS members.

On my team, we have ample opportunity to do timed swims, before/during/after workouts, and I'll do those on a regular basis, and those are more than enough to satisfy any competition bug I may get. I used to do 2-3 meets a year, and did the USMS national meet when it was local, but I just saw little reason to compete when I'm not even close to NQT's.

The primary reason I workout is for general health and fitness. The results I see in the mirror and hear from others (especially my doctor) are far more important than how fast I can or can't swim. I swim with USMS teams 99% of the time, and if I don't show for workout, I'll usually get a comment from the coach or a fellow swimmer when I miss. Once I'm there, I'll do whatever the coach says to do. The coaches do a fantastic job motivating me--and everyone else--by recording times, keeping team records, etc.

E=H2O
April 11th, 2010, 08:38 PM
I fall into the train and non-compete category, like the majority (around 70-80%) of registered USMS members.

On my team, we have ample opportunity to do timed swims, before/during/after workouts, and I'll do those on a regular basis, and those are more than enough to satisfy any competition bug I may get. I used to do 2-3 meets a year, and did the USMS national meet when it was local, but I just saw little reason to compete when I'm not even close to NQT's.

The primary reason I workout is for general health and fitness. The results I see in the mirror and hear from others (especially my doctor) are far more important than how fast I can or can't swim. I swim with USMS teams 99% of the time, and if I don't show for workout, I'll usually get a comment from the coach or a fellow swimmer when I miss. Once I'm there, I'll do whatever the coach says to do. The coaches do a fantastic job motivating me--and everyone else--by recording times, keeping team records, etc.

I don't compete in pools anymore. I like OW races because it is about the race not the time. And in every OW rce there are always races within a race. For example in a 5K last year a group broke from the front so fast I never had a shot, but half way into the race a group of us had come together and we raced stroke for stroke, each of us trying to break away. It came down to the lake 400 meters. Lots of fun.

Jazz Hands
April 12th, 2010, 09:12 AM
I train with people who train hard but never compete and I just don't get it. If I don't compete, eventually, I won't train very hard. That will lead to not training at all. I need to have goals and train for meets so this way, I will keep the training going.

I think it depends, as Jeeves would say, on the psychology of the individual. Some get more gratification out of the daily workouts per se, and others want a long term structure to training with a big meet at the end of it.

__steve__
April 12th, 2010, 09:30 AM
I compete every chance I get but I don't practice too hard. This is my first season swimming, been to 3 meets, but I have only attended 2 coached practices. This is partially due to my work schedule, but another reason is my practice swimming is very laid back and enjoyable, maybe only 2 - 3 minutes of suffering throughout.

Even if I'm slow and come close to last place, as long as my times still improve I will keep the same method. At some point I will hit a wall, then I might have to change things.

orca1946
April 12th, 2010, 01:12 PM
My wife calls it working out.