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ande
May 6th, 2010, 02:45 PM
Swim Slang is like the urban dictionary for the swimming community,
It's the terms we use.
please submit:

1) the word or phrase or acronym or term,

2) it's definition, links to videos, &

3) USE it in a sentence

4) offer other forms of the word

ie

SDK is an acronym for Streamline Dolphin Kick,
some call it underwaters or dolphins.
It's where swimmers dolphin kick underwater off of starts & turns.
You tend to see them more in sprints

Michael Ross has an excellent SDK.

SDKed, SDKing, SDKs, SDKer

That Guy
May 6th, 2010, 03:07 PM
piano - when all your muscles seize up and you can barely move forward anymore, you are swimming with a piano on your back. Pace your races correctly and this should never happen to you.

"Oh wow, look at the size of the piano on That Guy. Five bucks says he doesn't finish."
"Hey man, good job dodging the piano. You went out so fast, I thought you were doomed. Is that a best time?"
"SING US A SONG, YOU'RE THE PIANO MAN, SING US A SONG TONIGHT..."

Edit: here's a video link of Rebecca Soni at Worlds last summer. The piano drops on her at about the 4:18 mark.
YouTube- Nadja Higl - World Champion - 200 Breast Rome 2009

And here's what NOT to do: somehow, the thread about that race did not include the word piano anywhere!
Soni swims great 170m Breast - U.S. Masters Swimming Discussion Forums

Another edit: calculating the difference between 100 splits in a 200 event helps identify pianos even if you weren't there.
3 or less: could have gone out faster (arguable for the 200 free and 200 back)
4-5: good
6-7: try to start out a bit slower next time
8-9: that had to hurt
10+: piano
20+: srsly... what were you thinking

tjrpatt
May 6th, 2010, 03:38 PM
slackers-swimmers who leave after the 30 minute mark of a 2 hour practice. These species is more prevalent at age group programs where the coaches might look the other way at that. The choice destination after the 30 minute mark is the locker room or the local pizza joint. Oh, if there is a ice cream parlor nearby, they will be there too. The odd thing is that they still look like they did the 2 hours practice by their skinny build.

"Slacker, it has been 30 minutes, isn't it time for your 90 minute shower."

wall huggers-swimmers who stand at the wall and getting in the way of turns. They are really annoying when they pull that crap during an IM set.

"Move, you freaking wall hugger!"

animal-I have been call this many times since my core events are the 200 fly, 400 IM, distance free events. Or, maybe this is directed at the more husky swimmers that do these events.

"You were such an animal in your 1500."

debaru
May 6th, 2010, 05:38 PM
Noodler

Noodler is a derogatory term for someone who is fond of working out in the pool using a foam noodle, and who often complains that the pool is either too cold or too hot, and often has an annoying habit of hogging the lane of a lap pool.

"Oh, man -- look at all the noodlers in the pool today!"

Video reference - Future Noodler in training YouTube- Pool Noodler

For alternate terms, please see Urban Dictionary (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=noodler) -- unfortunately, they are far too racy for me to post them here. :blush:

orca1946
May 6th, 2010, 06:06 PM
Jerk - one who swims faster than you do

dope - one that swims slower than you do

hog - one that is in the middle always

tailgater - one that is always on your feet

JimRude
May 6th, 2010, 06:33 PM
"Dragger" - someone who leaves less than 5 seconds behind you on a tough repeat set, and takes advantage of the ability to drag off of you. "Off my feet, dragger!"

"Bagger" - someone who gives much less than the required level of effort for the bulk of a difficult repeat set, saving energy for the last one or two repeats. "He's a bagger".

The worst - "he's draggin' and baggin'".

aquageek
May 6th, 2010, 07:03 PM
Noodler

Noodler is a derogatory term for someone who is fond of working out in the pool using a foam noodle, and who often complains that the pool is either too cold or too hot, and often has an annoying habit of hogging the lane of a lap pool.


No noodler in the history of known noodling has ever complained about a pool being too hot. If you have seen such a blue-hair please immediately take a picture and post.

qbrain
May 6th, 2010, 07:47 PM
CSK - Chris Stevenson Kick

kristilynn
May 6th, 2010, 09:21 PM
Sandbagger
Someone who enters a race with a seed time significantly slower than their actual time.
Did you see that sandbagger in lane 10? Don't you hate it when you don't get to swim in the same heat as someone because she always sandbags???
sandbagging, sandbagged, sandbaggish, sandbags

debaru
May 7th, 2010, 12:55 AM
No noodler in the history of known noodling has ever complained about a pool being too hot. If you have seen such a blue-hair please immediately take a picture and post.

LOL!

Aye-aye Cap'n. I'll keep my eyes peeled and will provide a full report upon such a sighting. :bump:

tjrpatt
May 7th, 2010, 09:43 AM
No noodler in the history of known noodling has ever complained about a pool being too hot. If you have seen such a blue-hair please immediately take a picture and post.

that is so true. Where there is an above 80 degree pool, noodlers are plentiful and people are using them.

jbs
May 7th, 2010, 09:51 AM
that is so true. Where there is an above 80 degree pool, noodlers are plentiful and people are using them.

Oh yes, but unless the pool is in the UPPER 80s, noodlers are still complaining about the pool being too cold.

ande
May 7th, 2010, 10:55 AM
in the south noodlers are people who catch huge catfish with their hands (http://z.about.com/d/urbanlegends/1/0/U/8/catfish1.jpg)

Images (http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&q=noodling+catfish&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=univ&ei=kSbkS7LWDYW0lQfRpeD_AQ&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=7&ved=0CEYQsAQwBg)

we don't have either kind of noodler in the swim center.

tjrpatt
May 7th, 2010, 05:00 PM
Oh yes, but unless the pool is in the UPPER 80s, noodlers are still complaining about the pool being too cold.

If the my Y pool is not 83 degrees, some old lady is calling the local TV station complaining how cold the water is. Sometimes, it feels like boiled water.

ElaineK
May 7th, 2010, 07:12 PM
If the my Y pool is not 83 degrees, some old lady is calling the local TV station complaining how cold the water is. Sometimes, it feels like boiled water.
I can relate to that! After swimming way too many months in an 86 degree pool, I finally did some research and presented it to the HOA manager, so I would have facts to back up my :bitching: about the water temp. being waaaay too hot. I was only able to get them to turn it down to 84 and the noodlers went NUTS! :bitching::bitching::bitching: I'm still swimming in (as you describe) boiled water and they are still tip-toeing into the pool complaining, "Ohhhh, it's SOOO cold!" :afraid:
And, I'm sweatin' bullets... :badday:

...BUT, I am still in :bliss: just being ABLE to swim! :D

Lump
May 7th, 2010, 07:38 PM
slackers-swimmers who leave after the 30 minute mark of a 2 hour practice. These species is more prevalent at age group programs where the coaches might look the other way at that. The choice destination after the 30 minute mark is the locker room or the local pizza joint. Oh, if there is a ice cream parlor nearby, they will be there too. The odd thing is that they still look like they did the 2 hours practice by their skinny build.

"Slacker, it has been 30 minutes, isn't it time for your 90 minute shower."


I always thought that was "Sprinter"?! No?!:dunno:

tjrpatt
May 7th, 2010, 07:43 PM
I always thought that was "Sprinter"?! No?!:dunno:

Most of the time, they are. But, at my age group club, I saw breaststroke and backstroke specialist exhibit these traits. Plus, they were better at the 200 of these events.

swim53
May 7th, 2010, 08:03 PM
Back to the "slang"......ELITE: #1 or #2 of the top ten in multiple events

swim53
May 7th, 2010, 08:06 PM
"DIVE-OVERS"...the meet is so large that the person in the heat before you hangs on the lane rope while you (the next heat) starts.....even in backstroke! (Used to save time)

nkfrench
May 7th, 2010, 08:12 PM
DQ - Disqualified
DNF - Did Not Finish (started the event but got out of the pool before completing the full distance)
NS - No Swim (was entered in event but swimmer did not show up)
SCR - Scratch (was entered in the event but Swimmer notified the meet host of intent to not compete after all)
DFL - Swimmer has swum the event complying with the rules, but has finished Dead F___ing Last.

Chase Starts - Heats 2 thru n for a particular swim event will be started before the previous heat has finished. If seed times are inaccurate or if the starter messes up, some swimmers in the earlier heat can get "caught" by the next heat that is chasing them. It helps the timeline on big meets but geez, I need a little time to recoup before I try to climb out of the pool.

knelson
May 7th, 2010, 10:10 PM
even in backstroke!

Seriously? I've never seen this.

That Guy
May 7th, 2010, 11:14 PM
Seriously? I've never seen this.

You were there at LCM Nats in '08... backstroke "flyovers" were in effect... and they're pretty creepy.

craig68
May 8th, 2010, 12:15 AM
leech: swimmer who leave less than 5 seconds and drafts off the swimmer ahead of him, often touching their toes, but refuses to go ahead....

"Dude, you're totally leeching off me. Either back up or go"
"No he is not does work hard. He's a total leech"

knelson
May 8th, 2010, 12:37 PM
You were there at LCM Nats in '08... backstroke "flyovers" were in effect... and they're pretty creepy.

I guess I didn't watch any of the backstroke events. So you do your start while the other guy/gal is still in the water? That is weird.

That Guy
May 8th, 2010, 03:19 PM
I guess I didn't watch any of the backstroke events. So you do your start while the other guy/gal is still in the water? That is weird.

I suppose it wasn't an issue for the 50 back event, which I didn't watch. I swam the 200. Having someone next to you for your start isn't as weird as after your heat, when you're waiting next to someone else while they're doing their start.

nhc
May 8th, 2010, 03:29 PM
piano - when all your muscles seize up and you can barely move forward anymore, you are swimming with a piano on your back.

Very descriptive. Merely thinking of this will slow me down.:cool:

nhc
May 8th, 2010, 03:30 PM
No noodler in the history of known noodling has ever complained about a pool being too hot. If you have seen such a blue-hair please immediately take a picture and post.

Exactly what I was going to say. Also they are usually women aged 60+.

Midas
May 8th, 2010, 05:57 PM
This one might cause some discussion...

"Lap" (noun)--while most non-swimmers might think of a lap as a "complete circuit" (which would imply coming back to the starting point (i.e., two lengths of a pool)), many swimmers consider a "lap" to be a single length of the pool. I think this usage of "lap" is clearly swimming slang. "I didn't breath at all on the second lap of my 50 free."

"Lap" (verb)--this means to pass somebody in a race or set by a full circuit (two lengths) of the pool. Note the inconsistency with the slang way many swimmers define "lap" as a noun. "Lap" as a verb may not be swimming slang at all. "Micheal Phelps could lap me in the 100 fly."

Novaova
May 8th, 2010, 06:42 PM
This one might cause some discussion...

"Lap" (noun)--while most non-swimmers might think of a lap as a "complete circuit" (which would imply coming back to the starting point (i.e., two lengths of a pool)), many swimmers consider a "lap" to be a single length of the pool. I think this usage of "lap" is clearly swimming slang. "I didn't breath at all on the second lap of my 50 free."

"Lap" (verb)--this means to pass somebody in a race or set by a full circuit (two lengths) of the pool. Note the inconsistency with the slang way many swimmers define "lap" as a noun. "Lap" as a verb may not be swimming slang at all. "Micheal Phelps could lap me in the 100 fly."
I've always considered a lap of anything to be a circuit which returns the racer to the point of origin, whether circumferential or out-and-back. Is this an idiosyncratic use of the term specific only to swimming, or is it a localized misuse of the term which is not indicative of the membership at large?

SwimStud
May 8th, 2010, 07:46 PM
I've always considered a lap of anything to be a circuit which returns the racer to the point of origin, whether circumferential or out-and-back. Is this an idiosyncratic use of the term specific only to swimming, or is it a localized misuse of the term which is not indicative of the membership at large?


It's odd..swimmers pride themselves on being more of a cerebral bunch of jocks...yet seem to have issues with understanding the difference between a length and a lap...a bit like the ambiguity between "freestyle" and front crawl.
:bolt:

knelson
May 8th, 2010, 09:12 PM
I still maintain that use of the word "lap" as a noun labels you as a competitive swimming tyro. It's tantamount to wearing your goggles around your neck.

stillwater
May 8th, 2010, 09:40 PM
I still maintain that use of the word "lap" as a noun labels you as a competitive swimming tyro. It's tantamount to wearing your goggles around your neck.

Pshaw.

Not knowing the real meaning of a lap means you are a tri-geek, noodler, or perhaps from a country to the north.

That Guy
May 8th, 2010, 10:32 PM
I still maintain that use of the word "lap" as a noun labels you as a competitive swimming tyro. It's tantamount to wearing your goggles around your neck.

Yep. I had this conversation a couple years ago:

Her: How long is this pool?
Me: 25 yards.
Her: How many laps are a quarter mile?
Me: 18 lengths of the pool.

Although she was very obviously a tri-n00b preparing for a sprint, to her credit she was there swimming multiple times per week for a couple months. Proper preparation: :applaud:

ivan504
May 10th, 2010, 09:05 AM
...
hog - one that is in the middle always
...

Perhaps the same meaning of a Portuguese slang whose translation to English would be "lane cork". :)

aquageek
May 10th, 2010, 09:57 AM
I still maintain that use of the word "lap" as a noun labels you as a competitive swimming tyro. It's tantamount to wearing your goggles around your neck.

In that vein, how many times have you had the following conversations with your non-swim friends:

Friend - How many miles did you swim today?
Me - I swam 4,000 yards
Friend - How many miles is that?
Me - I have no idea
Friend - How many laps is that?
Me - 200
Friend - Is that 200 there and back or 200 one way?
Me - Wanna get a beer?

That Guy
May 10th, 2010, 10:35 AM
lawnchair - some backstrokers with poor body position appear to be lounging in lawnchairs. They swim backstroke uphill and bend their hips and knees all the time. You don't want to hear your backstroke described this way. If you do, you need to straighten out your body and start breaking the surface of the water with your feet when you kick.

sack of potatoes - there are different strategies for how to dive off the blocks. Most people figure out that the outstretched hands should enter first and the feet should enter last. There are also the spazzes who gyrate in mid-air and end up with their hands and feet entering at the same time and their rear ends entering last, often accompanied by a huge noise. At any Masters meet, you are probably going to see a few bellyflops, perfectly flat entries that are perhaps the result of a foot slipping on the block. On rare occasions though, you get to watch a sack of potatoes dive into the water. It looks like someone threw a bag of potatoes off the starting block. These poor folks' feet hit the water first, and their hands and head enter the water last. They do not move in mid-air. And they do it the same way every time. Is it fear? I don't know. Whenever I see it, I feel amused and sad at the same time.

zone zero - ok, you've probably never heard this one. I invented it and have never actally used the term in conversation. It describes lap swimmers who swim with their heads out of the water, their hair dry, and no elevated pulse rate. They are not working on their Vo2max, their anaerobic threshold, or their aerobic threshold. They do not disturb the water. They are barely moving. It's kind of impressive in a weird way, exercising without ever entering Zone 1 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Exercise_zones.png).

Lui
May 10th, 2010, 10:51 AM
Does anyone know the expression logs? In Germany swimmers call the people at pools logs who just swim this old lady breaststroke(with their head above the water) while blocking a lane. The problem at German public pools is that they don't have any lanes(slow lane, medium lane, fast lane). People basically swim back and forth with no rules which makes swimming almost impossible.

That Guy
May 11th, 2010, 03:46 PM
gridge - a few years ago, someone on this forum typo'd the word grudge as gridge but everyone loved it so it stuck. it sounds like it should be a word, so now it is. it is a noun, verb, adjective, and adverb all rolled into one, usable in any sentence provided that you're talking about a grudge match of some sort.

"So I entered the 100 free in next week's meet. Any gridges out there?"
"You still owe me a beer from the last gridge!"
"Watch out for That Guy, he's always gridging people."
"She handed me a beer after the race. I asked why and it turns out that she had declared a secret gridge against me, but I won. So... if... she had won, she would have drank the beer herself, and I never would have known about it?"

How did it possibly take us until now to remember to put gridge in this thread? I blame myself.

pwolf66
May 11th, 2010, 03:56 PM
How did it possibly take us until now to remember to put gridge in this thread? I blame myself.


I blame you also :angel:

adsollm
May 11th, 2010, 04:10 PM
In that vein, how many times have you had the following conversations with your non-swim friends:

Friend - How many miles did you swim today?
Me - I swam 4,000 yards
Friend - How many miles is that?
Me - I have no idea
Friend - How many laps is that?
Me - 200
Friend - Is that 200 there and back or 200 one way?
Me - Wanna get a beer?

your math confuses me, but i like your style

That Guy
May 11th, 2010, 07:00 PM
red dot special - after your third or fourth shave at a multi-day championship meet, you are a red dot special. Use some moisturizer after the meet is over.

babysitter - age group swim coach who does not really know anything about swimming technique. Babysitters are fine for the little kids, but they are comically useless with older, more experienced swimmers.

Allen Stark
May 11th, 2010, 08:55 PM
I still maintain that use of the word "lap" as a noun labels you as a competitive swimming tyro. It's tantamount to wearing your goggles around your neck.

Agreed.When is the last time you asked another swimmer how many laps they swam,it is always how far did you swim and you expect the answer in yds/M.

nkfrench
May 11th, 2010, 10:20 PM
Superman Start, Superman Turn - the "streamline" is with hands at shoulder width and the head is erect, eyes forward. Only works well if you have the cape to go with it.

Flotsam - individual who does not seem to actually be moving their limbs but are merely floating in the "lap swim only" lane.

Manatee - similar to noodler, must be super obese.

poolraat
May 12th, 2010, 08:58 PM
Manatee - similar to noodler, must be super obese.

Aquapottamus - see above