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View Full Version : With the season drawing to a close........



rtodd
November 11th, 2010, 06:11 PM
OK,

My last swim was last week in brisk 48 deg water in Long Island Sound. I'm done. Who is still hanging in there and what's the temp?

E=H2O
November 11th, 2010, 06:58 PM
The local swimming pool's heater broke down. They cancelled all lessons and classes. Thoughtfully they posted a sign at the door to warn people of the cold water . . . 78

chaos
November 11th, 2010, 08:15 PM
i'm planning on a coney island thanksgiving day swim....

rtodd
November 11th, 2010, 08:52 PM
Doing that? Good luck!

G_Swim
November 12th, 2010, 12:09 PM
Mine is Long Island Sound, too - I think the water is still above 50 (barely)...I went both days last weekend without the wetsuit. Yesterday I swam, but broke down and wore the wetsuit. Even so, when I first started swimming I felt as though I had been hit in the torso and it was extremely uncomfortable. After a minute or so I got used to it and the swim was fine except for the annoyance of wearing the wetsuit.

I'm going to continue swimming until December, I think. I have vague plans of doing at least one more swim without the suit, but I am having some motivation problems in that area right now.

E=H2O
November 12th, 2010, 12:25 PM
I know this will make me sound like a wimp, but why do people swim in very cold water if they are not trying to acclimatize for a cold water race or swim? I always feel that it's better to go for a 2 hour swim with a wetsuit on than to go naked and have to get out after 30 minutes because I am cold.

rtodd
November 12th, 2010, 01:19 PM
Greg,

Hes the water probably is low 50's , but where we measure is near "cold springs". With the wetsuit it is manageable, but its the other things that discourage, like cold air, wind and chop that you get this time of year.

Daniel Slosberg
November 12th, 2010, 05:41 PM
...but why do people swim in very cold water if they are not trying to acclimatize for a cold water race or swim? I always feel that it's better to go for a 2 hour swim with a wetsuit on than to go naked and have to get out after 30 minutes because I am cold.

Our water temp here in SoCal doesn't get below mid-50s, so I'm not sure if you'd consider that "very cold water," but here are my reasons for going naked:
1. I don't like wetsuits. I love the way the water feels against my skin sans intermediary neoprene.
2. I get a great workout quickly; the water does much of the work for me.
3. Bragging rights.

Of course, if I was training for a long swim, I'd want to go the 2 hours. But as long as there's none such in the offing, I'll take the shorter swim.

-Daniel

Chicken of the Sea
November 12th, 2010, 07:51 PM
I know this will make me sound like a wimp, but why do people swim in very cold water if they are not trying to acclimatize for a cold water race or swim? I always feel that it's better to go for a 2 hour swim with a wetsuit on than to go naked and have to get out after 30 minutes because I am cold.

I'm too fat for my wetsuit. For practical purposes, I suppose, I'm already wearing one :)

rtodd
November 13th, 2010, 10:05 AM
Low 40's, that's nasty. Where is that?

E=H2O
November 13th, 2010, 10:31 AM
I'm too fat for my wetsuit. For practical purposes, I suppose, I'm already wearing one :)

It can make a big difference. In 2008 I raced more triathlons than open water and weighed 168 (very light for me). A couple of the swims were in 60 water including one that I was in the water for almost 2 hours. I definitely felt cold when I got out of those. In fact in the longer one I experienced getting cold inside for the first time as warm blood rushed to the surface. A very weird feeling. Last year I only did OW races and my training was limited by injuries. I bloated up to 192. I swam in one race at 57 and again was in the water for almost 2 hours. When I got out I was not cold at all. Fat does make a huge difference. Next year I'll be racing on the lighter side early in the season and then putting on some insulation for a Catalina attempt in September.

orca1946
November 13th, 2010, 12:53 PM
Sorry this old guy is finished for the season, Cancun looks really good now !!!

Chicken of the Sea
November 13th, 2010, 02:19 PM
It can make a big difference. In 2008 I raced more triathlons than open water and weighed 168 (very light for me). A couple of the swims were in 60 water including one that I was in the water for almost 2 hours. I definitely felt cold when I got out of those. In fact in the longer one I experienced getting cold inside for the first time as warm blood rushed to the surface. A very weird feeling. Last year I only did OW races and my training was limited by injuries. I bloated up to 192. I swam in one race at 57 and again was in the water for almost 2 hours. When I got out I was not cold at all. Fat does make a huge difference. Next year I'll be racing on the lighter side early in the season and then putting on some insulation for a Catalina attempt in September.

getting cold on the inside is horrible, isn't it? Fat doesn't help you feel any more comfortable but I guess it does help with the insides. I don't think I've ever swum in cold water "lean" hehehe

G_Swim
November 13th, 2010, 11:12 PM
I don't swim in pools, actually; I don't like the chlorine. Plus I do like the cold water; it's just been a little challenging lately. Today, however, was AWESOME! After Thursday's really cold swim, I was actually scared to get in the water with the wetsuit today, but it went really well. An extra cap and I never even felt cold (of course it helps that the air temp is above 60 F). Tomorrow I'm thinking about swimming first with the wetsuit and then going back in with just a bathing suit. Like Daniel Slosberg, I also like the feel of the cold water against my skin, I find that I get an awesome workout in the cold water (though I often have to nap afterwards; I'm exhausted after coming out) and there is something about the bragging rights...if I come out and there's no amazed walkers on the beach, I have to say I'm a little disappointed. Also, I go for the same swim wetsuit or bathing suit (a little more than half an hour now).

RTodd: I totally agree; cold air, wind and chop are the kind of things that break my spirit this time of year (especially the chop).

Chicken of the Sea
November 14th, 2010, 01:47 PM
The outside temperature makes a huge difference for me. I'd rather swim in 50 degree water with 70 outside than vice versa

E=H2O
November 14th, 2010, 02:24 PM
The outside temperature makes a huge difference for me. I'd rather swim in 50 degree water with 70 outside than vice versa

You must be a floater.

G_Swim
November 15th, 2010, 09:55 AM
I've finally figured out the solution to swimming in the cold water without the wetsuit, and it's so obvious I can't believe I didn't think of it sooner! Yesterday I wore the wetsuit to the beach and brought a regular bathing suuit along too. I went in with the wetsuit and swam for half an hour or so and then got out, took off the wetsuit and put on the regular bathing suit and then went right back in. Since the worst part of getting in - putting the face in - was over, it was easy to just swim for another twenty minutes or so.

mjtyson
November 16th, 2010, 07:15 AM
I know this will make me sound like a wimp, but why do people swim in very cold water if they are not trying to acclimatize for a cold water race or swim? I always feel that it's better to go for a 2 hour swim with a wetsuit on than to go naked and have to get out after 30 minutes because I am cold.

Is there a "Like" button? I'm with you!

G_Swim
November 16th, 2010, 10:04 AM
That is an interesting find regarding the wetsuit no-wetsuit sequence. Previously, how were you entering the water to start a skin swim?


Just walk in and keep walking until I'm stomach deep and then start swimming, face down. I count strokes, knowing that after, say, 40 strokes, that headache will be gone.

I think I've reached a new level of acclimatization - what was nearly unbearable last thurs. was downright balmy last night. Here's to December!

E=H2O
November 16th, 2010, 11:52 AM
That is an interesting find regarding the wetsuit no-wetsuit sequence. Previously, how were you entering the water to start a skin swim? For example, my ritual is to walk directly in to the top of my swimsuit, with arms straight at my side such that my hands, wrists and forearms are submerged. I stand there for a bit, essentially still, then walk in deeper to the point that my elbows are in the water. I again stand around, essentially still, look at my wrist watch periodically then put that arm back in the water and making sure to exhale completely on each breath. When the watch is about to read a full minute, I start my forerunner 305 under my cap and push off. For the first ten strokes or so, I make sure my mouth is out of the water when I exhale in case I have a gasping reflex. When i feel all systems are a go, i start breathing normally. Later in the swim, I exhale slowly so that the the bubbles wash around my lips, which is one technique to keep them as warm as possible in order to preserve as much feeling in them as possible, because if they are numb, then I am more likely to be oblivious to the fact that a wave about to wash into my mouth as I am about to breath.

I'm old school. I start up the beach as far as i can get. I start running to the water screaming at the top of my lungs while simultaneously flailing my arms wildly over my head. As soon as my feet touch the water I start jerking them up with my knees high as if I am walking on hot coals. I continue in this motion until I lose my balance and fall over face first - usually in 1 foot of water. I stand up, wiped the wet sand on my face, then turn around and run up the beach, once again screaming at the top of my lungs. I repeat this "routine" until I have completely adjusted to the water temperature, or too exhausted to swim.

Chicken of the Sea
November 16th, 2010, 04:53 PM
I'm old school. I start up the beach as far as i can get. I start running to the water screaming at the top of my lungs while simultaneously flailing my arms wildly over my head. As soon as my feet touch the water I start jerking them up with my knees high as if I am walking on hot coals. I continue in this motion until I lose my balance and fall over face first - usually in 1 foot of water. I stand up, wiped the wet sand on my face, then turn around and run up the beach, once again screaming at the top of my lungs. I repeat this "routine" until I have completely adjusted to the water temperature, or too exhausted to swim.

I drink a very large cup of coffee in the car on the way to the lake. By the time I get there I'm usually so desperate to pee (the toilets close on labour day) that I have to run from the car, stripping my clothes off as I go, barely making it into the water in time.

pendaluft
November 17th, 2010, 10:15 AM
I'm old school. I start up the beach as far as i can get. I start running to the water screaming at the top of my lungs while simultaneously flailing my arms wildly over my head. As soon as my feet touch the water I start jerking them up with my knees high as if I am walking on hot coals. I continue in this motion until I lose my balance and fall over face first - usually in 1 foot of water. I stand up, wiped the wet sand on my face, then turn around and run up the beach, once again screaming at the top of my lungs. I repeat this "routine" until I have completely adjusted to the water temperature, or too exhausted to swim.


please please please post a video

beireland
November 25th, 2010, 01:57 PM
There is a lot of where you live and individual susceptibility. I'm pretty good down to the mid-50s. Since I live in SoCal(like Dan), I can swim year round in the ocean without a wetsuit. Other folks live in places where the winter water gets too cold or are more susceptible to cold water so it doesn't work as well for them.

Trust me, if the water got to 52 or colder, I'd be wearing a wetsuit or swimming in pools all the time. Probably the latter.

Donalb
November 29th, 2010, 11:42 AM
It's about 8 or 9 C (46-48) now in Ireland depending where you are. Yesterday we had snow & ice right down the water line, that's a first for me. Still ok for half an hour at 9 C.

Having the coldest Nov in 40 years so colder than normal this time of year. But training for the British Cold Water Swimming champs in January, expected temp 1 to 3C (34-37) but Fresh water so it'll feel even worse.

2 friends are near a lake and training in 6C, 1 friend is in Sweden and training in 3 to 4C sea (Check Steve's post of him yesterday Sun 28th on Daily News of OW.)

Donalb
November 30th, 2010, 03:58 AM
Normally no, but if this weather continues then the lakes will get below 5C. However one friend told me last night that the Lido in London is already down to 4. I'm terrified!

Donalb
November 30th, 2010, 04:30 PM
Well, last year I learned that was a very noticeable difference between 7 & 5C. I think every degree change below 10 is noticeable (for me).
I have an OW blog. The search item people kept inputting was "how cold is too cold?". Eventually I had to write something.
I divided the possible answers into 3:
-1 degree warmer than it is now,
-Whatever it is now,
-1 degree colder than it is now.
Experience moves you from 1 through 2 to 3. Or at least, I hope so. Having survived 5C last year, I figured I could do 4. But that huge jump from >5C to <5C seems daunting. I prefer the incremental improvement in ability for myself.

I'd like to see any relevant info. I'm that kind of guy... PM me & I'll send you my email for the PDF.

Thanks for the congrats. I didn't think I'd written about it here. So I saw from stalking your posts you know Ned & dream about SE Ireland (where I am)? I assume you heard about my swim from Ned so? Are you thinking about coming for the distance camp next year?
It took me a few week to get my head around it (my Channel swim). I started with being a bit embarassed about being sooo much longer than my hoped for time, and then I saw the reaction of all my Channel friends and now, I wouldn't swap my swim for a sub 10 hour. There's no comparison between a record speed swim in calm weather and long swims in bad conditions. I learned too much about myself with everything that happened. If there is a downside, it's that I have to keep having to explain the time with what happened. In swimming circles here, I can now introduce myself "the guy who went under the boat...twice"

Donalb
December 1st, 2010, 04:35 AM
Cheers. I firmly believe there is no "Channel caliber". This is a sport that is dictated not by swim ability, (I'm average) but by desire & drive.
How much do you want to do it? As you've probably seen, people will help, expecially Channel swimmers who will do what they can. I had a guy contact me from a forum about 3 months ago. He's already got a training plan, he's met Channel swimmers in San Francisco & New York, all willing to help. The "brotherhood" will help.

The Distance Week is a great week. The overall distance this year was 140k (meters) but it was gradual, worked very well. And no-one is forcing anyone to do anything.

Also, (as no-one knows better than me), time means nothing in the Channel. All that counts is standing up in France.

And to do The Mouth of Hell (the North Channel), you have to have an English Channel done, if you are thinking about it.

ViveBene
December 9th, 2010, 08:58 PM
Cheers. I firmly believe there is no "Channel caliber". This is a sport that is dictated not by swim ability, (I'm average) but by desire & drive.
...
Also, (as no-one knows better than me), time means nothing in the Channel. All that counts is standing up in France.

And to do The Mouth of Hell (the North Channel), you have to have an English Channel done, if you are thinking about it.

I finally got back to your blog. Good grief!
:bow:
Distance camp sounds great. I am relieved that my aspirations stop well short of the Channel.