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Karen Duggan
April 28th, 2010, 01:42 PM
I was wondering how many master's swimmers think that swimming:

maintains weight
aids weight loss somewhat
aids weight loss greatly

For me, I maintain weight, and unless I kick my yardage WAY up, I don't lose weight.

How about you?

The Fortress
April 28th, 2010, 02:16 PM
None of the above.

Swimming makes me gain weight. I'm a tank compared to when I was a runner. I have a fairly stellar diet and don't eat too little or too much. Running would likely take off 5-10 pounds, but it kills my swimming, so I'm eliminated it.

Karen Duggan
April 28th, 2010, 02:47 PM
That would be a fun comparison: runners vs. swimmers To me it's totally apples vs. oranges.

I didn't think to put that swimming makes people gain weight. I should have put that. Besides you, I don't know of anybody that it makes gain weight.

Nichole
April 28th, 2010, 02:47 PM
Personally, swimming helps me maintain weight, not lose it. If I want to shed poundage I run and reduce my caloric intake.

Found a recent piece in the Dallas Morning News about these very issues. http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/opinion/viewpoints/stories/DN-reynolds_25edi.State.Edition1.32996b0.html

Karen Duggan
April 28th, 2010, 02:49 PM
The NY Times ran the same article on April 18th :agree:

Nichole
April 28th, 2010, 02:58 PM
I remember reading it in the NYT first but I couldn't find it. So that's when it ran, thanks!

Jazz Hands
April 28th, 2010, 03:02 PM
None of the above.

Swimming makes me gain weight. I'm a tank compared to when I was a runner. I have a fairly stellar diet and don't eat too little or too much. Running would likely take off 5-10 pounds, but it kills my swimming, so I'm eliminated it.

Yeah, I notice this a little bit, too (with me, not you :)).

TriBob
April 28th, 2010, 03:10 PM
That would be a fun comparison: runners vs. swimmers To me it's totally apples vs. oranges.

I didn't think to put that swimming makes people gain weight. I should have put that. Besides you, I don't know of anybody that it makes gain weight.

Now you do. :)

I usually put on a few pounds when I get back to swimming. Then it starts to come off. I think it is building muscle then as my endurance returns, I can burn more calories.

2fish&1whale
April 28th, 2010, 03:11 PM
it helps me maintain my sanity!
I can't do one thing only,all the time, drives me nuts and causes me to eventually burn out mentally-I have found that since mixing up all 3(biking,swimming,running+weights)I enjoy excersizing again, and my swimming has improved eventhough I'm only in the pool 2 days per week-but I'm putting in double the distance then before

aztimm
April 28th, 2010, 04:03 PM
None of the above.

Swimming makes me gain weight. I'm a tank compared to when I was a runner. I have a fairly stellar diet and don't eat too little or too much. Running would likely take off 5-10 pounds, but it kills my swimming, so I'm eliminated it.

I checked maintain, buy I think I agree with Leslie.

I haven't done swimming only for 4 years or so, but when I did, I noticed my weight varied more than it does now. I'd swim M-F, and every Monday gain 5# from a weekend of nothing. With my current long run on Sundays, my weight is more consistent; but I've also thrown in some weights 3x a week, and shorter running on Tues and Thurs.

joshua
April 29th, 2010, 10:15 AM
I swim 4-5 times a week, each session is 2000m.-2300m. I try to do my sessions at a good clip so that I get a good fitness effect.
Swimming makes me hungry post-workout so it is possible to gain weight after swimming. I simply try to control my carb intake so that doesn't happen.

Bobinator
April 29th, 2010, 11:51 AM
A calorie is a unit of energy.
Weight bearing sports burn calories at a higher rate. Given the same output of effort a swimmer should burn less calories than a runner.
However a fast distance swimmer should burn more calories than a slow slogger runner.
I find it easy to lose weight running or swimming. It's all a matter of operating on a deficet of calories. You can obtain the deficet by either eating less or doing either exercise more. When the exercise level goes up the calories have to remain the same(or vice-versa too)
I have read shomewhere along the way that swimming in COLD water may produce a thermal-type response from the body and cause it to develop a layer of fat to accomodate and survive.

joshua
April 30th, 2010, 12:39 AM
I have read shomewhere along the way that swimming in COLD water may produce a thermal-type response from the body and cause it to develop a layer of fat to accomodate and survive.

Or only people with protective fat will try to swim in cold water because their bodies are suited to the activity. Just like a guy who is 5"5 won't generally go for basketball. Probably a combination of both genetics, adoption and nutrition.

I remember seeing a report a couple of years ago on "60 Minutes" about long distance cold water swimmer Lynne Cox ("Swimming to Antarctica"). It showed her swimming near Antarctica. The reporter commented (correctly) that she had a large amount of body fat because that is the demand of her sport and does not in anyway mean that she is not a great athlete. I couldn't help thinking (and I don't mean this as an insult) that she reminded me of a seal. She was completely suited to the demands of her chosen sport.

elise526
April 30th, 2010, 01:06 AM
I've thought about this a good bit since I've competed in both running and swimming for a number of years. At times, I've given more focus to one sport than the other. Honestly, I think on the weight loss/gain issue, it is a mental thing, at least for me.

Being thin in running is an advantage, so when I'm primarily focused on running, I become super aware of this. I cut back my calories, lose weight, and really watch what I eat. With swimming, being really thin has hurt my performance in the past, so I let myself eat a little more than when I run. My ideal swimming weight is probably at least 8 pounds more than my ideal running weight.

When I want to be thin, I can lose weight doing either swimming or running, but I have to be aware of how much and how often I eat.

This goes against what I've thought about swimming in the past. Before, I was convinced that swimming was not good for weight control. Now I'm not so sure. I will say that I think swimming tends to build muscle much more than long distance running does. Added muscle means added weight. On the other hand, added muscle mass means you burn more calories.

spell_me
April 30th, 2010, 08:24 AM
I find it easy to lose weight from swimming when I try. If I watch my diet, the pounds fall off quickly. The problem that I sometimes have is that swimming increases my appetite. It's kind of a seasonal thing. During the holidays I give in and overindulge and will allow myself to put on a few pounds. I really eat an awful lot of bad stuff then--I'm sure a normal, non-swimming person would get downright fat. I don't look my best then, but most people would still consider me slim. When I get tired of all the goodies and tired of not being able to wear my smaller clothes, losing the weight seems pretty effortless as long as I keep swimming. It seems even easier since I added strength training to my regimen. Well, I do weigh a little more (from the added muscle), but I think it's easier for me to lose FAT and to be lean and slender.

Swimosaur
April 30th, 2010, 09:44 AM
Last year it was my objective to lose weight, and I lost a lot of weight swimming long slow distance.

This year it's my objective to swim faster, and I've gained some weight, hopefully mostly muscle, swimming shorter, faster intervals.

Gain, lose, or maintain -- I'd select "all of the above".

jbs
April 30th, 2010, 10:22 AM
I'm also in the all of the above category. Since last fall, I've lost a lot of weight. Throughout that period, swimming has been my primary form of exercise.

On the other hand, I was swimming for several years before last fall. During that period, I was basically maintaining weight.

The conclusion I’ve come to for myself is that swimming—like any other form of exercise—is only part of the equation. I used to think that exercise alone would cause me to lose weight. For me, that only worked during the initial first few months, after which I’d stabilize at a certain (still heavy) weight—reach a plateau.

I reached that plateau whether I was running or swimming—I ran for a few years before getting smart and switching to swimming. I only noticed two real differences between running and swimming as far as weight loss/maintenance was concerned. First, running creates more of an appetite suppressant effect than swimming does. Second, swimming develops much more upper body muscle. The combination meant that for me the weight plateau in running was slightly lower than for swimming.

swimmerlady
April 30th, 2010, 01:36 PM
Swimming has helped me lose weight - but I have to train hard.

For me: Did about two years of lap swim at the Y beginning in the fall of 2006. Did lots of yards ( > 5000 at a time ) and toned up, but didn't lose weight. I looked and felt better - but I replaced some fat w/muscle, but was still frustrated b/c the scale didn't budge.

January 2009 - Joined Masters team - started training hard 3x per week (about 2500 per workout). Lost weight over 3 months. (regained it all over summer break while not swimming). September - sent kids back to school & started training again and lost the same 10 pounds.

December 2009 to now - Still swimming 3 x 2500M workouts but really began to focus on the diet component and lost another 20 pounds.

Maintaining the loss has been easy so far. I'm nervous about finding the time to swim when my kids are home this summer. I never want to have to lose that much weight again because it was hard, and took alot of discipline. I also know that I really can't ever stop swimming because it will creep back on exactly like it did last year.