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Surfsalterpath
April 9th, 2010, 10:30 PM
Alright, USA Swimming.

Yes, you should apologize. Step up the protection of
our youth and ban these idiots who think they can
get their jollies out on the youth of America.


Do not become like the catholic church and try to sweep
this BS under the rug. Take charge and accept the problems
and DEAL WITH IT!

Lump
April 9th, 2010, 11:29 PM
Black eye for sure.:badday:

http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/abc-news-investigation-usa-swimming-coaches-raped-molested/story?id=10322469

Jason Marsteller
April 9th, 2010, 11:54 PM
http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/lane9/news/23965.asp

They already do ban coaches that do this stuff. The link above is my article after a conversation with Chuck Wielgus. This occurred prior to the 20/20 video, which is trying to make a parallel to the Catholic Church that just doesn't exist.

Surfsalterpath
April 10th, 2010, 12:09 AM
...

...i am not a coach.

The interview w/ 20/20 was embarrassing for swimming.
Sounded just like the church. USA Swimming
should accept responsibility for the problems they have
skirted by their watch and clamp down on any future issues
that arise. With an intense firm hand.

I have encouraged many in our community to swim and
have fun doing it. For this leader to dodge the issue
is unacceptable. Stand up, be a real man and accept
the work that needs to be done in the future to rid
the organization of the perverts and make USA Swimming
better for the problems that have been hidden.


What is so hard about that? Apologize dude and tell your
membership you will do better!

Ahelee Sue Osborn
April 10th, 2010, 01:01 AM
I find it amazing that this is the first post on our discussion forum about this issue.

Is everyone just so blown away by this that they can't comment or discuss some solutions?

USA Swimming began a crackdown on this problem a few years ago. Ask any swim coach - we all know about the screening process. It is obviously a process and one that the swim club organizations have to take responsibility for as well.

What really has to happen, is reporting.
By swimmers, parents, co-coaches and any other observer of behavior that is even subtly off.
No athlete should feel as though they can not report abuse - ever again.

Parents and coaches have to continue to talk and explain to the kids so they understand there is help if anything is wrong.

On the flip side, those swimmers who have never experienced abuse by a
swim coach need to begin a strong voice for the good and the great aspects of our sport.

The public needs to hear the good stories about swimming now more than ever.

Karen Duggan
April 10th, 2010, 01:36 AM
I am so disgusted and disappointed, and I see Chuck Wielgus as a complete idiot. You are damn right you should apologize! You represent the rest of us (former) and current coaches, parents, and swimmers; and what has been happening for at least 30 years is far beyond "tragic".

I learned to swim in 1979 and in 1980 made my first Far Westerns. One of my teammates was 8 (I was 10). At our hotel we couldn't figure out why she was so upset that she couldn't sleep in our room. Our coach said she was just tired. Yea, right. Turns out he was not only molesting her, but he married her mother (the asst. coach) to have 24/7 access to the 8 yo. Bastard. He ended up going to jail for a long time.

This is a far bigger problem than 36 coaches. Those are just the ones that have been caught. USA Swimming better get busy and clean house or I suspect much bigger repercussions than the black eye our sport just took.

I too wonder how a lot of these parents "let" this happen. My mom was always around for travel meets and also watching my teammates when their parents couldn't go. Are there really parents out there who knew this kind of thing was happening and did nothing? I'm sure there are. That's a whole other ball of wax.

I am just so stunned by that whole story. Not surprised that it was happening, but at the pathetic way that it was handled by USA-S. I know, how about being proactive and trying not to turn the uncomfortable questions back on the reporter. Why not apologize and say, "You know what, we've really screwed up here. We need to take a very close look at the people who have access to our young athletes." Nah, that would have required some common sense.

Good night. Thanks for the upset stomach before bed, Chuck.

elise526
April 10th, 2010, 01:37 AM
This really is a problematic area. Swim coaches are almost like parents to kids. When a parent sexually abuses a child, what is the likelihood of that child coming forward while it is going on? Unfortunately, not very likely. Same situation with a trusted adult and a kid.

Former teams probably are concerned about getting sued if they say anything negative about a former coach if called during a hiring inquiry. Many teams are uninformed about the true nature of a new coach. Also, some coaches probably land a job while still coaching at another team and the former team is never contacted.

The only thing I can think of is for USA Swimming to provide an anonymous whistleblower hotline (in addition to the current system in place that requires a written report be e-mailed to Chuck W.) where swimmers or parents can lodge a complaint against a particular coach and then USA swimming can have the particular team's safety coordinator or other team rep investigate or follow-up. The name of the person making a complaint would not be given by the person making the complaint and he/she should be instructed at the beginning of the conversation when the complaint is made not to give his/her name. I'm sure that false reports would come in, but I suppose this would be better than not having anything in place at all. If such a thing is put in place, swimmers (of all ages) and parents need to be aware of such a hotline.

Another thing that could be put in place would be an anonymous follow-up questionaire anwered by parents from a former team. In other words, if a coach were to switch teams, his/her USA coaching certification would automatically expire upon leaving a team until USA Swimming could verify by anonymous questionaires answered by parents on the former team that children are safe with this coach. This is a somewhat drastic measure and would present numerous problems. How many parents would need to answer the questionaire? What about teams that needed a coach on deck immediately?

It is too bad that a few bad apples have given our sport a bad name. So many good coaches out there have made such a positive difference for kids. I know my coaches sure made a positive difference in my life. At the same time, sexual abuse affects kids for the rest of their life, so we need to do everything we can to protect them from it.

Edit: I think one good thing about the 20/20 report is that it has made parents more aware of the need to be vigilant about the adults working with their children. Also, parents really need to think about how well they know their own kids, how much they communicate with their own kids, and how much positive support they give their own kids. Sometimes a child who is not getting enough support at home will turn to a "trusted" adult who ends up abusing the child. Abusers seem to have a knack at honing in on children who are emotionally neglected at home.

makesense
April 10th, 2010, 06:02 AM
despicable, a cloud over everyone

swimshark
April 10th, 2010, 06:42 AM
What about other sports? Does anyone think this is just confined to swimming? I doubt it.

A few years ago a swimmer got mad at one of my coaches (I swim with an age group team) because he he was going to tell her parents something. So she told her parents that he touched her and she left the team. Truth was she was cutting her self and the coach said to tell her parents. How sick is that? So it can go both ways.

Muppet
April 10th, 2010, 09:17 AM
What really has to happen, is reporting.
By swimmers, parents, co-coaches and any other observer of behavior that is even subtly off.
No athlete should feel as though they can not report abuse - ever again.

Parents and coaches have to continue to talk and explain to the kids so they understand there is help if anything is wrong.

On the flip side, those swimmers who have never experienced abuse by a
swim coach need to begin a strong voice for the good and the great aspects of our sport.

Great Post Ahelee. Parents aren't parenting anymore. Where was the "don't ever let anyone touch you there" talk? Not trying to remove blame from the coaches that did this, but especially today's parents are really letting down their kids by being their friend and not their parent.


A few years ago a swimmer got mad at one of my coaches (I swim with an age group team) because he he was going to tell her parents something. So she told her parents that he touched her and she left the team. Truth was she was cutting her self and the coach said to tell her parents. How sick is that? So it can go both ways.

This is exactly what I am worried about, especially since I coach teenagers. I believe I have been raised right and trained appropriately to avoid situations as described in the 20/20 piece. However, there's a line in the USA Swimming Code of Conduct that basically says when it comes to crimes of a sexual nature, you're guilty until proven innocent. It's a bit disconcerting.

DPC
April 10th, 2010, 10:41 AM
What about other sports? Does anyone think this is just confined to swimming? I doubt it.



There has been an ongoing issue with youth hockey as well. The saddest part is that for some of these kids the coach is closer to them than the parents, and the weirdos take advantage of that. The other sad part is that some times the kids that do say something, the claim is dismissed by the adults. Then you have the times where the kids or parents claim abuse by the coach out of spite or revenge.

In any case this bozo at USA Swimming should find his way to the exit door and fast.

nkfrench
April 10th, 2010, 03:39 PM
USA Swimming doesn't hire coaches - the club teams do. Usually a volunteer board of directors will hire the head coach; then the head coach will hire the assistants.

New assistant coaches are often ex-swimmers from the same team they hire on to, or who swam with another coach on the team in college, etc. They showed no signs of being untrustworthy during those years. I've seen a case where a coach was caught and it was a total surprise.

USAS has had mandatory background screening in place for years for coaches; but that will only find individuals who have been caught. There is a "first time" for any offender. So even the best screening measures aren't going to be fool-proof.

Karen Duggan
April 10th, 2010, 03:41 PM
Excellent post Elise. Great idea with the whistleblower idea. Coaches should not be allowed on deck until they have been investigated.

I'm sorry, but a coach who has been with NUMEROUS teams should raise some suspicion.

You will always get wackos in our society who will be mad at a coach and may falsely accuse them, but hopefully, that would all come out in an investigation.

The main idea here is that it does happen and there is NOTHING to prevent it in the first place. Although USA-S does check for criminal convictions, big whoop. There needs to be a thorough overhaul of this screening process.

And to whoever asked (somewhere, maybe on FB) why this is coming out now, b/c it is still happening now. A local mom (to us) reported a coach and NOTHING was done. So she was smart and went to 20/20. Now that useless weasel Wielgus will have to do something- I suggest RESIGN !

gobears
April 10th, 2010, 05:06 PM
Interesting how the culture toward this stuff has changed over the years. I remember rumors circulating about Mitch Ivey when I was in high-school (early 80's). People seemed to kind of shrug that stuff off back then. I'm glad that attitudes towards coaches "dating" their young swimmers have (rightly) changed and are now viewed as predatory behavior.

Karen Duggan
April 10th, 2010, 05:41 PM
I swam with Mitch as did my husband. He was not a predator. I am not comfortable discussing his private life, but I can say that he was not a predator.

gobears
April 10th, 2010, 06:25 PM
I swam with Mitch as did my husband. He was not a predator. I am not comfortable discussing his private life, but I can say that he was not a predator.

I can't claim any special knowledge about Ivey. I'm just glad the attitude towards this kind of thing has changed.

mindy
April 10th, 2010, 08:15 PM
This type of behavior was going on when I swam in the late 60's, and early 70's. It was a good old boy network that protected itself. Well that is over. I agree with just about everyone. Clubs need to take responsibility for who they hire. Parents, and swimmers need to report. The screening is useless, if the offender has never been reported. Parents need to be aware, and swimmers need to take responsibility, and talk. I always felt this was much more prevalent in the college ranks. Heck, how many college coaches have married their swimmers? I do however think that the idiot usa rep on 20/20 should be gone. He came off as smug and arrogant. Not exactly the image we want right now. This is the greatest sport, and good riddance to those that tarnished it.

Lump
April 10th, 2010, 09:03 PM
USA Swimming doesn't hire coaches - the club teams do. Usually a volunteer board of directors will hire the head coach; then the head coach will hire the assistants.

New assistant coaches are often ex-swimmers from the same team they hire on to, or who swam with another coach on the team in college, etc. They showed no signs of being untrustworthy during those years. I've seen a case where a coach was caught and it was a total surprise.

USAS has had mandatory background screening in place for years for coaches; but that will only find individuals who have been caught. There is a "first time" for any offender. So even the best screening measures aren't going to be fool-proof.

That was kind of my thought. However the report did make Wielgus look like a complete tool representing US Swimming.

elise526
April 10th, 2010, 10:38 PM
USA Swimming doesn't hire coaches - the club teams do. Usually a volunteer board of directors will hire the head coach; then the head coach will hire the assistants.

New assistant coaches are often ex-swimmers from the same team they hire on to, or who swam with another coach on the team in college, etc. They showed no signs of being untrustworthy during those years. I've seen a case where a coach was caught and it was a total surprise.

USAS has had mandatory background screening in place for years for coaches; but that will only find individuals who have been caught. There is a "first time" for any offender. So even the best screening measures aren't going to be fool-proof.

True enough, but don't you think that any organization responsible for certifying or basically licensing individuals is more respected by the public when it is self-regulated and has effective measures in place to do so?

I tend to agree that the team and the coach committing the abuse are ultimately responsible for the damage a child suffers at the hands of an abusive coach rather than USA swimming. I do think, however, now that USA Swimming is under the microscope, it will appear to be better acting in the interest of kids if it makes it easier to report inappropriate behavior vis a vis a hotline.

I'm not familiar with every iota of insurance coverage provided to swim clubs, but I hope it covers negligent hiring. These types of lawsuits are sure to multiply down the road as more swimmers come forward.

chaos
April 10th, 2010, 10:55 PM
lets see, there are 50k USMS members and what.... like half a million (?) usas swimmers? there are bound to be a few bad apples.... get rid of them. i don't believe the problem is systemic or that (like the catholic church) usa swimming actually created an atmosphere where such behavior is tolerated or overlooked.

now, on the other hand... is there a sport/activity more sexually suggestive than butterfly? (me thinks not) ..... well maybe brazilian jiu jitsu.......

That Guy
April 10th, 2010, 11:07 PM
lambada

Bobinator
April 10th, 2010, 11:11 PM
The school system where I teach requires anyone who works with students (including parent volunteers) to undergo a criminal history check through the state police department. I think this costs $15.00-$25.00 per year.
This rule was established due to 3 different lay coaches who were employed by the high school. These coaches were found abusing high school students. One of them ended up marrying his victim when she turned 18 and he got out of prison. One of the other two committed suicide before prosecution. The 3rd is still in prison. I'm not sure how the multiple victims are doing.
None of these were swim coaches! (boys soccer, girls basketball, and softball)

The criminal history check system seems to be working pretty well.
Lately there have been reports of students sexually abusing students. This is currently being investigated in our district by the police department. It appears to be a form of hazing involving seniors abusing the freshmen on a certain team. (again, not swimming)

smontanaro
April 11th, 2010, 12:19 PM
However the report did make Wielgus look like a complete tool representing US Swimming.

That was, more-or-less, 20/20's intent I suspect. The written interview with Swimming World magazine put him in a bit different light. I doubt Wielgus was hired for his interview skills. It should be apparent he was going to look bad.

Skip

Peter Cruise
April 11th, 2010, 01:14 PM
Speaking as a former police officer who dealt with a few pedophiles, I feel I must emphasize how sophisticated and clever many of them are in pursuit of their perversions. They are usually adept liars, often feel no remorse (in fact often feel they are benefiting their victims), commonly network with other pedophiles (helping screen each other). Many times there is no criminal record to check (although, of course, that sort of due diligence should be done), so as others have posted, much needs to be done in educating parents & club officials in recognizing signs & symptoms of abuse plus zeal exercised in checking out 'get out of town' job references that can be found in some abusers' resumes.

chaos
April 11th, 2010, 02:16 PM
Speaking as a former police officer who dealt with a few pedophiles, I feel I must emphasize how sophisticated and clever many of them are in pursuit of their perversions.


as a former PO, do you not find it odd that this coach's perversion (video taping teen age girls in the shower... as mentioned in the link) earned him 33 years in federal prison while most people convicted of violent sex crimes receive much lighter sentences?

Karen Duggan
April 11th, 2010, 02:49 PM
My hubby, a current police officer, made the comment, "Why are people looking for USA-S to police this, the police police this." Underneath it all, that is really what it comes down to. Notice there was no mention of anyone saying that they had gone to the police. The one mom who called 20/20 seemed like she was putting all of her hope that USA-S would take care of it. How can they, besides to fire the coach. These people need to be ARRESTED.

I agree with my hubby, but also think that USA-S should really clean house as I mentioned, and like Elise, get a real screening in place.

My hubby also said that with the Internet anybody can look up anything on anyone. For example, one of the idiots he arrested recently won't be prosecuted but an arrest will show up when you google his name.

I suggest a webpage on USA-S where people can blog about coaches.

If nothing else. I hope parent communicate to their children the importance of reporting inappropriate behavior by adults.

pwolf66
April 11th, 2010, 03:24 PM
I suggest a webpage on USA-S where people can blog about coaches.

While on the surface this can sound like such a good idea, it is a terrifying one in reality.

How does one adjudicate the accuracy of statements concerning coaches? Once a damaging accusation appears how does the target defend themselves in the court of public opinion.

It's already a 'guilty and it doesn't matter your innocence' attitude currently within the USA swimming community.

Bobinator
April 11th, 2010, 03:46 PM
as a former PO, do you not find it odd that this coach's perversion (video taping teen age girls in the shower... as mentioned in the link) earned him 33 years in federal prison while most people convicted of violent sex crimes receive much lighter sentences?

I knew this guy. He was also a public school teacher for awhile.
I think he was nailed because they were able to obtain actual footage of children he had taped on his computer. He sold the computer to a woman per e-bay but for some reason did not have all this stuff wiped off his hard drive. When she came upon it she turned him in complete with all the evidence.

chaos
April 11th, 2010, 03:55 PM
I knew this guy. He was also a public school teacher for awhile.
I think he was nailed because they were able to obtain actual footage of children he had taped on his computer. He sold the computer to a woman per e-bay but for some reason did not have all this stuff wiped off his hard drive. When she came upon it she turned him in complete with all the evidence.

yes, what this guy did was criminal and sleazy to say the least, but doesn't 33 years in federal prison seems a bit heavy..... or is it just me?

chaos
April 11th, 2010, 03:59 PM
I agree with my hubby, but also think that USA-S should really clean house as I mentioned, and like Elise, get a real screening in place.


there are lots of small swim clubs out there with volunteer coaches. the certifications required now are already enough of a burden to deter lots of would be coaches and asst. coaches.

Karen Duggan
April 11th, 2010, 05:14 PM
chaos- my club was small and my friend was still molested- in this case size does not matter

Paul- I think the opposite could work as well. I would defend some coaches to the end in a public forum. Just imagine if even one sleazy swim coach thought they would be caught b/c of a webpage like that? Maybe they would go away.

What it really comes down to is an effective screening process.

Karen Duggan
April 11th, 2010, 05:16 PM
yes, what this guy did was criminal and sleazy to say the least, but doesn't 33 years in federal prison seems a bit heavy..... or is it just me?

Yep. I suspect that there was a lot more to this than we are privy to. Serial killers serve less time than that or get out in 3-5 for "good behavior". Blech.

Ahelee Sue Osborn
April 11th, 2010, 05:18 PM
In case you are not a registered USA Swim Coach...
Thought you might be interested to read this message from Chuck Wielgus.



TO: All USA Swimming Member Coaches
FROM: Chuck Wielgus, Executive Director
DATE: April 11, 2010
SUBJECT: Child Protection Safeguards

In recent days our sport has been portrayed in a very bad light in the media. Sadly, I have also been portrayed as an insensitive, uncaring administrator and spokesperson for USA Swimming. There are pieces of the recent 20/20 interview that I’d like to have back, there were important things left out, and there were pieces of the report that were untrue.

As a father myself, it breaks my heart to know that there are children out there who have been taken advantage of by their coaches or others in positions of trust. It reminded me to sit down with my daughters and have a very frank but very important discussion about boundaries and appropriate behavior.

I also am extremely sorry if our organization has not done enough to provide the highest level of child protection safeguards and guidelines. We cannot shy away from this issue and we are going to need your help and participation. I want to encourage you to be proactive in addressing this topic with the young athletes, parents and other coaches with whom you work.

As a starting point, here are some very important factors to consider:

Ř This is a societal issue. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that by the age of 18, one in four girls and one in six boys have been sexually molested. This amounts to approximately 39M victims in the U.S. alone.

Ř Parents have the most important role. Parents need to talk with their children about what is acceptable and what is not acceptable physical contact between the child and their coach and other adults. Parents must also stress to their children the importance of telling them anytime there is inappropriate or questionable behavior by their coach or other adults.

Ř Sexual abuse must be reported to the police. It is estimated that 30% of sexual abuse incidents go unreported. Children and parents need to understand that it is not only okay to report these incidents, but that reporting is the only way that sexual predators can be brought to justice and prevented from harming others.

Ř Child protection safeguards are both national and local. USA Swimming provides a number of safeguards, but the most important application of safeguards must take place at the club level.

USA Swimming’s current child protection safeguards are:
o Safety Training – all member coaches must be certified in CPR, First Aid and Safety Training for Swim Coaches.

o Background Screening – all member coaches must clear (prior to joining and then every two years) a criminal history screening that checks for charges involving sexual misconduct and illegal drug use, among other things.

o Education – by the second year of membership a coach must complete the “Foundations of Coaching” course.

o Code of Conduct – our rulebook outlines a thorough Code of Conduct that is applied to all members.

o Reporting of Complaints – our rulebook also details the procedures for reporting any Code of Conduct violations. Complaints involving sexual misconduct should be sent directly to my attention at USA Swimming HQ: cwielgus@usaswimming.org. (It is worth noting that anyone can file a complaint against a member … non-members may file complaints).

In addition to these safeguards, we are continually studying what other youth- serving organizations are doing to determine if there are other safeguards that could enhance our child protection efforts. Two items that are under immediate consideration are:

o Hot Line – we are currently working to establish an anonymous reporting hotline so that victims who may be frightened can report any sexual abuse and have this information relayed to police.

o Black List – we are studying the feasibility of making available a list of names of individuals who have been banned for life from USA Swimming for sexual misconduct, in order to provide a resource for other youth-focused organizations.

Member clubs, as independent businesses, must also employ responsible hiring practices. At a minimum we recommend the following:

o Raise Awareness – by openly talking about the topic of sexual misconduct you will help young athletes, parents and coaches all become more comfortable with recognizing what is inappropriate behavior.

o Conduct Thorough Reference Checks – club leaders must take the time to thoroughly check the personal and professional background and previous experiences of coaches before they are hired. Do not simply rely on USA Swimming’s criminal background screening; checking driving records and other police records are also important. Clubs should not only check references from prior employers, but should seek input from other parents whose children previously swam for the coach.

o Stress the Importance of Reporting – Sexual abuse is a criminal act and must be reported to the police. Reporting to USA Swimming is also important because we can then take action to expel the offending adult from our organization, and hopefully keep them from becoming involved with any other youth organization.

I hope this information is helpful to you as you address this very important issue with the young athletes, coaches and parents with whom you work.

Thank you very much for giving this your most serious consideration and attention.

Karen Duggan
April 11th, 2010, 05:40 PM
Should have sent that to 20/20 before they made an omelette on his face.

Lump
April 11th, 2010, 06:08 PM
That was, more-or-less, 20/20's intent I suspect. The written interview with Swimming World magazine put him in a bit different light. I doubt Wielgus was hired for his interview skills. It should be apparent he was going to look bad.

Skip

It was apparent and 20/20 did what they set out to do....that is all. I don't know a thing about the guy, but he looked like an ass, which was 20/20's intention. Not sure why he would agree to an interview where you KNOW you are gonna get ambushed.

Peter Cruise
April 11th, 2010, 06:58 PM
David- I've pretty well given up trying to make sense of relative sentences between courts in different levels and jurisdictions. As someone said, there was probably more to the story. Perhaps as well, the prosecution was lucky enough to get a judge who had a firm grip on reality...

Bobinator
April 11th, 2010, 07:10 PM
Yeah, I don't know what a "normal" prison sentence is for something like that but I will say no one around here was complaining or trying to go-to-bat for him.

JimRude
April 11th, 2010, 07:33 PM
Wielgus might have looked much better on 20/20 if he hadn't been so defensive. How hard would it have been to say something like:

"Any abuse of children swimming for USAS registered clubs will be dealt with immediately by the club and by USAS cooperating with law enforcement to ensure that perpetrators are prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Effective immediately we will begin assisting clubs with implementing the most thorough background checks possible. To the extent we failed to do so in the past, I apologize on behalf of USAS. That is all".

I don't know Wielgus from Moses, but he sounded bad, and the letter saying "parents are responsible" is BS. As a swimmer parent, I entrust the club - and its coaches - with my kids when they are at practice. So the coaches, the board, etc - and USAS - bear some responsibility. It's not like the kids were smoking dope in the locker room, or behind the 7-11 before workout (like we did...). That you cannot hold the club responsible for.

david.margrave
April 11th, 2010, 07:56 PM
My hubby, a current police officer, made the comment, "Why are people looking for USA-S to police this, the police police this."

First, my sympathies to the victims and their families.

I wasn't going to jump into this, because I don't want to badmouth USA swimming because of the actions of a few, or make remarks that could be interpreted as insensitive towards the victims or families, but these are my thoughts as well. The police are the first place these people should have gone in my opinion, not to USA swimming. I read one story that USA swimming dismissed a complaint because the victim 'could not get another coach to corroborate it'. I think it is regrettable that that particular family did not go to the police.

I also think that Wielgus put his foot in his mouth about whether he owes an apology, but I think the point he was trying to make was that HE was not the perpetrator of any of these acts. Also I suspect that lawyers have advised the leadership of USA swimming not to make apologies because of how that could influence the inevitable litigation.

DPC
April 11th, 2010, 08:40 PM
The criminal history check system seems to be working pretty well.

We do the same in my district - its a state requirement in fact. We had a former hs teacher, back in the 80's, that was pursuing a female student and ended up being fired and he lost his teaching license. He later applied as a bus driver for the company taht provides bus service to the district and we were able to cull him via the criminal offender information check. We had another more recent where the kids using their cell phones taped his "innocent" advances on this one student - the girl actually defended his fawning over her - and he was bounced as well. maybe the kids and their ease with technology help shine the light on these creeps.

Karen Duggan
April 11th, 2010, 11:15 PM
Believe me technology is catching quite a few of these less than human beings. Preying on-line and texting can also make the predator the prey. Love it.

swimshark
April 12th, 2010, 07:40 AM
The police are the first place these people should have gone in my opinion, not to USA swimming. I read one story that USA swimming dismissed a complaint because the victim 'could not get another coach to corroborate it'. I think it is regrettable that that particular family did not go to the police.


I agree. This is a criminal issue that the police should deal with, not an organization. Once the police start to investigate, then USA-S should get involved and suspend the coach until the investigation is complete. I am a former director of a Victim Assistance Program and married to a former police officer.

smontanaro
April 12th, 2010, 09:06 AM
Not sure why he would agree to an interview where you KNOW you are gonna get ambushed.

I totally agree. In this day and age of "sound bite journalism" I can't imagine any organization putting themselves in that sort of position, at least not without a ton of preparation.

S

smontanaro
April 12th, 2010, 09:10 AM
Wielgus might have looked much better on 20/20 if he hadn't been so defensive. How hard would it have been to say something like: ...

He might well have. If he did it's clear it wound up on the cutting room floor.

Skip

makesense
April 12th, 2010, 11:55 AM
boil the guilty, be careful about the wrongly accused....for ethical reasons as well as legal ones

we need all real complaints, but we need to be careful with false, vindictive, scapegoating complaints...where does the wrongly accused get his/her reputation back

however, if guilty then boil

knelson
April 12th, 2010, 12:08 PM
Once a damaging accusation appears how does the target defend themselves in the court of public opinion.

I'm with you, Paul. I doubt there's a coach in the world who is universally adored. There are plenty of swimmers and parents with an axe to grind because of some perceived slight or personality clash with their coach.

Ahelee Sue Osborn
April 12th, 2010, 12:13 PM
we need all real complaints, but we need to be careful with false, vindictive, scapegoating complaints...where does the wrongly accused get his/her reputation back



This IS the flip side of this horrible problem. Both are equally life changing in the worst way.

It is incredible how smooth and convincing a great liar can be....

Coaches need to be on the watch for these personalities.
Stay far away - and NEVER be alone with them.

orca1946
April 12th, 2010, 01:17 PM
As a coach of 23 seasons, there are problems on both sides of this issue ! Some kids make stuff up & some coaches [all sports] that are sickos !

stillwater
April 12th, 2010, 01:45 PM
Children lie. Adults do too.

The ramifications of the lying are at issue here. Most children's lies can be found out. Yes, very serious damage is done to the adult, however, most of the time the children can't keep the lie up. Children are a protected class.

I'll bet that the number of children lying about abuse is far, far less than the number of abused children.

I thought that Welgas' written response was pretty good.

If you want to coach kids, part of the game is to understand the rules.

Ahelee Sue Osborn
April 12th, 2010, 02:06 PM
The ramifications of the lying are at issue here. Most children's lies can be found out. Yes, very serious damage is done to the adult, however, most of the time the children can't keep the lie up. Children are a protected class.
I'll bet that the number of children lying about abuse is far, far less than the number of abused children.

I hate to say it, but teenagers are pretty different now than in the 70s.
Not to say we didn't do some pretty bad stuff back then :)

I think the message is that good and well meaning coaches need to be very careful and protective of their own good reputation.

I believe if a young swimmer had to report directly to a policeman, it would sway them from lying for long.
The police are professionals. It seems that they would be able to recognize the truthful story vs. a fabrication easier than we might.

swimmj
April 12th, 2010, 03:15 PM
I hate to say it, but teenagers are pretty different now than in the 70s.
Not to say we didn't do some pretty bad stuff back then :)

I think the message is that good and well meaning coaches need to be very careful and protective of their own good reputation.

I believe if a young swimmer had to report directly to a policeman, it would sway them from lying for long.
The police are professionals. It seems that they would be able to recognize the truthful story vs. a fabrication easier than we might.

Agreed. And as coaches we need to watch for any behavior in other coaches we think might be predatory. And use common sense when dealing with kids - don't put yourself in a position to be accused, by not being alone with a single swimmer.

--mj

Karen Duggan
April 12th, 2010, 03:44 PM
As a parent, teacher, and being married to a cop, I can honestly say that children are horrible liars when they have to keep it up. It is the pathological liars (that have huge other issues in their life) that innocent people need to be leary of.

Unfortunately, sometimes too much damage is done to someone innocent before the truth comes out.

elise526
April 12th, 2010, 05:26 PM
When I was a USA Coach, I was also an employee of the YMCA. Our Y had us attend a one hour seminar held at the Y every year that specifically adressed the issue of child abuse. There were certain guidelines in place that we were to follow to avoid a false allegation of sexual abuse. The ones I could remember were as follows:

1. A coach is not to give an athlete a ride home.

2. If a parent is late to pick up a child, two coaches are to remain until the parent or other responsible guardian listed on an appoved pick-up list arrives.

3. A coach is not to travel alone to a meet with an athlete.

4. When talking to an athlete, have another coach present.

5. Communicate through the parent as much as possible.

Anyway, I hope now that this issue has really gotten a ton of attention, clubs will be sure that they have very specific guidelines in place to protect coaches. The bottom line was to avoid being alone with an athlete.

Brian Stack
April 12th, 2010, 05:50 PM
Here's a link to an article that ran last week in the East Bay Express, a free weekly distributed in Berkeley, Oakland and the rest of the east side of the SF Bay detailing a recent local incident:
http://www.eastbayexpress.com/gyrobase/swimming-in-sex-abuse/Content?oid=1678180&storyPage=1

Karen Duggan
April 13th, 2010, 03:51 PM
Brian-
That is so disgusting. I take solace in knowing that rapists and child molesters are not well received in jail. He'll get his. IMHO, that article had WAY too much detail. I didn't need to know all that.

I feel so sorry for the family of this coach. How devastating.

knelson
April 13th, 2010, 04:49 PM
Parts of the article are pretty cringe inducing alright. And Andrew King sounds even worse than Stovall.

Despite the gravity of the story I did have to chuckle a little at this:

Around May of 2009, according to Firestone, the team received a letter from Contra Costa College saying that it hadn't received pool rent for a year and a half and that Bear Swimming owed it $28,000....Stovall offered no explanation ....But he kept his position as head coach of a nearby Berkeley team, Strawberry Canyon Aquatic Masters.

Sort of ironic he was coaching a team called SCAM! No offense to any current swimmers or coaches of that team.

no200fly
April 13th, 2010, 05:05 PM
I am so disgusted and disappointed, and I see Chuck Wielgus as a complete idiot. You are damn right you should apologize! You represent the rest of us (former) and current coaches, parents, and swimmers; and what has been happening for at least 30 years is far beyond "tragic".

Why not apologize and say, "You know what, we've really screwed up here. We need to take a very close look at the people who have access to our young athletes." Nah, that would have required some common sense.

Good night. Thanks for the upset stomach before bed, Chuck.

I guess I was not aware that there was a widespread problem with USA swim coaches molesting children. I swam as a child and never heard of any complaints, but by the same token, I don't remember complaints about scout masters, teachers and priests. I think that as long as there are pedophiles in society, you can expect that some percentage of them will gravitate toward activities that give them access to children. I would think that the percentage of incidents or complaints would not be greater in swimming than it would be in other children's sports or activities.

With regard to the Chuck Weilgus interview, I think it may be unfair to criticize him too much. You first have to remember that at the time of the interview, USA Swimming (according to the story) was a defendant in ongoing litigation. I don't know what the facts are in the case that is pending, but there may be no basis for legal liability against USA Swimming. Asking for and giving an apology for conduct could be a factor in establishing liability. If I were representing USA Swimming in the litigation, I would not have allowed him to give the interview and instead would have issued a written statement to 20/20. "News" shows like 20/20 don't sell advertising by presenting a fair and balanced report.

I have three daughters who have all swum on teams. There can be no excuse for this type of behavior; however, I think it is a little unrealistic to think that the national organization for swimming or any other sport can be a the frontline of guarding our kids. The kids, parents and team officials (officers, directors, etc.) are the only people who have direct knowledge of things that go on and all of them should act quickly on knowledge of any inappropriate conduct. This type of conduct should be referred immediately to law enforcement.

no200fly
April 13th, 2010, 05:26 PM
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funkyfish
April 13th, 2010, 10:16 PM
Here's a link to an article that ran last week in the East Bay Express, a free weekly distributed in Berkeley, Oakland and the rest of the east side of the SF Bay detailing a recent local incident:
http://www.eastbayexpress.com/gyrobase/swimming-in-sex-abuse/Content?oid=1678180&storyPage=1
Fair and balanced reporting? The article seemed a bit slanted to me. Not saying abuse doesn't occur, but based on the tone of the article it seems that if your child grows up having swam for US Swimming and doesn't get molested, then they were one of the lucky ones.

Frankly I'm surprised that the girl's parents agreed to let her go with the coach by herself.

bigirishape
April 14th, 2010, 09:33 AM
As a father of a 9 year old little girl, stories like this sicken me to the core. There is a fundamental *blip* in some people's brains that makes them forget that certain behaviors are immoral and unacceptable (see the current crisis with the Church, now the Swim Coaches, and even the cases of female teachers and young male students). Maybe there's a chemical associated with that behavior that is missing, maybe it's in abundance...I don't know, but all I know is that it's wrong.

I love swimming. I love watching people swim. I love helping people learn how to swim. I was a lifeguard all throughout high school and college, I was also a swim instructor and a competitive swimmer. I've always thought about coaching a swim team, but so far the opportunity and the time to create such an opportunity has not presented itself.

When I go to a public pool to swim my workout, if the lanes are full of age-groupers and lap swimmers and masters folks, I will sit on the side and observe. I can be watching a 45 year old man doing butterfly and thinking "You know, his kick timing is off...I wonder if I should tell him...", or I could be watching a 10 year old girl doing freestyle and thinking "That coach should work with her on getting her elbows higher..." However in a situation like that, I usually get odd looks from parents when they realize I'm there to swim, but I'm not swimming yet. Then they see me watching people swim, and maybe they think I'm trying to pick up tips. If they see me watching the kids swim, I can only imagine what they think of me.

I guess what I'm trying to say, is that I hope these reports don't cast a black shadow on all males who would like to get into swim coaching at some point. As I said before, I love swimming, I love to watch swimming, I love to help people learn how to swim and swim better.

The whole situation falls back onto the personal responsibility and awareness of the coach. No one-on-one meetings with swimmers. If you have something to say that cannot be said on the deck during practice, you better have a second coach or a parent involved.

Also, any parent that agrees to let their child go on a week long stay in another state with their coach, alone, for a swim meet...well, they're either too trusting, or they're oblivious. If my daughter were swimming and her coach wanted to take her to another state for a meet, even for a day-trip, you bet your sweet hiney that I'd be taking a day off and going along - regardless of how long the trip was or how much I trusted that coach. I'd want to be there for my own personal reassurance, and also to give my child the support that a parent should be there to provide.

no200fly
April 14th, 2010, 11:15 AM
Also, any parent that agrees to let their child go on a week long stay in another state with their coach, alone, for a swim meet...well, they're either too trusting, or they're oblivious. If my daughter were swimming and her coach wanted to take her to another state for a meet, even for a day-trip, you bet your sweet hiney that I'd be taking a day off and going along - regardless of how long the trip was or how much I trusted that coach. I'd want to be there for my own personal reassurance, and also to give my child the support that a parent should be there to provide.

I am interested if your feelings would be different if the coach were female? I remember when I started swimming there were a series of Jr. Olympic meets with qualification for each successive meet up to the National Jr. Olympics. I qualified for the regional meet and my parents really didn't have the money to go and neither could take off work to go, so I went with my coach and the other flyer (from another team) who qualified to go. I think I was 13 or 14 at the time and neither at the time nor now do I think there was anything wrong with it.

I am blessed to not have the financial worries that my parents did while I was growing up and either my wife or I can usually go to any of our kids events. I don't know that I would have a problem with them traveling to a meet with their coaches (both female). I don't know about a week long stay, but I don't think I would have a problem with a weekend meet.

When my youngest daughter was in the 7th grade she participated in an exchange program with a school in Mexico where she stayed for a week at a child's home in Mexico and the girl from Mexico later stayed in our home for a week. We believed that she had the maturity to avoid inappropriate situations and to tell us if she ever felt uncomfortable.

I do worry that we may sometimes be overprotective of our children. I know when we grew up, we roamed the neighborhood with the instruction to be home when the street lights came on. We rarely let our kids out of our sight when they were young.

smontanaro
April 14th, 2010, 12:22 PM
Also, any parent that agrees to let their child go on a week long stay in another state with their coach, alone, for a swim meet...well, they're either too trusting, or they're oblivious.

Or in denial? About ten years ago a friend of one of my kids stepped in front of a car when they were both high or drunk. This friend broke his femur in the accident. We had been dealing with drug and alcohol problems with our own son for awhile and thought we should say something to the friend's mom. She, even though a recovering alcoholic herself, refused to believe that her son was abusing drugs and alcohol.

As the Rockman said (YouTube- The Point), "You see what you want to see and hear what you want to hear."

Skip

Karen Duggan
April 14th, 2010, 12:30 PM
Big Irish Ape-
I had the same thought too. Who on earth would let their child go with a coach, across the country, for a week? Although I can honestly say that I know of at least 5 coaches that I would completely trust with my children. However, deep as my trust is though, I still wouldn't let my children travel alone with them for a week long swim meet. That would be hugely irresponsible on my part (IMHO).

The Fortress
April 14th, 2010, 01:02 PM
Does traveling alone with coach happen that often? Perhaps just on very small teams? My kid has done a lot of travel meets over the years, but she travels by bus, stays in the team hotel with other girls and is heavily chaperoned.

jaegermeister
April 14th, 2010, 01:33 PM
There have been some comments here that seem to try to absolve USA Swimming of responsibility. While I think the ultimate responsibililty is local, to the extent that USA swimming certifies coaches and endorses local teams they share in the liability. I'm not an attourney and that much is obvious to me.

Any organization that has capable risk management should identify this as well. And while this puts USAS in a very difficult position in terms of enforcement, they still have to have clear expectations of conduct. And when an accusation gets dumped in their lap, they have to respond in a fashion that assures safety.

ourswimmer
April 14th, 2010, 02:54 PM
Also, any parent that agrees to let their child go on a week long stay in another state with their coach, alone, for a swim meet...well, they're either too trusting, or they're oblivious.

Or maybe the parents thought the coach was a family friend rather than just a professional who served their child, and were absolutely devastated when the coach abused that relationship. The parents could just be dummies, but I don't think the story gives enough information to justify that conclusion.


There have been some comments here that seem to try to absolve USA Swimming of responsibility. While I think the ultimate responsibililty is local, to the extent that USA swimming certifies coaches and endorses local teams they share in the liability.

Agreed. There are lots of things that the umbrella organization can do to reduce the odds that coaches in its programs will harm athletes, beyond just responding to specific complaints. Several posters have given examples (training, rules). I haven't seen anything here that suggests that USA-S is actually failing to do any of these things, or is doing a worse job than any other youth sports organization, although of course they might be.

aquageek
April 14th, 2010, 03:58 PM
Does traveling alone with coach happen that often? Perhaps just on very small teams? My kid has done a lot of travel meets over the years, but she travels by bus, stays in the team hotel with other girls and is heavily chaperoned.

Our kids would argue overly-chaperoned!

There should never be a situation where an adult coach is ever alone with a child, same sex or different sex, period.

ande
April 14th, 2010, 04:18 PM
Should it be the responsibility of USA swimming to apologize for coaches who had sex with minor athletes (& adult athletes) or should it be the responsibility of the local authorities who prosecute them as criminals?

Banning convicted offenders from contact with minors should be in the terms of the offenders penalty?

What if the offender is a day care worker?
Should the national association of day care workers apologizes?

What if the offender is a teacher?

Unlike a church, where priests are employees of the church. Most coaches aren't employees of USA Swimming, they are employees of clubs, schools, businesses, & non profits.

These organizations should have a screening process in their hiring practices to prevent this type of thing from happening.

Each org should have a code of conduct to prevent this from happening, like BSA's 2 deep leadership. But unfortunately if there's a determined offender, they will figure out a way.

It's horrible that it's happened and I'm sure there are many more situations where the abused remained silent & the offenders never been caught.

I know of a case where a coach was coaching an adult athlete & left his wife to be with the athlete & they are still married to this day.




Alright, USA Swimming. Yes, you should apologize. Step up the protection of our youth and ban these idiots who think they can get their jollies out on the youth of America. Do not become like the catholic church and try to sweep this BS under the rug. Take charge and accept the problems and DEAL WITH IT!

Chris Stevenson
April 14th, 2010, 04:23 PM
Does traveling alone with coach happen that often? Perhaps just on very small teams? My kid has done a lot of travel meets over the years, but she travels by bus, stays in the team hotel with other girls and is heavily chaperoned.

The team I swam for my last two years in HS did not have oodles of people going to big meets. I went with one other swimmer (male) and our coach (also male) to Junior Nationals twice when I was 16. When I was 17, I went alone with my coach to Senior Nationals twice. My parents didn't come to any of those meets. This was a different era, obviously. But it does put a pretty significant extra financial (and sometimes logistical) burden to go to such meets with a small team, if one or both parents need to come too.


I am interested if your feelings would be different if the coach were female?

Maybe I'm wrong, but doesn't it seem like there are very few female head coaches? If so, I wonder why that is true? (I see a number of female assistant coaches locally, though.) Especially since there seem to me to be more girl than boy swimmers.

gobears
April 14th, 2010, 04:50 PM
What if the offender is a day care worker?
Should the national association of day care workers apologizes?

What if the offender is a teacher?

Unlike a church, where priests are employees of the church. Most coaches aren't employees of USA Swimming, they are employees of clubs, schools, businesses, & non profits.

These organizations should have a screening process in their hiring practices to prevent this type of thing from happening.

Each org should have a code of conduct to prevent this from happening, like BSA's 2 deep leadership. But unfortunately if there's a determined offender, they will figure out a way.



Agreed. The attempt to draw a parallel between USAS and the Catholic church is ridiculous also. USAS has never claimed god-ordained moral authority or papal perfection. If USAS has had their heads in the sand, they need to learn from mistakes and make adjustments. Trying to argue this is a scandal the likes of what's gone on in the Catholic church is just silly.

makesense
April 14th, 2010, 05:02 PM
diligence and vigilance will help, but no cure all

http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/04/12/florida.teacher.student.sex/?hpt=Sbin

no200fly
April 14th, 2010, 07:18 PM
The team I swam for my last two years in HS did not have oodles of people going to big meets. I went with one other swimmer (male) and our coach (also male) to Junior Nationals twice when I was 16. When I was 17, I went alone with my coach to Senior Nationals twice. My parents didn't come to any of those meets. This was a different era, obviously. But it does put a pretty significant extra financial (and sometimes logistical) burden to go to such meets with a small team, if one or both parents need to come too.

Maybe I'm wrong, but doesn't it seem like there are very few female head coaches? If so, I wonder why that is true? (I see a number of female assistant coaches locally, though.) Especially since there seem to me to be more girl than boy swimmers.


Same with my HS team. Only two of us qualified for the Texas Invitational in Austin and we went to the meet without parents or coaches.


It is surprising that there are not more women head coaches. My daughter's HS and USA coaches are both female and excellent coaches.

chaos
April 14th, 2010, 08:49 PM
There should never be a situation where an adult coach is ever alone with a child, same sex or different sex, period.

nor should a young swim coach be left alone with one of those cougar swim moms! (you know the ones i'm talking about)

smontanaro
April 14th, 2010, 10:39 PM
Unlike a church, where priests are employees of the church. Most coaches aren't employees of USA Swimming, they are employees of clubs, schools, businesses, & non profits.

These organizations should have a screening process in their hiring practices to prevent this type of thing from happening.


Due to their size and (mostly) volunteer nature many local swim clubs probably lack the resources and/or skills necessary to develop such screening practices without some outside assistance. Perhaps USA Swimming can provide tools/guidelines for clubs to use when hiring coaches. I suspect such guidelines would have to come with disclaimers out the wazoo to keep USA-S off the hook should a club hire a coach who later turns out to be a pedophile.

Skip

swimshark
April 15th, 2010, 07:36 AM
The team I swam for my last two years in HS did not have oodles of people going to big meets. I went with one other swimmer (male) and our coach (also male) to Junior Nationals twice when I was 16. When I was 17, I went alone with my coach to Senior Nationals twice. My parents didn't come to any of those meets. This was a different era, obviously. But it does put a pretty significant extra financial (and sometimes logistical) burden to go to such meets with a small team, if one or both parents need to come too..

Nationals that just happened in Orlando a few weeks ago had 4 from my section of Curl 2 males, 2 females and the head (male) coach. No oodles either.

In HS the 35 year old band director was having an affair with my classmate/ drum major/ 1st chair bassonist. A bunch of us in band talked about it but I don't know that any of us really believed it was true 100%. Two months after graduation, his wife found out it was true and divorced him. My classmate was 17 and had just graduated. Her parents got a restraining order but once she turned 18, she married him. Fast forward 20 years and he's been through a few schools as the band director and is now in Naples, FL directing. He is accused of sexually assaulting a 15 year old in his house. He's still married to my former classmate. He is arrested and all the stuff from 20 years ago comes out. Seems nothing in his background check showed the restraining order or problems he had in 1988. Why?! It could have prevented this from (allegedly) happening again. So if something like this could happen to a teacher, what's to say it wouldn't happen easily to an organization like USA-S where the coaches are employed by the teams and not the organization?

Peter Cruise
April 15th, 2010, 02:08 PM
God ordained moral authority or papal perfection? Only if we talk about FINA...

Peter Cruise
April 15th, 2010, 02:13 PM
Of course the police are the appropriate investigators upon complaint and I don't care who apologizes. What is needful is that all adults who have a role with these clubs (coaches, officials, parents etc) take responsibility to keep their eyes and ears open, get educated to warning signs and commit to prevention.

Redbird Alum
April 16th, 2010, 05:18 PM
When I was a USA Coach, I was also an employee of the YMCA. Our Y had us attend a one hour seminar held at the Y every year that specifically adressed the issue of child abuse. There were certain guidelines in place that we were to follow to avoid a false allegation of sexual abuse. The ones I could remember were as follows:

1. A coach is not to give an athlete a ride home.

2. If a parent is late to pick up a child, two coaches are to remain until the parent or other responsible guardian listed on an appoved pick-up list arrives.

3. A coach is not to travel alone to a meet with an athlete.

4. When talking to an athlete, have another coach present.

5. Communicate through the parent as much as possible.

Anyway, I hope now that this issue has really gotten a ton of attention, clubs will be sure that they have very specific guidelines in place to protect coaches. The bottom line was to avoid being alone with an athlete.

Not a bad list. In fact, if the USA Swimming coach was brought on board in the last few years, they were exposed to this list, provided they follow the registration process...

All USA Swimming coaches must pass a background check every two years, and in the second year there is an extensive training video/online materials/book test that must be passed to maintain USA coaching status. This material contains very similar advice to your list when dealing with children, and also covers differences in dealing with children at different stages of their development though young adult-hood.

Parents should make it their business to ensure any coach/teacher/advisor of their children is properly credentialled. I have no problem sharing my credentials with any parent.

swimshark
April 20th, 2010, 09:05 AM
Another law suit filed. The coach, Aaron was my coach for about 8 months last year. He and I didn't get along at all (he told me I was a waste of lane space and a negative influence on the kids - HA - I'm not in the paper over bad things!) so I left and Im now with another age group team. Rob was hired by Aaron this past Sept.

http://www2.insidenova.com/isn/news/local/article/youth_swimming_sex_abuse_suit_names_occoquan_coach/56070/

Frank Thompson
June 24th, 2010, 07:22 PM
I just saw this story in my local newspaper. This is not good for USA Swimming.

http://www.examiner.com/a-2696322~High_ranking_USA_Swimming_official_touted_ Uchiyama.html

orca1946
June 25th, 2010, 11:59 AM
As a 22 year girls H S coach ,I refused to "rub down" our team , even though other teams in our area did so ! Too much can go wrong as to doing better in meets ! Even the girls that saw this on the other teams questioned this !

slknight
August 11th, 2010, 09:45 PM
Another new story today:

http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/Swimming/usa-swimming-sexual-abuse-olympic-hopeful-swimmer-files/story?id=11378627