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Rich Abrahams
December 23rd, 2010, 10:32 PM
The only time I ever circle swim is during warm up at a meet. I'm unsure about one aspect of how to do it properly. If I'm coming into a wall for a turn, do I veer to the left before the wall and then push of straight or do I swim into the wall straight (on the right side) and then push off at an angle? Also, If I want to stop, do I hang out all the way to the right side or left side of the lane (assuming I'm facing the wall)? I've always done it one particular way, but was told recently that the other way was correct. Several beers ride on the answer.

Thanks, Rich

Glenn
December 23rd, 2010, 10:36 PM
What kind of beer?

Rich Abrahams
December 23rd, 2010, 10:49 PM
What kind of beer?

If I win, I'd go for one of my two favorites; either Fullers ESB or Great Divide Titan IPA.

Glenn
December 23rd, 2010, 10:52 PM
Ok, well in that case....

Swim into the wall to the left side (facing the wall), and push off straight.

If you are resting at the wall, rest on the right side.

swimshark
December 24th, 2010, 06:51 AM
Ok, well in that case....

Swim into the wall to the left side (facing the wall), and push off straight.

If you are resting at the wall, rest on the right side.

I agree. Do we get beers now?

rtodd
December 24th, 2010, 09:12 AM
If I have closed the gap, I swim straight into the wall without drifting to the center to give the person ahead room. If I have alot of gap, I will drift to the center when I see the person ahead go by. If I stop it is usually to the left side since sometimes swimmers come straight in on the right side as mentioned above. Just what I do, maybe not necessarily right, but it works for me.

shahboz
December 24th, 2010, 09:24 AM
Flip in the center and stop on the left (facing the wall) so swimmers behind you can finish. If you are in a crowded warm up lane and stop on the wall just don't block the + on the wall. ;-)

osterber
December 24th, 2010, 09:47 AM
What rtodd said. You should always flip as far to the left as possible. Depending on how closely people are together, that might mean the person in front of you is in the left corner, and you're in the center. If you flip in the right corner, you're guaranteed to hit someone who is very close behind you because there is nowhere else for them to go.

-Rick

Bobinator
December 24th, 2010, 09:58 AM
Our team swims the same as described by Glen and swimshark!
I want to swim where you've been swimming and not have to circle with anyone!!!! That sounds nice!! I dislike having someone on my heels going into the wall on Free/Backstroke. I feel like I know what I'm doing but I'm never really sure they know what they are doing! Collisions hurt!!!!! :bighug:

debaru
December 24th, 2010, 10:40 AM
When we circle swim at my club, we turn left and hang left, but finish right at the end of the interval (as each person finishes, they move left, and so on).

Karl_S
December 24th, 2010, 10:46 AM
If you are in a crowded warm up lane and stop on the wall just don't block the + on the wall. ;-)
IMO, this is the key. During crowded warmup, the "+" on the wall needs to be clear. Stop and or rest as close to the "corners" of the lane as possible to keep the wall clear for people turning. As to whether one should swim in straight and push off to the right, or swim in to the left and push off straight, I think you have to adjust to the traffic in the lane. If someone is close in front of you, you will have to wait until the last instant to drift to the center for the turn. If someone is close behind you, you have to push off to the right to clear the + as fast as possible.

chowmi
December 24th, 2010, 11:49 AM
Rich,

To directly answer your question, I think you should be more on the left side or at least directly on the + when your feet ultimately land on the wall. You are more out of the way of the person behind you; it really doesn't matter where you are in relation to the person in front of you (except to avoid being too close and getting your fingers broken). Plus I am not a fan of trying to change trajectory when in the push off. When you approach, don't veer sharply; start angling early. You are going to be close to the person in front of you; just get used to having no personal space at that point. But always try to push off in perfect position.

On the wall, it is better to stay in the "starting corner" so that you avoid having to cross over people and increase the risk of someone jumping in who does not realize you are going to push off. However, people behind you will also stop and then you get "boxed in", either in that corner or you are waiting under the flags on the lanerope due to lots of people hanging about.

The most important thing is that you are warmed-up perfectly, and that's not the same as having put in the mechanics of a perfect warm up. It is rarely practical to adhere to a strict "400 warmup straight, 4x 50 on the minute build, and then some kick 25's, then dive starts". If you know it's going to be mayhem, if you know people will be swimming faster/slower than you typically go in warm up, then pay particular attention to this and prepare for it during the season. (For instance, I typically do the 400 warm up bit in broken 100's and 50's with a few seconds rest in between; and lots of bobs since I know i'll be in my corner doing bobs during warm up at a meet).

Other things to pay proper attention to are where the +s are on the wall, bottom line markers, any distinguishing features/markers, whether you might be in end lanes at night and have lights blaring, etc. I personally pay particular attention to the bottom of the + and the contrast of the bulkhead to water since I usually compete without goggles.

And while you are waiting in your spot on the wall, you can look up underneath the starting blocks, which I pay as much attention to as the top of the blocks. You make a mental note if there are any "catch areas" to watch out for, or cross bars that extend to the edge of the block. You don't want to be taking your mark, reach down, and then have a big lumpy rod where you intended to anchor your hand.

ColoJoel
December 24th, 2010, 12:15 PM
My lane does what Glenn describes (for the most part). I thought that was the 'standard' way to circle swim?

rtodd
December 24th, 2010, 01:11 PM
While we are on the subject, I rotate to my right on the pushoff. This just makes circle swimming a bit more difficult in my opinion. My son is learning turns so I am making sure he is rotating the other way.

ande
December 24th, 2010, 01:22 PM
it all depends on the situation the moment you're turning

it's best to veer towards the middle or further left

it's annoying when swimmers turn on the far right then attempt to angle to the other side (they usually don't & it can cause collisions)

geochuck
December 24th, 2010, 02:19 PM
When circle swimming you have to adjust how you turn each length so you do not collide with others. One pool I swim in they swim left to right in the lane on the left and in the lane next they swim right to left in the lane on the right. This means the swimmers close to each other are swimming in the same direction. NO arms hitting other swimmers.

orca1946
December 24th, 2010, 02:58 PM
I instruct our new swimmers to move to the left & flip. If you must hang do so to the right corner - away from where swimmers flip. I like Newcastle :applaud:

jaadams1
December 24th, 2010, 08:13 PM
I remember back in age group swimming when one team would "claim a lane", and then swim in reverse circle swim direction, down the left (opposite of everyone). Really sucks because half the time, their lane was the least occupied during warmup. I used to hop in this lane and swim fly right down the middle, just to tick 'em off. :afraid::argue:

geochuck
December 24th, 2010, 09:21 PM
Just wondering did you also leave your lane to swim Fly with noodlers and the exercise class?


I remember back in age group swimming when one team would "claim a lane", and then swim in reverse circle swim direction, down the left (opposite of everyone). Really sucks because half the time, their lane was the least occupied during warmup. I used to hop in this lane and swim fly right down the middle, just to tick 'em off. :afraid::argue:

Peter Cruise
December 25th, 2010, 11:23 AM
Of course, all of this goes out the window when at large meets after 5 or 10 minutes of warmup, large groups congregate at each end; apparently to discuss the meaning of 'Lost' or debate public health care. This solid wall of flesh becomes even more complex if there is a semi-shallow end where standing is possible: then the solid wall becomes three dimensional. In those cases Rich, the best footplanting spot for your turn is at your option; butts or tummies give the best 'springboard' option for a rapid getaway.

rtodd
December 25th, 2010, 01:23 PM
it's annoying when swimmers turn on the far right then attempt to angle to the other side (they usually don't & it can cause collisions)

This is true. You must know your gap(s). If you know someone is up on you, you can't do this.

orca1946
December 26th, 2010, 06:43 PM
Should the coach get involved or let the lane handle it ?

ElaineK
December 26th, 2010, 06:51 PM
Should the coach get involved or let the lane handle it ?

I would think the easiest way to handle the issue is for the coach to set the rules on circle swimming and make it consistent for everybody. This would save a lot of discussion and cut to the chase; the swim workout! If everybody is on the same page, it simplifies everything.

I haven't shared a lane for workouts since high school, so this is just my :2cents:...

philoswimmer
December 26th, 2010, 07:00 PM
I would think the easiest way to handle the issue is for the coach to set the rules on circle swimming and make it consistent for everybody. This would save a lot of discussion and cut to the chase; the swim workout! If everybody is on the same page, it simplifies everything.

I haven't shared a lane for workouts since high school, so this is just my :2cents:...

We have a team policy, which is pretty much what people have described here: flip to left, rest to the right. Now getting people to do it (or expect it) is another story...

geochuck
December 26th, 2010, 07:26 PM
I think you are all making a problem out of circle swimming. Very easily handled it is called cooperation. You seem to be making a mountain out of a mole hill.

The coach probably never has to interfere.

ganache
December 27th, 2010, 12:53 AM
If the lane is not too crowded and wide enough, someone can pass a slower swimmer on the wall without either swimmer stopping. Often in our distance sets (500's or 400's), the lead swimmer will catch the last swimmer. The faster swimmer would tap the slower swimmer's foot before they approach the wall. The slower swimmer slows down slightly and flips on the right side. The faster swimmer crosses over and flips on the left side and they push off together. The faster swimmer speeds up and the slower swimmer moves behind the faster swimmer. Of course the coach needs to teach the swimmers in the workout how to down this.

Guvnah
December 31st, 2010, 01:01 AM
I think this is the most problematic when it's not in an organized workout.

At least you (should) have swimmers of similar skills/speed in a given circle lane when it occurs in an organized workout. Coaches should make sure this happens.

But when you're at the YMCA open lap swim ... all bets are off. The manatees are simple unaware of the serious swimmers around them. I can be bearing down on them at the wall, and they'll still push off instead of waiting two seconds and letting me pass.

Fortunately for me, circle swimming at my pool is a rarity. Their schedules are well known, and very consistent. There is really only one circumstance that causes circle swimming: when the aerobics class gets 4 of the 6 lanes, and one lane is used for a swimming class. All lap swimmers of any capability are all collapsed into one remaining lane. I might find myself in that situation about 2 or 3 times a year. And when I am there, I make sure all participants know some basic rules: Swim to the right; turn on the left side of the T; stop on the right side of the T; keep aware of who is behind you and let them pass if they are catching up.

Redbird Alum
January 1st, 2011, 05:16 PM
.... The manatees are simple unaware of the serious swimmers around them. ...

Manatees! I love that... much better than "bobbers" or "noodlers".

orca1946
January 3rd, 2011, 12:00 AM
Manatees with milk bottles in the lanes next to us drive me crazy with no shower & way too much perfume !!

cjquill
January 3rd, 2011, 10:45 AM
Orca, you are misinformed - they're water buffalo. Yeah, I know, hard to tell them apart.

Dolphin 2
January 3rd, 2011, 12:34 PM
If you are going to swim in circles, be sure there aren’t any of these circling around you:

http://l.yimg.com/l/tv/us/img/site/15/95/0000041595_20070723175112.jpg

Happy New Year everybody!!! :bump:

D2